A Victorian Publisher

1 In their zeal to promote honest reviewing the opponents of Colburn and Bentley
seemed to take the line that a publisher should not promote his books in the least
: he should simply put them on sale . The crusaders against puffing failed to ...

A Victorian Publisher

Author: Royal A. Gettmann

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521153201

Page: 296

View: 193

This is a study of the rise and activity of the London publishing house which started in 1829 as Bentley and Colburn and was finally absorbed by Macmillan in 1898. Professor Gettmann has worked from the surviving papers of the firm and it is probable that he has here given more detail about the aims, methods and successes of an English publisher of the time than can be found anywhere else. Since there is constant reference from the activities of Bentley to that of his contemporaries, it is also a microcosm of English authorship and publishing from the time of Scott to that of Meredith: one of the great period of English publishing enterprise. It discusses movements of taste and cycles of popular reading and illustrates the relationship between publisher and author. It also deals with authors' contracts and rewards and in short, deals with every aspect of English publishing in an important period.

Kegan Paul a Victorian Imprint

Howsam combines biography and analytic bibliography in her study of the Kegan Paul imprint to reconstruct a biographical and business history of the firm.

Kegan Paul  a Victorian Imprint

Author: Leslie Howsam

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 9780802041265

Page: 218

View: 511

Howsam combines biography and analytic bibliography in her study of the Kegan Paul imprint to reconstruct a biographical and business history of the firm.

Victorian Publishing

Drawing on research into the book-production records of twelve publishers taken at ten-year intervals from 1836 to 1916, this book interprets broad trends in the growth and diversity of book publishing in Victorian Britain.

Victorian Publishing

Author: Alexis Weedon

Publisher: Gower Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN: 9780754635277

Page: 212

View: 460

Drawing on research into the book-production records of twelve publishers taken at ten-year intervals from 1836 to 1916, this book interprets broad trends in the growth and diversity of book publishing in Victorian Britain. Chapters explore the significance of the export trade to the colonies and the rising importance of towns outside London as centres of publishing; the influence of technological change in increasing the variety and quantity of books; and how the business practice of literary publishing developed to expand the market for British and American authors.The book takes examples from the purchase and sale of popular fiction as well as works by canonical authors such as George Eliot, Wilkie Collins, and Mark Twain. Consideration of the unique demands of the educational market complements the focus on fiction, as readers, arithmetic books, music, geography, science textbooks and Greek and Latin classics became more of a staple for publishing houses.

Kegan Paul A Victorian Imprint

INTRODUCTION his book, the history of a publisher's imprint, tells two connected
stories: one about the personalities of a group of London publishers and the
impression their characters made on the people who knew them: the other about
a ...

Kegan Paul  A Victorian Imprint

Author: Howsam,

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136174354

Page: 256

View: 309

The Kegan Paul imprint was created and its reputation for a distinguished list of titles established during a forty-year period from 1871 to 1911. Several publishers, and their firms, were involved in the development of the imprint during this period, beginning with Henry S. King and Company, and following in 1877 with Charles Kegan Paul and his partner Alfred Chenevix Trench. A financial crisis in 1889 forced an amalgamation with two other businesses and the new firm changed managers periodically until George Routledge and Son took over the business in 1911.Leslie Howsam combines biography and analytic bibliography in her study of the Kegan Paul imprint to demonstrate the value of publishing history as a contribution to the scholarly study of the book. Basing her research on intensive work in the company's surviving archives and supplemented by extensive library work with the actual books, Howsam looks at the wide range of significant titles published for the imprint. In addition, she reconstructs a biographical and business history of the firm based on published and unpublished accounts of the individuals involved, including the publishers and their families, and looks at the effects of changing business practices. The focus of Victorian Imprint Kegan Paul is the duality of imprint: the publisher's imprint upon a list of books, and publisher's personalities, the imprint of their taste and judgment on the culture in which they lived.

Victorian Fiction Writers Publishers Readers

Exact figures will never be known but we can estimate that around 50,000 works were produced by around 3,500 novelists during the Victorian era. But who wrote these novels and what inspired them to write?

