Crime and Criminals of Victorian London

In this comprehensive work, familiar Dickensian themes of grisly murders and ragged street urchins are joined by other dramatic cases, which show patterns of crime and illustrate the causes and effects of changes in criminal law.

Crime and Criminals of Victorian London

Author: Adrian Gray

Publisher:

ISBN: 9781860773921

Page: 180

View: 633

In this fascinating exploration of the seedy underside of Victorian London, Adrian Gray provides a rich picture of the variety of criminal activity in the city.

Crime and Criminals of Victorian England

Adrian Gray's thrilling book recounts the classic murders, by knife and poison, but it also covers much more, taking the reader into less familiar parts of Victorian life, uncovering the wicked, the vengeful, the foolish and the hopeless ...

Crime and Criminals of Victorian England

Author: Adrian Gray

Publisher: The History Press

ISBN: 075249676X

Page: 224

View: 695

Dark and foggy Victorian streets, the murderous madman, the arsenic-laced evening meal - we all think we know the realities of Victorian crime. Adrian Gray's thrilling book recounts the classic murders, by knife and poison, but it also covers much more, taking the reader into less familiar parts of Victorian life, uncovering the wicked, the vengeful, the foolish and the hopeless amongst the criminal world of the nineteenth century. Here you will encounter the women who sold their children, corrupt bankers, smugglers, highwaymen, the first terrorists, bloodthirsty mutineers and petty thieves; you will meet the 'mesmerists' who fooled a credulous public, and even the Salvation Army band that went to gaol. Gray journeys through the cities, villages, lanes, mills and sailing ships of the period, ranging from Carlisle to Cornwall, showing how our laws today have been shaped by what the Victorians considered acceptable - or made illegal

Capital Offenses

By 1900 crime appears as a distinctively modern problem, requiring large-scale solutions and government intervention in place of an older approach rooted in personal morality or philanthropic paternalism.".

Capital Offenses

Author: Simon Joyce

Publisher: University of Virginia Press

ISBN: 9780813921808

Page: 267

View: 510

By 1900 crime appears as a distinctively modern problem, requiring large-scale solutions and government intervention in place of an older approach rooted in personal morality or philanthropic paternalism.".

Criminal Conversations

Victorian Crimes, Social Panic, and Moral Outrage Judith Rowbotham, Kim
Stevenson, Senior Lecturer in Law and Director of Solon Kim Stevenson. 9. Ibid.
10. Mayhew, London Labour, 204–5. 11. Ibid., 134. 12. Mayhew, London Prisons,
45.

Criminal Conversations

Author: Judith Rowbotham

Publisher: Ohio State University Press

ISBN: 0814209734

Page: 318

View: 220

"The essays in this book set out to explore the ways in which Victorians used newspapers to identify the causes of bad behavior and its impacts, and the ways in which they tried to "distance" criminals and those guilty of "bad" behavior from the ordinary members of society, including identification of them as different according to race of sexual orientation. It also explores how threats from within "normal" society were depicted and the panic that issues like "baby-farming" caused." "Victorian alarm was about crimes and bad behavior which they saw as new or unique to their period - but which were not new then and which, in slightly different dress, are still causing panic today. What is striking about the essays in this collection are the ways in which they echo contemporary concerns about crime and bad behavior, including panics about "new" types of crime. This has implications for modern understandings of how society needs to understand crime, demonstrating that while there are changes over time, there are also important continuities."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Murder by the Book

Murder By the Book combines this thrilling true-crime story with an illuminating account of the rise of the novel form and the battle for its early soul among the most famous writers of the time.

