Achilles in Greek Tragedy

Examines how the tragic dramatists persistently appropriated Achilles to address the concerns of their time.

Achilles in Greek Tragedy

Author: Pantelis Michelakis

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521038928

Page: 236

View: 161

Examines how the tragic dramatists persistently appropriated Achilles to address the concerns of their time.

Harmful Interaction Between the Living and the Dead in Greek Tragedy

multiple characters in the tragedy). Achilles initially seems a likely candidate for
an agentive relationship as he is himself connected with the halting of the fleet:
Polydorus and the Chorus both claim that Achilles held back the fleet when he ...

Harmful Interaction Between the Living and the Dead in Greek Tragedy

Author: Bridget Martin

Publisher:

ISBN: 178962150X

Page: 208

View: 339

Examiningthe manifest and invisible dead, this book considers the nature, extent andlimitations of harmful interaction between the living and the dead in Greektragedy, concentrating on the abilities of the dead, the consequences of corpse exposure andmutilation, and the use of avenging agents by the dead.

The Anger of Achilles

Leonard Muellner's goal is to restore the Greek word for the anger of Achilles, menis, to its social, mythical, and poetic contexts. His point of departure is the anthropology of emotions.

The Anger of Achilles

Author: Leonard Charles Muellner

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 9780801432309

Page: 219

View: 792

Leonard Muellner's goal is to restore the Greek word for the anger of Achilles, menis, to its social, mythical, and poetic contexts. His point of departure is the anthropology of emotions. He believes that notions of anger vary between cultures and that the particular meaning of a word such as menis needs to emerge from a close study of Greek epic. Menis means more than an individual's emotional response. On the basis of the epic exemplifications of the word, Muellner defines the term as a cosmic sanction against behavior that violates the most basic rules of human society. Virtually absent from the Odyssey, the term menis appears in the Iliad in conjunction with the enforcement of social rules, especially the rules of reciprocal exchange. To understand the way menis functions, Muellner invokes the concept of tabu developed by Mary Douglas, stressing both the power and the danger that accrue to a person who violates such rules. Transgressive behavior has both a creative and a destructive aspect. Muellner draws on the method of mythical analysis developed by Pierre-Yves Jacopin. He applies the restructured definition of menis to the anger of Achilles in the narrative of the Iliad, tracing the moral issues that motivate cosmic anger and, finally, exploring the transformation of menis into the social term that is explicitly named as its opposite: philotes, or friendship.

Scenes from Greek Drama

central figure of only one ancient tragedy, it would seem, the Achilles trilogy of
Aeschylus. We cannot prove—indeed, as we shall see, it is not even probable—
that Aeschylus expressly mentioned Achilles' decision, but in the trilogy the figure
of ...

Scenes from Greek Drama

Author: Bruno Snell

Publisher:

ISBN: 0520319079

Page: 160

View: 894

This title is part of UC Press's Voices Revived program, which commemorates University of California Press's mission to seek out and cultivate the brightest minds and give them voice, reach, and impact. Drawing on a backlist dating to 1893, Voices Revived makes high-quality, peer-reviewed scholarship accessible once again using print-on-demand technology. This title was originally published in 1964.

Greek Tragedy on Screen

This volume situates these films within the context of on-going debates in film criticism and reception theory in relation to theoretical or critical readings of tragedy in contemporary culture.

Greek Tragedy on Screen

Author: Pantelis Michelakis

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 019923907X

Page: 267

View: 329

Greek Tragedy on Screen considers a wide range of films which engage openly with narrative and performative aspects of Greek tragedy. This volume situates these films within the context of on-going debates in film criticism and reception theory in relation to theoretical or critical readings of tragedy in contemporary culture. Michelakis argues that film adaptations of Greek tragedy need to be placed between the promises of cinema for a radical popular culture, and the divergent cultural practices and realities of commercial films, art-house films, silent cinema, and films for television, home video, and DVD. In an age where the boundaries between art and other forms of cultural production are constantly intersected and reconfigured, the appeal of Greek tragedy for the screen needs to be related to the longing it triggers for origins and authenticity, as well as to the many uncertainties, such as homelessness, violence, and loss of identity, with which it engages. The films discussed include not only critically recognized films by directors such Michael Cacoyannis, Jules Dassin, and Pier Paolo Pasolini, but also more recent films by Woody Allen, Tony Harrison, Werner Herzog, and Lars von Trier. Moreover, it also considers earlier and largely neglected films of cinematic traditions which lie outside Hollywood.

