Chaldean Grammar

This is a comprehensive Grammar of the Chaldean "Neo-Aramaic" Language.

Chaldean Grammar

Author: Mar Sarhad Y. Jammo

Publisher: CreateSpace

ISBN: 9781496194923

Page: 272

View: 206

This is a comprehensive Grammar of the Chaldean "Neo-Aramaic" Language. The rationale of this book is a combination of a “pure grammar” and a “pedagogical” one, where as much as possible grammatical forms are presented completely (for example, that of the Adjective or the Present Tense Verb), but with the progressive learning of a student in mind, especially in the selection of Vocabulary and Exercises. The 2000-Word Dictionaries at the end of the book, as well as the selections of Literature in the Chaldean language, are intended to be useful for one learning, though not in any sense comprehensive.

Magister Amoris The Roman de la Rose and Vernacular Hermeneutics

... that the art of grammar may be regarded as divided into species in accordance
with the various languages in which it is displayed.5 Hence one may speak of
Latin grammar, Greek grammar, Hebrew grammar, and Chaldean grammar
and ...

Magister Amoris  The Roman de la Rose and Vernacular Hermeneutics

Author: Alastair J. Minnis

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191580627

Page: 368

View: 662

The Roman de la Rose was a major bestseller - largely due to its robust treatment of 'natural' sexuality. This study concentrates on the ways in which Jean de Meun, in imitation of Ovid, assumed the mock-magisterium (or mastership) of love. From Latin texts and literary theory Jean derived many hermeneutic rationales and generic categorizations, without allowing any one to dominate. Alastair J. Minnis considers allegorical versus literalistic expression in the poem, its competing discourses of allegorical covering and satiric stripping, Jean's provocative use of plain and sometimes obscene language in a widely accessible French work, the challenge of its homosocial and perhaps even homoerotic constructions, the subversive effects of coital comedy within a text characterized by intermittent aspirations to moral and scientific truth, and - placing the Rose's reception within the European history of vernacular hermeneutics - the problematic translation of literary authority from Latin into the vulgar tongue.

A comprehensive grammar of the English language

The books which teach the particular rules for writing a language are called
Grammars; and those that explain words and ... The chief of the ancient
languages are, the Hebrew, Chaldean, Syriac, Arabic, and Coptic; to which may
be added, the ...

A comprehensive grammar of the English language

Author: William Pinnock

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page:

View: 705

A Manual of the Chaldee Language containing a Chaldee Grammar chiefly from the German of G B Winer a chrestomathy and a vocabulary With an appendix on the Rabbinical character and style With a preface by M Stuart

In the first two passages the name 0.97 is applied to the dialect through which the
Assyrian and Chaldean officers made themselves understood in conversation
with Hebrews ( Jews ] ; i . e . the universal language of the inhabitants of the ...

A Manual of the Chaldee Language  containing a Chaldee Grammar  chiefly from the German of     G  B  Winer  a chrestomathy     and a vocabulary     With an appendix on the Rabbinical character and style   With a preface by M  Stuart

Author: Elias RIGGS

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page:

View: 945

The Spanish Disquiet

Mariana found the Chaldean paraphrase a useful addition but reprimanded Arias
Montano for not being as careful as he ... he found particularly offensive the
Chaldean grammar by Andreas Masius and the dictionary by Lefèvre dela
Boderie, ...

The Spanish Disquiet

Author: María M. Portuondo

Publisher:

ISBN: 022659226X

Page: 448

View: 888

In this book, historian María M. Portuondo takes us to sixteenth-century Spain, where she identifies a community of natural philosophers and biblical scholars. They shared what she calls the "Spanish Disquiet"--a preoccupation with the perceived shortcomings of prevailing natural philosophies and empirical approaches when it came to explaining the natural world. Foremost among them was Benito Arias Montano--Spain's most prominent biblical scholar and exegete of the sixteenth century. He was also a widely read member of the European intellectual community, and his motivation to reform natural philosophy shows that the Spanish Disquiet was a local manifestation of greater concerns about Aristotelian natural philosophy that were overtaking Europe on the eve of the Scientific Revolution. His approach to the study of nature framed the natural world as unfolding from a series of events described in the Book of Genesis, ultimately resulting in a new metaphysics, cosmology, physics, and even a natural history of the world. By bringing Arias Montano's intellectual and personal biography into conversation with broader themes that inform histories of science of the era, The Spanish Disquiet ensures an appreciation of the variety and richness of Arias Montano's thought and his influence on early modern science.