Murder by the Book

Author: Claire Harman

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0525520406

Page: 272

View: 924

"Enthralling . . . A page-turner that can hold its own with any one of the many murder-minded podcasts out there." —Jezebel From the acclaimed biographer--the fascinating, little-known story of a Victorian-era murder that rocked literary London, leading Charles Dickens, William Thackeray, and Queen Victoria herself to wonder: Can a novel kill? In May 1840, Lord William Russell, well known in London's highest social circles, was found with his throat cut. The brutal murder had the whole city talking. The police suspected Russell's valet, Courvoisier, but the evidence was weak. The missing clue, it turned out, lay in the unlikeliest place: what Courvoisier had been reading. In the years just before the murder, new printing methods had made books cheap and abundant, the novel form was on the rise, and suddenly everyone was reading. The best-selling titles were the most sensational true-crime stories. Even Dickens and Thackeray, both at the beginning of their careers, fell under the spell of these tales--Dickens publicly admiring them, Thackeray rejecting them. One such phenomenon was William Harrison Ainsworth's Jack Sheppard, the story of an unrepentant criminal who escaped the gallows time and again. When Lord William's murderer finally confessed his guilt, he would cite this novel in his defense. Murder By the Book combines this thrilling true-crime story with an illuminating account of the rise of the novel form and the battle for its early soul among the most famous writers of the time. It is superbly researched, vividly written, and captivating from first to last.

London s Shadows

This is a new and fresh portrait of London at the height of Victoria's reign, revealing the dark underbelly of the city's history.

London s Shadows

Author: Drew D. Gray

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 1847252427

Page: 280

View: 934

In 1888 London was the capital of the greatest empire the world had ever known. In the West End the glittering lamps illuminated the homes of the rich and the emporiums that displayed the countless luxuries that they enjoyed. This was a city that reflected the wealth of the Victorian age, but there was also a dark side to Victorian London: vice and crime, degradation, poverty and despair. When an unknown killer began murdering prostitutes in Whitechapel the horrors of the East End were brought out of the shadows. In 1888 London was the capital of the most powerful empire the world had ever known and the largest city in Europe. In the West End a new city was growing, populated by the middle classes, the epitome of 'Victorian values'. Across the city the situation was very different. The East End of London had long been considered a nether world, a dark and dangerous place, and it embodied many of the fears of respectable Victorians. Using the Whitechapel murders of Jack the Ripper as a focal point, London's Shadows explores prostitution and poverty, revolutionary politics and Irish terrorism, immigration, the criminal underclass and the developing role of the Metropolitan Police. It also considers how the sensationalist New Journalism took the news of the Ripper murders to the furthest corners of the Empire. This is a new and fresh portrait of London at the height of Victoria's reign, revealing the dark underbelly of the city's history.

Burglars and Bobbies

This book examines the reality of crime levels within the Metropolis, the extent to which they differed from public perception, and the manner in which they changed over time.

Burglars and Bobbies

Author: Gregory J. Durston

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN: 144384344X

Page: 305

View: 972

The early decades of the nineteenth century witnessed an apparent deterioration in public order and security in the London area. This continued to worsen until the middle of the century. During this period, the Metropolitan Police was established, ostensibly transforming policing in the capital. By the 1860s, crime seemed to be falling rapidly and continued to do so until the end of the century, so that it was no longer normally a subject that occasioned acute political concern. This book examines the reality of crime levels within the Metropolis, the extent to which they differed from public perception, and the manner in which they changed over time. It considers how the police might have had an impact on public security after 1829, the use of the ‘broken windows’ paradigm for crime control in an historical context, and the extent to which the police can take credit for the post-1860 improvement in offending levels and order. However, it also discusses other factors, both economic and social, that might explain these developments. At the same time, the book charts the general history and development of urban policing in London during the nineteenth century, the complicated and sometimes competing mixture of political and financial concerns, operational priorities, public and ‘expert’ opinion that it reflected, and the controversies that it engendered. In particular, it discusses the ‘traditional’ form of policing that was replaced in 1829, and why this occurred; the importance of foot patrol to the new force, with its strengths and weaknesses; the re-emergence of detective policing; and the legal powers and judicial support available to officers in the capital. Very importantly, this study also considers the problems thrown up by the new style of policing, its potential for abuse, and the public resistance that this sometimes encouraged.

Unconscious Crime

Mental Absence and Criminal Responsibility in Victorian London Joel Peter
Eigen. bridge, Mass., 1990); Bruce Haley, The Healthy Body and Victorian
Culture (Cambridge, 1978), and, with specific reference to criminal defenses,
Roger Smith, ...