The Greek Tragic Theatre

Wodhull, Esq. with a Dissertation on Ancient Tragedy by Thomas Franklin, ... in
Seven Volumes. ... with dry feet , behold our Son Achilles , to his parents juftly
dear , Inhabiting that [ 23 ] ifle whose chalky coasts Are ( 23 ) The island here
ipoken ...

The Greek Tragic Theatre

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page:

View: 957

Euripides Iphigenia at Aulis

Pantelis Michelakis examines the mythological, socio-political and institutional background, as well as the cultural, political, institutional, and theatrical contexts within which it was originally composed and performed.He highlights the ...

Euripides  Iphigenia at Aulis

Author: Pantelis Michelakis

Publisher: Bristol Classical Press

ISBN:

Page: 176

View: 441

"Iphigenia at Aulis dramatizes the myth of Iphigenia, the young virgin sacrificed by her Father Agamemnon at the start of the expedition against Troy. The ongoing debates around Iphigenia's voluntary sacrifice, the corruption of the play's moral universe, and the corruption of its text make Iphigenia at Aulis one of Euripides' most intriguing and challenging plays." "This Companion provides a summary of the plot, discusses the characters and main themes of the play, examines its mythological background, and explores the cultural, political, institutional, and theatrical contexts within which it was originally composed and performed. It also maps the changing fortunes and meanings of the play and outlines the history of its interpretations on page, stage, and screen."--BOOK JACKET.

Aias Ajax

Most previous versions and interpretations have equivocated over Sophocles' bold vision. This edition of Aias translates precisely that transformation of the hero from the bygone figure to the man who transcends time.

Aias  Ajax

Author: Sophocles

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 0195128192

Page: 100

View: 551

Based on the conviction that only translators who write poetry themselves can properly recreate the celebrated Greek tragedies, the Greek Tragedy in New Translation series offers new translations that go beyond the literal meaning of the Greek in order to evoke the poetry of the originals. Under the general editorship of Peter Burian and Alan Shapiro, each volume includes a critical introduction, commentary on the text, full stage directions, and a glossary of the mythical and geographical references in the plays. Brought boldly to life by Herbert Golder and Richard Pevear's translation and contextualized by Herbert Golder's eloquent introduction, this early Sophoclean tragedy tells the story of the Homeric hero better known as Ajax, who was second only to Achilles among the Greek warriors. In Greek tradition, Aias figures as the archaic warrior who dies in shame after his betrayal by the Greeks. Sophocles turns tradition inside out, portraying Aias' suicide not as a disgrace but as heroism. He endows Aias suicide with a meaning radically different from previous versions of the Aias myth--Aias is not the hero whom time has passed by, but rather the man who steps beyond time. Most previous versions and interpretations have equivocated over Sophocles' bold vision. This edition of Aias translates precisely that transformation of the hero from the bygone figure to the man who transcends time.

The Greek Theatre of Father Brumoy

Her devoting herself is more a voluntary act ; for the least of those sighs which
she gives her lover in the French play , or the flightest hint that she wilhed to live ,
would in the Greek tragedy have authorised Achilles to save her . But she rejects
 ...

The Greek Theatre of Father Brumoy

Author: Pierre Brumoy

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page: 478

View: 144

Translations of plays by Aeschylus, Aristophanes, Euripides, Seneca, and Sophocles, analyzed and compared with plays by Racine, Corneille, and Rotrou on similar subjects.

Greek Tragedy

Neoptolemus ' presence at Troy , like that of his father before him , is essential for
a Greek victory , and the fictitious tale of his quarrel with Odysseus and the
Atreidae closely resembles Achilles ' quarrel with Agamemnon . 20 This pattern is
 ...

Greek Tragedy

Author: Ian McAuslan

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN:

Page: 225

View: 403

This volume, the second in the series Greece & Rome Studies, collects together 17 articles on Greek Tragedy published between 1972 and 1989 in the journal Greece & Rome (published by Oxford University Press for the Classical Association). Greek Tragedy remains a subject of central concern, not only in Classics, English, and World Literature courses at school and university, but also in the live theatre, where new translations of the plays of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides continue to play to capacity audiences. The articles in this volume, by leading authorities in the field, include treatments of individual plays by all three playwrights, studies of character and imagery, and, to begin with, an examination of recent critical assumptions. Those studying Greek Tragedy either in Greek or in translation will find their interests well represented.

Greek drama

11 THE ATTIC STAGE OF THE FIFTH CENTURI Achilles Character of these
songs $ 2 SINGING BY INDIVIDUALS IN HOMER In the Odyssey , when Hermes
arrives at the island of Calypso , on the mission of liberating Ulysses , he The
Song ...

Greek drama

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page:

View: 564

Cheiron s Way

This book studies the social and ethical formation of youthful figures in Homer, Sophocles, and Euripides.