Victorian Fiction  Writers  Publishers  Readers

Author: John Sutherland

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1349239372

Page: 191

View: 997

The proportion of Victorian novels in print today represents only a tiny fraction of what was published by this vast writing industry. Exact figures will never be known but we can estimate that around 50,000 works were produced by around 3,500 novelists during the Victorian era. But who wrote these novels and what inspired them to write? How were their novels published and how did they adapt their techniques to ensure the public's appetite for fiction was fed? Drawing on extensive research, John Sutherland builds up a fascinating picture of the cultural, social and commercial factors influencing the content and production of Victorian fiction. Collins, Dickens, Eliot, Thackeray and Trollope are discussed in tandem with writers also very popular with the reading public - Reade, Lytton and Mrs Humphry Ward - but whose fame has not endured. As John Sutherland demonstrates, author-publisher relations played a central role in determining the success of new novels, with some impressive achievements on both sides. Richly informative on the Victorian literary and cultural scene, this important study by one of our leading scholars is set to become essential reading for all those interested in the evolution of the Victorian novel.

The Art Journal and Fine Art Publishing in Victorian England 1850 880

In 1833, a magazine publisher, “Matthew Arnold” [not to be confused with the ...
between 1815 and 1839 averaged four per year.10 The Art-Journal may have
entered in media res the art-journal and fine art publishing in victorian england
68.

 The Art Journal and Fine Art Publishing in Victorian England  1850 880

Author: Katherine Haskins

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351546287

Page: 226

View: 572

Focusing on an era that both inherited and irretrievably altered the form and the content of earlier art production, The Art-Journal and Fine Art Publishing in Victorian England, 1850-1880 argues that fine art practices and the audiences and markets for them were influenced by the media culture of art publishing and journalism in substantial and formative ways, perhaps more than at any other time in the history of English art. The study centers on forms of Victorian picture-making and the art knowledge systems defining them, and draws on the histories of art, literature, journalism, and publishing. The historical example employed in the book is that of the more than 800 steel-plate prints after paintings published in the London-based Art-Journal between 1850 and 1880. The cultural phenomenon of the Art Journal print is shown to be a key connector in mid-Victorian art appreciation by drawing out specific tropes of likeness. This study also examines the important links between paint and print; the aesthetic values and domestic aspirations of the Victorian middle class; and the inextricable intertwining of fine art and 'trade' publishing.

Literature in the Marketplace

This collection of essays examines cultural and literary issues in nineteenth-century book production and circulation.

Literature in the Marketplace

Author: John O. Jordan

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521893930

Page: 356

View: 756

This collection of essays examines cultural and literary issues in nineteenth-century book production and circulation.

The Rise and Fall of the Victorian Three Volume Novel

Utilizing publishers' archives when existing, scholars have furthered our
understanding of the Victorian publishing business, especially as it relates to the
fiction marketplace. Several recent studies have focused on Victorian publishers.

The Rise and Fall of the Victorian Three Volume Novel

Author: Troy J. Bassett

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN: 3030319261

Page: 256

View: 935

Utilizing recent developments in book history and digital humanities, this book offers a cultural, economic, and literary history of the Victorian three-volume novel, the prestige format for the British novel during much of the nineteenth century. With the publication of Walter Scott’s popular novels in the 1820s, the three-volume novel became the standard format for new fiction aimed at middle-class audiences through the support of circulating libraries. Following a quantitative analysis examining who wrote and published these novels, the book investigates the success of publisher Richard Bentley in producing three-volume novels, the experiences of the W. H. Smith circulating library in distributing them, the difficulties of authors such as Robert Louis Stevenson and George Moore in writing them, and the resistance of new publishers such as Arrowsmith and Unwin to publishing them. Rather than faltering, the three-volume novel stubbornly endured until its abandonment in the 1890s.

Poetry Pictures and Popular Publishing

The Illustrated Gift Book and Victorian Visual Culture, 1855-1875 Lorraine
Janzen Kooistra. 281 ———. Christmas Books, No. II. December 12, 1863, 766–
67. ———. Christmas Books and Gift Books, No. 1. December 2, 1865, 711–12.
———.