Unconscious Crime

Author: Joel Peter Eigen

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 080188148X

Page: 248

View: 319

A sleepwalking, homicidal nursemaid; a "morally vacant" juvenile poisoner; a man driven to arson by a "lesion of the will"; an articulate and poised man on trial for assault who, while conducting his own defense, undergoes a profound personality change and becomes a wild and delusional "alter." These people are not characters from a mystery novelist's vivid imagination, but rather defendants who were tried at the Old Bailey, London's central criminal court, in the mid-nineteenth century. In Unconscious Crime, Joel Peter Eigen explores these and other cases in which defendants did not conform to any of the Victorian legal system's existing definitions of insanity yet displayed convincing evidence of mental aberration. Instead, they were—or claimed to be—"missing," "absent," or "unconscious": lucid, though unaware of their actions. Based on extensive research in the Old Bailey Sessions Papers (verbatim courtroom narratives taken down in shorthand during the trial and sold on the street the following day), Eigen's book reveals a growing estrangement between law and medicine over the legal concept of the Person as a rational and purposeful actor with a clear understanding of consequences. The McNaughtan Rules of l843 had formalized the Victorian insanity plea, guiding the courts in cases of alleged delusion and derangement. But as Eigen makes clear in the cases he discovered, even though defense attorneys attempted to broaden the definition of insanity to include mental absence, the courts and physicians who testified as experts were wary of these novel challenges to the idea of human agency and responsibility. Combining the colorful intrigue of courtroom drama and the keen insights of social history, Unconscious Crime depicts Victorian England's legal and medical cultures confronting a new understanding of human behavior, and provocatively suggests these trials represent the earliest incarnation of double consciousness and multiple personality disorder.

The Victorian Master Criminal

7 (London: The Waverly Book Co., 1910). Adam, H. L., Police Work from Within:
With some reflections upon women, the law and lawyers (London: Holden and
Hardingham, 1914). Anon., The Master Criminal. The Life Story of Charles Peace
, ...

The Victorian Master Criminal

Author: David C Hanrahan

Publisher: The History Press

ISBN: 0750968931

Page: 224

View: 631

On 2 August 1876, a young policeman named Constable Nicholas Cock was shot dead while walking ‘the beat’ at Whalley Range, Manchester. A few months later, on the evening of 29 November 1876, Arthur Dyson, an engineer, was murdered in his own backyard at Banner Cross, Sheffield. Charles Peace was Victorian Britain’s most infamous cat burglar and murderer. He was a complex character: ruthless, devious, dangerous, charming, intelligent and creative. Mrs Katherine Dyson identified him as the murderer of her husband, and as the police searched the country for him, Peace was living a life of luxury under another identity in London. One of these murders became the most notorious and scandalous case of the Victorian age, with a tale of illicit romance and a nationwide hunt for Britain’s most wanted man; the other was to become a landmark in British legal history. Although no one suspected a link between them, these two sensational murder cases would, in the end, turn out to be tied together in a way that shocked Victorian society to its core.

Combating London s Criminal Class

offenders could not be held fully responsible for their crimes, as they were the
result of degenerate stock.116 As shown in Chapter 3, Lombrosian ideas were ...
121 Phillip Smith, Policing Victorian London, London: Greenwood Press, 1985, p.

Combating London   s Criminal Class

Author: Matthew Bach

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1350156221

Page: 208

View: 264

The criminal class was seen as a violent, immoral and dissolute sub-section of Victorian London's population. Making their living through crime and openly hostile to society, the lives of these criminals were characterised by drunkenness, theft and brutality. This book explores whether this criminal class did indeed truly exist, and the effectivenessof measures brought against it. Tracing the notion of the criminal class from as early as the 16th century, this book questions whether this sub-section of society did indeed exist. Bach discusses how unease of London's notorious rookeries, the frenzy of media attention and a [word deleted here] panic among the general public enforced and encouraged the fear of the 'criminal class' and perpetuated state efforts of social control. Using the Habitual Criminals Bills, this book explores how and why this legislation was introduced to deal with repeat offenders, and assesses how successful its repressive measures were. Demonstrating how the Metropolitan Police Force and London's Magistrates were not always willing tools of the British state, this book uses court records and private correspondence to reveal how inconsistent and unsuccessful many of these measures and punishments were, and calls into question the notion that the state gained control over recidivists in this period.

