Civil War on Western Waters

Story of the naval war on the Mississippi waterways was a keystone to the general strategy of the war and shows in detail the opposite ways in which the two commands approached and worked out their campaigns for control.

Civil War on Western Waters

Author: Fletcher Pratt

Publisher: New York : Holt

ISBN:

Page: 255

View: 518

Story of the naval war on the Mississippi waterways was a keystone to the general strategy of the war and shows in detail the opposite ways in which the two commands approached and worked out their campaigns for control.

Civil War Biographies from the Western Waters

Gratwick = Harry Gratwick, Mainers in the Civil War (Charleston, SC: History
Press, 2011). Hamersly = Lewis R. Hamersly, The Records of Living Officers of
the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps, Compiled from Official Sources, rev. ed.

Civil War Biographies from the Western Waters

Author: Myron J. Smith, Jr.

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 0786469676

Page: 340

View: 213

From 1861 to 1865, the Civil War raged along the great rivers of the Ohio and Mississippi valleys. While various Civil War biographies exist, none have been devoted exclusively to participants in the Western river war as waged down the Mississippi to the mouth of the Red River, and up the Ohio, the Tennessee and the Cumberland. Based on the Official Records, county histories, newspapers and internet sources, this is the first work to profile personnel involved in the fighting on these great streams. Included in this biographical encyclopedia are Union and Confederate naval officers down to the rank of mate; enlisted sailors who won the Medal of Honor, or otherwise distinguished themselves or who wrote accounts of life on the gunboats; army officers and leaders who played a direct role in combat along Western waters; political officials who influenced river operations; civilian steamboat captains and pilots who participated in wartime logistics; and civilian contractors directly involved, including shipbuilders, dam builders, naval constructors and munitions experts. Each of the biographies includes (where known) birth, death and residence data; unit organization or ship; involvement in the river war; pre- and post-war careers; and source documentation. Hundreds of individuals are given their first historic recognition.

Joseph Brown and His Civil War Ironclads

The West and Western Rivers in Civil War literature refers generally to the
Western theatre of operations. ... Hair, Gazetteer of Madison County, 118; “John
Lenthal” “in Smith, Civil War Biographies from the Western Waters, 140–141; “
George T.

Joseph Brown and His Civil War Ironclads

Author: Myron J. Smith, Jr.

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 0786495766

Page: 396

View: 603

Well known in his time though now forgotten, Joseph Brown is a quintessential representative of mid-19th Century Midwestern economic and political success. A Scottish immigrant to Alton, Illinois, he made his pre-Civil War fortune as a miller and steamboat master, dabbling in riverboat design and small town politics on the side. When the war erupted, he employed his connections (including a friendship with Abraham Lincoln) to obtain contracts for the construction of three stopgap ironclads for the U.S. War Department, the Chillicothe, Indianola, and Tuscumbia. These vessels, often described as failures, were active in some of the most ferocious river fighting of the 1863 Vicksburg campaign, with one, the Chillicothe, employed on the Red River in 1864. After the war, ""Capt. Joe,"" as he was nicknamed, became a railroad executive and was elected the 25th mayor of St. Louis, MO. This work is the first devoted to his life and career, as well as to the construction and operational histories of his trio of controversial warships.

The USS Carondelet

The USS Carondelet had a revolutionary ship design and was the most active of all the Union's Civil War river ironclads.

The USS Carondelet

Author: Myron J. Smith, Jr.

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 0786456094

Page: 288

View: 545

The USS Carondelet had a revolutionary ship design and was the most active of all the Union’s Civil War river ironclads. From Fort Henry through the siege of Vicksburg and from the Red River campaign through the Battle of Nashville, the gunboat was prominent in war legend and literature. This history draws on the letters of Ensign Scott Dyer Jordan and Rear Adm. Henry Walke’s memoirs.

American Reference Books Annual 2019 Edition

In Ironclad Captains of the Civil War, Smith profiles 158 captains who served in
the Union and Confederate Navies, building on his previous works Civil War
Biographies from the Western Waters (see ARBA 2015, entry 258) and Joseph
Brown ...