Poetry  Pictures  and Popular Publishing

Author: Lorraine Janzen Kooistra

Publisher: Ohio University Press

ISBN: 0821443801

Page: 312

View: 348

In Poetry, Pictures, and Popular Publishing eminent Rossetti scholar LorraineJanzen Kooistra demonstrates the cultural centrality of a neglected artifact:the Victorian illustrated gift book. Turning a critical lens on “drawing-room books” as both material objects and historical events, Kooistra reveals how the gift book’s visual/verbal form mediated “high” and popular art as well as book and periodical publication. A composite text produced by many makers, the poetic gift book was designed for domestic space and a female audience; its mode of publication marks a significant momentin the history of authorship, reading, and publishing. With rigorous attention to the gift book’s aesthetic and ideological features, Kooistra analyzes the contributions of poets, artists, engravers, publishers, and readers and shows how its material form moved poetry into popular culture. Drawing on archival and periodical research, she offers new readings of Eliza Cook, Adelaide Procter, and Jean Ingelow and shows the transatlantic reach of their verses. Boldly re-situating Tennyson’s works within the gift-book economy he dominated, Kooistra demonstrates how the conditions of corporate authorship shaped the production and receptionof the laureate’s verses at the peak of his popularity. Poetry, Pictures, and Popular Publishing changes the map of poetry’s place—in all its senses—in Victorian everydaylife and consumer culture.

The Journals of a Victorian Traveller

The book is first-hand history; Julia records in her journals her day-to-day life from 140 years ago, some of the events that she witnessed would hardly seem possible, or even acceptable in today’s world.

The Journals of a Victorian Traveller

Author: Martin Laurie

Publisher: Book Guild Publishing

ISBN: 1913551555

Page:

View: 777

The Journals of a Victorian Traveller contains the transcribed and edited journals of Julia Biddulph who travelled the world with her husband during the last two decades of the 19th Century. The journals had remained unread since being rescued from the ruins of a bombed house in Canterbury during the Second World War. Julia Biddulph was a daughter of the Empire; her husband was a soldier and Political Agent in India. Julia’s first journey to India in the 1860s had taken seven weeks. Within thirty years she records her record voyage from Charing Cross, London to Bombay in thirteen days and six hours. She had a great enthusiasm for life and preferred to take part, rather than watch from the side-lines, which would have been the easy option for ladies in similar circumstances to her own. The book is first-hand history; Julia records in her journals her day-to-day life from 140 years ago, some of the events that she witnessed would hardly seem possible, or even acceptable in today’s world. Martin Laurie was born and raised in Essex where he worked for over thirty years as a farmer in a family partnership. He is now an ex-farmer with a life-long interest in the countryside and its traditions. Martin says, “I have always had a fascination with history and after reading the journals, I realised that they might be of interest to a wider audience. When reading the journals or diaries of an individual from many years ago, you are transported into their life; what they saw, touched and even smelt; it is first-hand. You can agree or disagree, approve or disapprove of what they wrote, but you cannot alter the fact that it is history. These diaries were written by my ancestor, Julia Biddulph (1844–1933).”

Victorian Publishing and Mrs Gaskell s Work

Other authors would have exerted less agency in the publishing process, as we
will show in chapter 4 regarding Gaskell and her frequent editor, Charles Dickens
. "Standing," then, as we are using it, at once implies narrative stance, location ...

Victorian Publishing and Mrs  Gaskell s Work

Author: Linda K. Hughes

Publisher: University of Virginia Press

ISBN: 9780813918754

Page: 201

View: 761

For much of her own century, Elizabeth Gaskell was recognized as a voice of Victorian convention—-the loyal wife, good mother, and respected writer—-a reputation that led to her steady decline in the view of twentieth-century literary critics. Recent scholars, however, have begun to recognize that Mrs. Gaskell's high standing in Victorian society allowed her to effect change in conventional ideology. Linda K. Hughes and Michael Lund focus this reevaluation on issues pertaining to the Victorian literary marketplace. Victorian Publishing and Mrs. Gaskell's Work portrays an elusive and self-aware writer whose refusal to grant authority to a single perspective even while she recirculated the fundamental assumptions and debates of her era enabled her simultaneously to fulfill and deflect the expectations of the literary marketplace. While she wrote for money, producing periodical fiction, major novels, and nonfiction, Mrs. Gaskell was able to maintain a tone of warmth and empathy that allowed her to imagine multiple social and epistemological alternatives. Writing from within the established rubrics of gender, narrative, and publication format, she nevertheless performed important cultural work.

Victorian Novelists and Publishers

For most modern critics nineteenth-century fiction has thus come to mean the
great Victorian novelists and their rather shadowy accomplices, the Victorian
reading public. Comparatively scant attention is paid to the figures whom the
publishing ...

