Chickenizing Farms and Food

Chickenizing Farms and Food explores the limits of some popular alternatives to industrial farming, including organic production, nonmeat diets, locavorism, and small-scale agriculture.

Chickenizing Farms and Food

Author: Ellen K. Silbergeld

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 1421420317

Page: 336

View: 968

Chickenizing Farms and Food explores the limits of some popular alternatives to industrial farming, including organic production, nonmeat diets, locavorism, and small-scale agriculture. Silbergeld’s provocative but pragmatic call to action is tempered by real challenges: how can we ensure a safe and accessible food system that can feed everyone, including consumers in developing countries with new tastes for western diets, without hurting workers, sickening consumers, and undermining some of our most powerful medicines?

Feeding the World Well

Sonya Atalay and Christine A. Hastorf, “Food, Meals, and Daily Activities: Food
Habitus at Neolithic Çatalhöyük,” American Antiquity 71, no. ... Ellen Silbergeld,
Chickenizing Farms and Food (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2016)
.

Feeding the World Well

Author: Alan M. Goldberg

Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press

ISBN: 1421439344

Page: 392

View: 732

Silbergeld, Paul B. Thompson, Paul Willis, Sylvia Wulf

Literary Bioethics

The intensification of industrial animal agriculture is traced in detail in Ellen
Silbergeld's Chickenizing Farms and Food, especially chapters 2 and 3. In fact,
regulations in animal agriculture and worker safety are both narrow and weak.

Literary Bioethics

Author: Maren Tova Linett

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 1479801259

Page: 224

View: 276

Uses literature to understand and remake our ethics regarding nonhuman animals, old human beings, disabled human beings, and cloned posthumans Literary Bioethics argues for literature as an untapped and essential site for the exploration of bioethics. Novels, Maren Tova Linett argues, present vividly imagined worlds in which certain values hold sway, casting new light onto those values; and the more plausible and well rendered readers find these imagined worlds, the more thoroughly we can evaluate the justice of those values. In an innovative set of readings, Linett thinks through the ethics of animal experimentation in H.G. Wells’s The Island of Doctor Moreau, explores the elimination of aging in Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World, considers the valuation of disabled lives in Flannery O’Connor’s The Violent Bear It Away, and questions the principles of humane farming through reading Kazuo Ishiguro’s Never Let Me Go. By analyzing novels published at widely spaced intervals over the span of a century, Linett offers snapshots of how we confront questions of value. In some cases the fictions are swayed by dominant devaluations of nonnormative or nonhuman lives, while in other cases they confirm the value of such lives by resisting instrumental views of their worth—views that influence, explicitly or implicitly, many contemporary bioethical discussions, especially about the value of disabled and nonhuman lives. Literary Bioethics grapples with the most fundamental questions of how we value different kinds of lives, and questions what those in power ought to be permitted to do with those lives as we gain unprecedented levels of technological prowess.

Pyrrhic Progress

3 Thomas P. Van Boeckel et al., “Global Trends in Antimicrobial Use in Food
Animals,” PNAS 112, no. 18 (2015): 5649–5650. 4 Ellen K. Silbergeld,
Chickenizing Farms and Food: How Industrial Meat Production Endangers
Workers, Animals, ...

Pyrrhic Progress

Author: Claas Kirchhelle

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 081359149X

Page: 372

View: 100

Pyrrhic Progress analyses over half a century of antibiotic use, regulation, and resistance in US and British food production. Mass-introduced after 1945, antibiotics helped revolutionize post-war agriculture. Food producers used antibiotics to prevent and treat disease, protect plants, preserve food, and promote animals’ growth. Many soon became dependent on routine antibiotic use to sustain and increase production. The resulting growth of antibiotic infrastructures came at a price. Critics blamed antibiotics for leaving dangerous residues in food, enabling bad animal welfare, and selecting for antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in bacteria, which could no longer be treated with antibiotics. Pyrrhic Progress reconstructs the complicated negotiations that accompanied this process of risk prioritization between consumers, farmers, and regulators on both sides of the Atlantic. Unsurprisingly, solutions differed: while Europeans implemented precautionary antibiotic restrictions to curb AMR, consumer concerns and cost-benefit assessments made US regulators focus on curbing drug residues in food. The result was a growing divergence of antibiotic stewardship and a rise of AMR. Kirchhelle’s comprehensive analysis of evolving non-human antibiotic use and the historical complexities of antibiotic stewardship provides important insights for current debates on the global burden of AMR.