American Reference Books Annual  2019 Edition

Author: Juneal M. Chenoweth

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 1440869146

Page: 552

View: 615

Read professional, fair reviews by practicing academic, public, and school librarians and subject-area specialists that will enable you to make the best choices from among the latest reference resources. • Provides reviews of print and electronic resources, showcasing a wide spectrum for users to consider • Presents unbiased evaluations that allow users to make their own decisions on the suitability of a given resource for their patrons' needs • Gives users access to reviews containing critical, relevant, and timely information from librarians and subject-area specialists

Andrew Foote

The life and career of one of the U.S. Navy's first admirals who "considered himself first and foremost a staunch Christian and an agent of divine will."--Jacket.

Andrew Foote

Author: Spencer Tucker

Publisher: Naval Inst Press

ISBN:

Page: 259

View: 488

The life and career of one of the U.S. Navy's first admirals who "considered himself first and foremost a staunch Christian and an agent of divine will."--Jacket.

Confederate Naval Forces on Western Waters

The history of Confederate naval forces on the western waters is a story of desperation, intrigue, ineptitude, and humiliating defeats, interspersed with moments of courage, innovation, resourcefulness, and a few hard-earned victories.

Confederate Naval Forces on Western Waters

Author: R. Thomas Campbell

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 9780786464173

Page: 272

View: 451

No body of water was more vital to the Confederacy's efforts in the Civil War than the Mississippi River and its tributaries. Though the Confederate Congress declared the Mississippi free and open to all states north and south, the Union launched plans for an effective blockade of the 1700 miles of Southern coastline, coupled with a strong naval and army thrust down the Mississippi Valley from Cairo, Illinois, to the Gulf of Mexico. To defend the river and to prevent Union forces from advancing, the South would require a strong naval force. There was only one problem with the strategy: The Confederacy had no navy. On February 25, 1861, Confederate president Jefferson Davis nominated Stephen R. Mallory to be secretary of the newly formed Confederate States Navy. Mallory faced significant obstacles--no shipyards, few skilled craftsmen and machinists, and a lack of production facilities to process raw materials. Mallory was able to overcome the many shortcomings to build a formidable navy, but the efforts in the Mississippi theater were hamstrung by a disjointed command structure and interservice bickering. Despite these problems, the Confederate Navy contested the Union forces at every turn. The history of Confederate naval forces on the western waters is a story of desperation, intrigue, ineptitude, and humiliating defeats, interspersed with moments of courage, innovation, resourcefulness, and a few hard-earned victories.

War on the Waters

Short Hills, N.J.: Burford Books, 2002. Johnson, Ludwell H. Red River Campaign:
Politics and Cotton in the Civil War. Baltimore: ... Through the Howling
Wilderness: The 1864 Red River Campaign and Union Failure in the West.
Knoxville: ...

War on the Waters

Author: James M. McPherson

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 0807837326

Page: 288

View: 138

Although previously undervalued for their strategic impact because they represented only a small percentage of total forces, the Union and Confederate navies were crucial to the outcome of the Civil War. In War on the Waters, James M. McPherson has crafted an enlightening, at times harrowing, and ultimately thrilling account of the war's naval campaigns and their military leaders. McPherson recounts how the Union navy's blockade of the Confederate coast, leaky as a sieve in the war's early months, became increasingly effective as it choked off vital imports and exports. Meanwhile, the Confederate navy, dwarfed by its giant adversary, demonstrated daring and military innovation. Commerce raiders sank Union ships and drove the American merchant marine from the high seas. Southern ironclads sent several Union warships to the bottom, naval mines sank many more, and the Confederates deployed the world's first submarine to sink an enemy vessel. But in the end, it was the Union navy that won some of the war's most important strategic victories--as an essential partner to the army on the ground at Fort Donelson, Vicksburg, Port Hudson, Mobile Bay, and Fort Fisher, and all by itself at Port Royal, Fort Henry, New Orleans, and Memphis.