A compendious grammar of the Egyptian language With an appendix consisting of the Rudiments of a dictionary of the ancient Egyptian language in the enchorial character 3 by T Young

171 , H . ) In the 67th year according to the Chaldeans , on the 5th of Apellaeus ,
Mercury was in m 2° 20 ' : this was the 27 - 8th of Thoth , 504 N . towards the
morning . 0 - 2434 — 125 . 550 . Hence the first Chaldean year must have been
the ...

A compendious grammar of the Egyptian language  With an appendix consisting of the Rudiments of a dictionary of the ancient Egyptian language in the enchorial character  3 by T  Young

Author: Henry Tattam

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page:

View: 891

Maiden Tribute

In the merchant's office were a Chaldean grammar and a Russian, but he had
never heard ofa Printer's Grammar (FW 1: 27). The first assessment ofpestiferous
“Indiscriminate Charity” on 7 February 1870 appeared as a leader and was ...

Maiden Tribute

Author: Grace Eckley

Publisher: Xlibris Corporation

ISBN: 1462838111

Page: 464

View: 215

Maiden Tribute: A Life of W. T. Stead This journalist who communicated with his Senior Partner instantaneously, whose ecumenical advance beyond his epoch still startles his readers, throughout his life retained his Whitmanesque individualism and rugged speech. W. T. Stead frequently scoffed at the Anglican Sunday prayers that instructed God how to direct the affairs of the world. If God did not comply, it was not for want of pious instruction. Anglicans were wanting, and most of his late Victorian-Edwardian world was Anglican. W. T. Stead (1849-1912) was a Nonconforrmist with and without the capital n. Had he been born with a wooden spoon in his mouth, it meant only that God needed his help to make the world silver. He never ceased to believe the world could be made silver, for mankind in general was anonymously, even though sluggishly, contributing to the infinite ascending spiral traced by the finger of God between the universe and the ideal. Clearly, the position of women in the 1870s was far from the ideal, remote from the privileges selfishly guarded by men. Taking a cue from his mother who campaigned against the Contagious Diseases Actswhich punished women but not men for transmitting syphilishe determined to bring women nearer the honors of Mary the Mother and Mary the Magdalen, for these two women stand out against the gloom of the past radiant as the angels of God, and yet the true ideals of the womanhood of the world. Such appeared implausible. Everywhere he saw in the streets wretched ruins of humanity, women stamped and crushed into devils by society . . . . And the children nursed in debauchery, suckled in crime, predestined to a life of misery and shame! Mrs. Josephine Butler already knew that Britains leadership would not assist: in the grandest house of the kind in Paris, are to be seen portraits of all the great men who had frequented themdiplomatists, generals, and English Lords . . . . The brothel-keeper put a cross underneath the portrait at each visit, to mark the number of visits made to the house by these great men! Before he visited London, the export of English girls for State-regulated prostitution in Brussels imposed upon Stead a sense that he was destined to write an Uncle Toms Cabin on The Slavery of Europe. The burden is greater than I can bear. But if it is ultimately to be laid on my back, God will strengthen me for it. If I have to write it I shall have to plunge into the depths of the social hell, and that is impossible outside a great city. Even high-minded seekers of justice found the social hell a place they could not venture into. Initiating research for The Maiden Tribute of Modern Babylon, Stead took counsel with civic powers Lord Carnarvon, John Morley, Arthur Balfour, Henry Labouchere among others, and Sir Charles Russell, who declined an invitation to see for himself because as leader of the English Bar he could not play the rle of a detective in a house of ill-fame. As the shocking series of four daily exposes neared its close, why others had not done Steads work was explained by Benjamin Scott, the City Chamberlain who had prompted Stead to take up the cause: We had not the ability or the opportunity that Stead possessed, and lacked the courage. Stead had begun the Maiden Tribute with a complaint against British society, that chivalry was dead and Christianity effete. Benjamin Waugh praised him after the fact: The spirit of both survives in you to-day. Stead accomplished his goal: passage of the Criminal Law Amendment Act, still in force today. Why the British sent him to jail for passing the first child protection law is graced with the word technicality. Branded both a saint and a filthy ex-convict, Stead continued to use his journalistic strength to achieve justice for citizens; in the 1890s he turned to internationalism. Lobbying for arbitration for settling international disputes, he crafted a memorial calling for li

Shakespeare s Tremor and Orwell s Cough

... melted wax. Betty scowled at the bare shoulders and low necklines of the girls.
“You look like a bunch of bloody doxies.” Saucy Mary laughed and stuck out her
tongue. “How many shillings do you think we can get for a Chaldean grammar at
 ...