Cheiron s Way

Author: Justina Gregory

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 0190857889

Page: 344

View: 432

This book studies the social and ethical formation of youthful figures in Homer, Sophocles, and Euripides. Every fictional character comes with a past attached, a presumed personal history that is both implicit and explicit; for the youthful heroes and heroines of epic and tragedy, early education figures significantly in that past. Cheiron's Way takes as its point of departure the words of Homer's Phoenix to Achilles, who claims, "I made you the man you are" as he pleads with his former pupil to let go of his anger. The book begins by exploring topics relevant to heroic and tragic education: age classes, rites of passage, verbal modes of instruction, social conditioning, mentoring, peer role models, and the controversial balance between nature and nurture. It introduces the first teacher in the Greek tradition, Cheiron the centaur, who founded a school for young heroes in his Thessalian cave and instructed Achilles, Jason, and others with mixed success. Next it turns to the Iliadic Achilles, who achieves maturity by way of successive crises-a crisis of disillusionment with the assumptions that shaped his heroic education, followed by a crisis of empathy for his adversary-and who becomes an influential prototype for tragedy. Examination of the Odyssey suggests that while Odysseus received a normative heroic upbringing and Nausicaa internalizes social expectations for young women, Telemachus is more of an outlier. In tragic representations of education Sophocles' Ajax and Neoptolemus replicate the Achillean pattern only partially and unsuccessfully, as does Euripides' Hippolytus; only Achilles and Iphigenia in Euripides' Iphigenia in Aulis achieve an emotional maturity commensurate with the Iliadic Achilles'. Yet all these texts confirm, as elegantly argued in this book, the perennial lure, despite uncertain results, of the educational enterprise for communities, students, and teachers.

Studies of the Greek Poets

The situation was a grand one for working out that purification of the passions
which Greek tragedy required . The sullen and selfish wrath of Achilles had
brought its bitter consequence of suffering and sorrow for the hero , as well as of
disaster ...

Studies of the Greek Poets

Author: John Addington Symonds

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page: 399

View: 701

The Foreign Quarterly Review

Æschylus wrote a tragedy , entitled Myrmidones , in commemoration of the love
of Achilles ; and perhaps few things among the lost treasures of Greek literature
are so much to be regretted as this play , which would have cast clear light upon
 ...

The Foreign Quarterly Review

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page:

View: 858

The Captive Woman s Lament in Greek Tragedy

The Captive Woman's Lament in Greek Tragedy addresses the possible meanings ancient audiences might have attached to these songs.

The Captive Woman s Lament in Greek Tragedy

Author: Casey Dué

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 0292709463

Page: 189

View: 351

The laments of captive women found in extant Athenian tragedy constitute a fundamentally subversive aspect of Greek drama. In performances supported by and intended for the male citizens of Athens, the songs of the captive women at the Dionysia gave a voice to classes who otherwise would have been marginalized and silenced in Athenian society: women, foreigners, and the enslaved. The Captive Woman's Lament in Greek Tragedy addresses the possible meanings ancient audiences might have attached to these songs. Casey Dué challenges long-held assumptions about the opposition between Greeks and barbarians in Greek thought by suggesting that, in viewing the plight of the captive women, Athenian audiences extended pity to those least like themselves. Dué asserts that tragic playwrights often used the lament to create an empathetic link that blurred the line between Greek and barbarian. After a brief overview of the role of lamentation in both modern and classical traditions, Dué focuses on the dramatic portrayal of women captured in the Trojan War, tracing their portrayal through time from the Homeric epics to Euripides' Athenian stage. The author shows how these laments evolved in their significance with the growth of the Athenian Empire. She concludes that while the Athenian polis may have created a merciless empire outside the theater, inside the theater they found themselves confronted by the essential similarities between themselves and those they sought to conquer.

An Anthology of Greek Tragedy

I looked upon my husband dead at Achilles ' hands And saw the child I bore him ,
Astyanax , Hurled down from the steep towers of the city , When the Greeks
captured the land of Troy . From what was once the freest home of all I now have
 ...

An Anthology of Greek Tragedy

Author: Albert Cook

Publisher: Spring Publications

ISBN:

Page: 400

View: 261

The Journal of Hellenic Studies

It offers stimulating discussions of individual plays and serves as a
comprehensive guide and standard work of reference . Thalia PAPADOPOULOU
University of loannina MICHELAKIS ( P . ) Achilles in Greek Tragedy . Cambridge
UP , 2002 .

The Journal of Hellenic Studies

Author: Percy Gardner

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page:

View: 810

Vols. 1-8, 1880-87, plates published separately and numbered I-LXXXIII.