Selected Reference Books

The lost cause ; a new southern history of the war of the confederates . . . incl . life
of Jefferson Davis . . . New ed . ... Naval scenes and reminiscences of the civil
war in the United States on the southern and western waters . . . 1861 , 1862 and
 ...

Selected Reference Books

Author: New York State Library. School

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page: 215

View: 783

Ellet s Brigade

... began for me while writing the biographies of two Civil War admirals , David
Dixon Porter and David Glasgow Farragut ... These unusual arrangements led to
many disputes and disruptions on the western rivers that began the day
Secretary ...

Ellet s Brigade

Author: Chester G. Hearn

Publisher: LSU Press

ISBN: 9780807131862

Page: 312

View: 811

Soon after the start of the Civil War, during the naval buildup on the central Mississippi River, celebrated civil engineer Charles Ellet, Jr., formed the Ram Fleet under U.S. secretary of war Edwin M. Stanton. Perhaps the most bizarre unit organized by the Union, the rams were shunned by both the army and navy as superfluous instruments of war. However, on June 6, 1862, they proved their worth by defeating the Confederate River Defense Fleet ironclads at Memphis while the U.S. Navy simply watched. In this lively study, Chester G. Hearn details the formation and wartime exploits of Ellet's fleet, reviving the history of this fascinating but forgotten brigade.

The Red River Campaign of 1864 and the Loss by the Confederacy of the Civil War

Videocassette. Glatthaar, Joseph T. Partners in Command: The Relationships
Between Leaders in the Civil War. New York: The Free Press, ¡994. Gosnell, H.
Allen. Guns on the Western Waters. ... Time-Life Books, ¡985. Johansson, David
H.

The Red River Campaign of 1864 and the Loss by the Confederacy of the Civil War

Author: Michael J. Forsyth

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 1476615721

Page: 192

View: 802

The Union Army’s Red River Campaign began on March 12, 1864, with a two-pronged attack aimed at gaining control of Shreveport, Louisiana. It lasted until May 22, 1864, when, after suffering significant casualties, the Union army retreated to Simmesport, Louisiana. The campaign was an attempt to prevent Confederate alliance with the French in Mexico, deny supplies to Confederate forces, and secure vast quantities of Louisiana and Texas cotton for Northern mills. With this examination of Confederate leadership and how it affected the Red River Campaign, the author argues against the standard assumption that the campaign had no major effect on the outcome of the war. In fact, the South had—and lost—an excellent opportunity to inflict a decisive defeat that might have changed the course of history. With this campaign as an ideal example, the politics of military decision-making in general are also analyzed.

The Timberclads in the Civil War

The book focuses on the activities of these wooden warriors while providing context for the greater war, including accounts of their famous commanders, their roles in both large and small battles, ship-to-ship combat, and support for the ...

The Timberclads in the Civil War

Author: Myron J. Smith, Jr.

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 9780786451951

Page: 560

View: 915

In the most detailed history ever of Union warships on the western waters of the Civil War, the author recounts the exploits of the timberclad ships Lexington, Tyler, and Conestoga. Converted to warships from commercial steamboats at the beginning of the conflict, the three formed the core of the North’s Western Flotilla, later the Mississippi Squadron. The book focuses on the activities of these wooden warriors while providing context for the greater war, including accounts of their famous commanders, their roles in both large and small battles, ship-to-ship combat, and support for the armies of Gen. U.S. Grant and Gen. William T. Sherman.

The Civil War in the West

By the time of the Civil War, a fairly good system of embankments lined long
stretches of the river, although with ... It has been estimated that by 1860, 299
riverboats on the Western waters were damaged and another 120 totally
destroyed.

The Civil War in the West

Author: Earl J. Hess

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 0807869848

Page: 416

View: 195

The Western theater of the Civil War, rich in agricultural resources and manpower and home to a large number of slaves, stretched 600 miles north to south and 450 miles east to west from the Appalachians to the Mississippi. If the South lost the West, there would be little hope of preserving the Confederacy. Earl J. Hess's comprehensive study of how Federal forces conquered and held the West examines the geographical difficulties of conducting campaigns in a vast land, as well as the toll irregular warfare took on soldiers and civilians alike. Hess balances a thorough knowledge of the battle lines with a deep understanding of what was happening within the occupied territories. In addition to a mastery of logistics, Union victory hinged on making use of black manpower and developing policies for controlling constant unrest while winning campaigns. Effective use of technology, superior resource management, and an aggressive confidence went hand in hand with Federal success on the battlefield. In the end, Confederates did not have the manpower, supplies, transportation potential, or leadership to counter Union initiatives in this critical arena.