Shakespeare s Tremor and Orwell s Cough

Author: John J. Ross, MD

Publisher: St. Martin's Press

ISBN: 1250012074

Page: 304

View: 191

The doctor suddenly appeared beside Will, startling him. He was sleek and prosperous, with a dainty goatee. Though he smiled reassuringly, the poet noticed that he kept a safe distance. In a soothing, urbane voice, the physician explained the treatment: stewed prunes to evacuate the bowels; succulent meats to ease digestion; cinnabar and the sweating tub to cleanse the disease from the skin. The doctor warned of minor side effects: uncontrolled drooling, fetid breath, bloody gums, shakes and palsies. Yet desperate diseases called for desperate remedies, of course. Were Shakespeare's shaky handwriting, his obsession with venereal disease, and his premature retirement connected? Did John Milton go blind from his propaganda work for the Puritan dictator Oliver Cromwell, as he believed, or did he have a rare and devastating complication of a very common eye problem? Did Jonathan Swift's preoccupation with sex and filth result from a neurological condition that might also explain his late-life surge in creativity? What Victorian plague wiped out the entire Brontë family? What was the cause of Nathaniel Hawthorne's sudden demise? Were Herman Melville's disabling attacks of eye and back pain the product of "nervous affections," as his family and physicians believed, or did he actually have a malady that was unknown to medical science until well after his death? Was Jack London a suicide, or was his death the product of a series of self-induced medical misadventures? Why did W. B. Yeats's doctors dose him with toxic amounts of arsenic? Did James Joyce need several horrific eye operations because of a strange autoimmune disease acquired from a Dublin streetwalker? Did writing Nineteen Eighty-Four actually kill George Orwell? The Bard meets House, M.D. in this fascinating untold story of the impact of disease on the lives and works of some the finest writers in the English language. In Shakespeare's Tremor and Orwell's Cough, John Ross cheerfully debunks old biographical myths and suggests fresh diagnoses for these writers' real-life medical mysteries. The author takes us way back, when leeches were used for bleeding and cupping was a common method of cure, to a time before vaccinations, sterilized scalpels, or real drug regimens. With a healthy dose of gross descriptions and a deep love for the literary output of these ten greats, Ross is the doctor these writers should have had in their time of need.

Lexicographica

MUENSTER published roughly at the same time ( 1527 ) both a Chaldean
grammar and a lexicon , and about the same time scholars such as SANTES
PAGNINUS , PAULUS FAGius as well as WOLFGANG CAPITO published their
own ...

Lexicographica

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

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Classified List

( Strassb . 1916 ? ) ..... ..BrT2227.681 Nöldeke , T. Mandäisches . ( Strassb . 1916
) ..... .BYT2227.681.2 2228 Languages , Semitic , Aramaic , Chaldean , Grammar
Dalman , G. H. Grammatik des jüdisch - palästinischen Aramäisch . Lpz . 1894 .

Classified List

Author: Princeton University. Library

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page:

View: 893

Grammar of the Dialects of the Vernacular Syriac

THE object of the present grammar is to make known the various dialects of the
Eastern Syrians (Nestorians or Chaldeans) who inhabit the mountains of
Kurdistan, and the plains of Azerbaijan in North-west Persia, and of Mosul in
Eastern ...

Grammar of the Dialects of the Vernacular Syriac

Author: Arthur John Maclean

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107648122

Page: 386

View: 552

This 1895 volume was created to provide a grammatical guide to the various dialects of the Eastern Syrians inhabiting the mountains of Kurdistan, the plains of Azerbaijan in north-west Persia, and Mosul in eastern Turkey. The text provides a practical guide to the various dialects used in these areas.

An Assyrian Grammar

In some cases the loan-word has been further modified in accordance with the
rules of Semitic grammar. Thus, the ... title of the Proto-Chaldean kings ciprat irba
was borrowed from the Semitic cipratu irbai or irbittu, “the four races” (of Syria).

An Assyrian Grammar

Author: Archibald Henry Sayce

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1108077927

Page: 210

View: 457

This 1872 grammar, using transliteration rather than cuneiform, covers the phonology, morphology, syntax and prosody of this ancient Semitic language.

The Elements of Anglo Saxon Grammar

I shall , therefore , insert the following letter without any apology , except for those
parts which apply immedi . ately to myself . tains the sacred text in the Hebrew ,
Samaritan , Syriac , Chaldean , Arabic , Persic , Æthiopic , Greek , and Latin ...

The Elements of Anglo Saxon Grammar

Author: Joseph Bosworth

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page: 332

View: 442