Meat Makes People Powerful

... Obsession with Meat (New York: Basic Books, 2016); and Ellen K. Silbergeld,
Chickenizing Farms and Food: How Industrial Meat Production Endangers
Workers, Animals, and Consumers (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press,
2016).

Meat Makes People Powerful

Author: Wilson J. Warren

Publisher: University of Iowa Press

ISBN: 1609385551

Page: 264

View: 976

From large-scale cattle farming to water pollution, meat— more than any other food—has had an enormous impact on our environment. Historically, Americans have been among the most avid meat-eaters in the world, but long before that meat was not even considered a key ingredient in most civilizations’ diets. Labor historian Wilson Warren, who has studied the meat industry for more than a decade, provides this global history of meat to help us understand how it entered the daily diet, and at what costs and benefits to society. Spanning from the nineteenth century to current and future trends, Warren walks us through the economic theory of food, the discovery of protein, the Japanese eugenics debate around meat, and the environmental impact of livestock, among other topics. Through his comprehensive, multifaceted research, he provides readers with the political, economic, social, and cultural factors behind meat consumption over the last two centuries. With a special focus on East Asia, Meat Makes People Powerful reveals how national governments regulated and oversaw meat production, helping transform virtually vegetarian cultures into major meat consumers at record speed. As more and more Americans pay attention to the sources of the meat they consume, Warren’s compelling study will help them not only better understand the industry, but also make more informed personal choices. Providing an international perspective that will appeal to scholars and nutritionists alike, this timely examination will forever change the way you see the food on your plate.

In Defense of Farmers

Contextualizing the conversations about agriculture and rural societies within the disciplines of sociology, geography, economics, and anthropology, this volume addresses specific challenges farmers face in four countries: Bolivia, Brazil, ...

In Defense of Farmers

Author: Jane Gibson

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 1496215915

Page: 468

View: 938

Industrial agriculture is generally characterized as either the salvation of a growing, hungry, global population or as socially and environmentally irresponsible. Despite elements of truth in this polarization, it fails to focus on the particular vulnerabilities and potentials of industrial agriculture. Both representations obscure individual farmers, their families, their communities, and the risks they face from unpredictable local, national, and global conditions: fluctuating and often volatile production costs and crop prices; extreme weather exacerbated by climate change; complicated and changing farm policies; new production technologies and practices; water availability; inflation and debt; and rural community decline. Yet the future of industrial agriculture depends fundamentally on farmers’ decisions. In Defense of Farmers illuminates anew the critical role that farmers play in the future of agriculture and examines the social, economic, and environmental vulnerabilities of industrial agriculture, as well as its adaptations and evolution. Contextualizing the conversations about agriculture and rural societies within the disciplines of sociology, geography, economics, and anthropology, this volume addresses specific challenges farmers face in four countries: Bolivia, Brazil, Canada, and the United States. By concentrating on countries with the most sophisticated production technologies capable of producing the largest quantities of grains, soybeans, and animal proteins in the world, this volume focuses attention on the farmers whose labors, decision-making, and risk-taking throw into relief the implications and limitations of our global industrial food system. The case studies here acknowledge the agency of farmers and offer ways forward in the direction of sustainable agriculture.

Farmer s Advocate and Home Journal

Under the provisions of The Stallion Enrolment the Star : The protective foods of
growth and " We fear that most of the boys in Act ... They proand being enrolled
each year with the Department Chickenizing France . ... EXPERIMENTAL FARM
Soo advertisement of our Now Book promoting properties in egg fat and NOTES .

Farmer s Advocate and Home Journal

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page:

View: 354

Wallaces Farmer

Raised on a farm , one of my jobs as a youngster was to feed the chickens and
collect eggs . After being hen pecked ... The company took 4 cent a pound
chicken wings and transformed them into 90 cent a pound finger food . The beef
industry ...

Wallaces  Farmer

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page:

View: 232