Battle Chronicles of the Civil War

This listing of books on the strategy, tactics, campaigns, battles, and military
leaders of the Civil War is divided into three ... (1942–44) Gosnell, H. Allen, Guns
on the Western Waters: The Story of River Gunboats in the Civil War (1949) 179 ...

Battle Chronicles of the Civil War

Author: James M. McPherson

Publisher: Macmillan Library Reference

ISBN: 9780028972763

Page: 215

View: 928

Volumes 1 through 5 cover the major battles of the Civil War chronologically from 1861 to 1865. Volume 6 contains biographies of key figures in this conflict.

The Fight for the Yazoo August 1862 July 1864

Myron J. Smith, Jr., CSS Arkansas: A Confederate Ironclad on Western Waters (
Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 2011). ... AR: Vicksburg Civil War Centennial
Commemorative Commission, 1963), 281; John D. Milligan, Gunboats Down the
Mississippi (Annap- olis, ... Web, http://www.txgenweb 6.org/txnavarro/
biographies/b/brown_isaa c_newton.htm (accessed July 13, 2009); Henry Walke,
Naval Scenes and ...

The Fight for the Yazoo  August 1862  July 1864

Author: Myron J. Smith, Jr.

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 0786491108

Page: 460

View: 496

Following the loss of the CSS Arkansas in early August 1862, Union and Confederate eyes turned to the Yazoo River, which formed the developing northern flank for the South’s fortress at Vicksburg, Mississippi. For much of the next year, Federal efforts to capture the citadel focused on possession of that stream. Huge battles and mighty expeditions were launched (Chickasaw Bayou, Yazoo Pass, Steele’s Bayou) from that direction, but the city, guarded by stout defenses, swamps, and motivated defenders, could not be turned. Finally, Union troops ran down the Mississippi and came up from the south and the river defenses and the bastion itself were taken from the east. From July 1863 to August 1864, sporadic Confederate resistance necessitated continued Federal attention. This book recounts the whole story.

The Great Railway Revolution

While New York City quickly became the centre of the steamboat industry, rivers
and bays along the whole Eastern seaboard from Maine to Florida were soon
filled with steamers. ... proved the most important factor in the great industrial
development of that region from 1815 to the eve of the civil war.'8 By 1820,
sixtynine steamships were navigating the western rivers and the total peaked at
727 in 1855, ...

The Great Railway Revolution

Author: Christian Wolmar

Publisher: Atlantic Books Ltd

ISBN: 0857897799

Page: 300

View: 290

In the 1830s, The United States underwent a second revolution. The opening of the Baltimore & Ohio line, the first American railroad, set in motion a process which, by the end of the century, would enmesh the vast country in a latticework of railroad lines, small-town stations and magisterial termini, built and controlled the biggest corporations in America. By the middle of the twentieth century, however, as the automobile and the aeroplane came to dominate American journey-making, the historic importance of the railroads began to be erased from America's hearts and minds. In The Great Railway Revolution, Christian Wolmar tells us the extraordinary one-hundred-and-eighty-year story of the rise, fall and ultimate shattering of the greatest of all American endeavours, of technological triumph and human tragedy, of visionary pioneers and venal and rapacious railway barons. He also argues that while America has largely disowned this heritage, now is the time to celebrate, reclaim and reinstate it. The growth of the US railroads was much more than just a revolution in mode, speed and convenience. They united the far-flung components of a vast and disparate country and supercharged the economic development that fuelled its rise to world-power status. America was created by its railroads and the massive expansion of trade, industry and freedom of communication that they engendered came to be an integral part of the American dream itself.