Victorian Novelists and Publishers

Author: J. A. Sutherland

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 1472508955

Page: 260

View: 775

Introduction Part One: The Novel Publishing World, 1830-1870 1. Novel Publishing 1830-1870 2. Mass Market and Big Business: Novel Publishing at Midcentury 3. Craft versus Trade: Novelists and Publishers Part Two: Novelists, Novels and their Publishers, 1830-1870 4. Henry Esmond: The Shaping Power of Contract 5. Westward Ho!: 'A Popularly Successful Book' 6. Trollope: Making the First Rank 7. Lever and Ainsworth: Missing the First Rank 8. Dickens as Publisher 9. Marketing Middlemarch 10. Hardy: Breaking into Fiction Notes Index

Alexander Strahan Victorian Publisher

For My Grandson : Remembrances of an Ancient Victorian . London : John
Murray , 1933 . Porritt , Arthur . The Best I Remember . London : Cassell , 1922 .
The Prayer - Gauge Debate . Boston : Congregational Publishing Society , 1876 .

Alexander Strahan  Victorian Publisher

Author: Patricia Thomas Srebrnik

Publisher: Ann Arbor : University of Michigan Press

ISBN:

Page: 269

View: 448

Victorian Publishers Bindings

Jervis Jervis , S High Victorian design . Ottawa : National ... Kelly Kelly ' s
directory of stationers , printers , booksellers , publishers and paper makers .
Kelly & Co 1st ... McLean : JC McLean , R Joseph Cundall , a Victorian publisher .
Pinner ...

Victorian Publishers  Bindings

Author: Douglas Ball

Publisher: Library Association Publishing (UK)

ISBN:

Page: 214

View: 888

House of Blackwood

House of Blackwood

Author: David Finkelstein

Publisher: Penn State Press

ISBN: 9780271048222

Page:

View: 802

The Scottish publishing firm of William Blackwood & Sons, founded in 1804, was a major force in nineteenth- and early twentieth-century British literary history, publishing a diverse group of important authors—including George Eliot, John Galt, Thomas de Quincey, Margaret Oliphant, Anthony Trollope, Joseph Conrad, and John Buchan, among many others—in book form and in its monthlyBlackwood's Magazine. In The House of Blackwood, David Finkelstein exposes for the first time the successes and failures of this onetime publishing powerhouse. Finkelstein begins with a general history of the Blackwood firm from 1804 to 1920, attending to family dynamics over several generations, to their molding of a particular political and national culture, to the shaping of a Blackwood's audience, and to the multiple causes for the firm's decline in the decades before World War I. He then uses six case studies of authors—Conrad, Oliphant, John Hanning Speke, George Tompkyns Chesney, Charles Reade, and E. M. Forster—and their relationships with the publishing house. He mines the voluminous correspondence of the firm with its authors and, eventually, with the authors' agents. The value of the archive Finkelstein studies is its completeness, the depth of the ledger material (particularly interesting given that the Blackwoods did much of their own printing), and the extraordinary longevity of the firm. A key value of Finkelstein's account is his attention to the author/publisher/reader circuit that Robert Darnton emphasizes as the central focus of book history.

A Victorian Authority

Leader ( -1878 ) James Beaty ( publisher ) . Conservative until 1872 ( a party
organ ) , thereafter increasingly eccentric . 9,710 ( 1872 ) . Mail / Mail and Empire
( 1872- ) T.C. Patteson 1872-77 ( manager ) , C.W. Bunting 1877-96 ( manager )
 ...

A Victorian Authority

Author: Paul Rutherford

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page: 292

View: 675

During the last third of the nineteenth century a fierce rivalry among party 'organs, ' sectarian dailies, upstart 'people's journals, ' and revamped 'quality' papers fashioned a popular journalism for a large, chiefly urban audience in Canada. By the end of the 1890s, the number of daily and weekly editions of these newspapers exceeded the count of Canadian families. The country's first mass medium has arrived. Professor Rutherford charts the growth of the daily press, describing personalities and events. He surveys the cultural prerequisites for mass communication -- the growth of the city, of urban publics, and of mass literacy -- and looks at the personnel, business routines, and worries of the new industry, showing how the news and views, ads and entertainment of the press changed as publishers competed for increased circulation. He also analyses the mythologies purveyed by the popular press across Canada, defines the press's connection with the 'establishment, ' and shows how daily papers suited the libertarian model of a 'free press.' This volume is a novel addition to our literature on nation building, revealing the significant role played by the popular press in the making of Victorian society and the shaping of the twentieth century.