Crime Control and Everyday Life in the Victorian City

This new study shows how the history of British crime, policing, and criminal justice was shaped in cities like Leeds, Liverpool, and Manchester, detailing how Victorian police forces were organized, how they sought to deal with crime and ...

Crime Control and Everyday Life in the Victorian City

Author: David Churchill

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0198797842

Page: 304

View: 756

The history of modern crime control is usually presented as a narrative of how the state wrested control over the governance of crime from the civilian public. Most accounts trace the decline of a participatory, discretionary culture of crime control in the early modern era, and its replacement by a centralized, bureaucratic system of responding to offending. The formation of the 'new' professional police forces in the nineteenth century is central to this narrative: henceforth, it is claimed, the priorities of criminal justice were to be set by the state, as ordinary people lost what authority they had once exercised over dealing with offenders. This book challenges this established view, and presents a fundamental reinterpretation of changes to crime control in the age of the new police. It breaks new ground by providing a highly detailed, empirical analysis of everyday crime control in Victorian provincial cities - revealing the tremendous activity which ordinary people displayed in responding to crime - alongside a rich survey of police organization and policing in practice. With unique conceptual clarity, it seeks to reorient modern criminal justice history away from its established preoccupation with state systems of policing and punishment, and move towards a more nuanced analysis of the governance of crime. More widely, the book provides a unique and valuable vantage point from which to rethink the role of civil society and the state in modern governance, the nature of agency and authority in Victorian England, and the historical antecedents of pluralized modes of crime control which characterize contemporary society.

Unsolved Murders in Victorian and Edwardian London

For this collection, Jonathan Oates has selected over 20 varied and intriguing cases from the late 1830s to just before the Great War.

Unsolved Murders in Victorian and Edwardian London

Author: Jonathan Oates

Publisher: Wharncliffe Books

ISBN: 9781845630454

Page: 186

View: 774

Jonathan Oates has selected over 20 varied and intriguing unsolved murder cases from the late 1830s to just before the Great War. Among them are the headless body found in a bag at Waterloo Bridge, the pregnant maid who was bludgeoned to death and the barmaid whose corpse rode the train from Hounslow to Waterloo.

Histories of Crime

'The Fall of the Sessions Paper: Criminal Trial and the Popular Press in Late
EighteenthCentury London', Criminal ... of the Victorian underworld see
especially D. Green (1986) People of the Rookery: A Pauper Community in
Victorian London ...

Histories of Crime

Author: Anne-Marie Kilday

Publisher: Macmillan International Higher Education

ISBN: 1137135727

Page: 224

View: 903

Providing a rounded and coherent history of crime and the law spanning the past 400 years, Histories of Crime explores the evolution of attitudes towards crime and criminality over time. Bringing together contributions from internationally acknowledged experts, the book highlights themes, current issues and key debates in the history of deviance and bad behaviour, including: ■ marital cruelty and adultery ■ infanticide ■ murder ■ the underworld ■ blasphemy and moral crimes ■ fraud and white-collar crime ■ the death penalty and punishment. Individual case studies of violent and non-violent crime are used to explore the human means and motives behind criminal practice. Through these, the book illuminates society's wider attitudes and fears about criminal behaviour and the way in which these influence the law and legal system over time. This fascinating book is essential reading for students and teachers of history, sociology and criminology, as well as anyone interested in Britain's criminal past.

London s Underworld

This fascinating book illustrates how crime in the capital has evolved from the extreme violence of the early eighteenth century to the vastly more complex and lucrative, but no less brutal, gangland of today.

London s Underworld

Author: Fergus Linnane

Publisher: Pavilion Books

ISBN: 1911042033

Page: 372

View: 121

London’s Underworld takes us on the nightmarish last journeys of condemned criminals to the gallows at Tyburn. We enter death-trap eighteenth century prisons, one of which the novelist Henry Fielding described as a ‘prototype of hell’. We walk the crowded streets of Victorian London with its swarms of prostitutes and follow the ingenious villains who carried out the first great train robbery in 1854. We see the rise and fall of the interwar racecourse gangs and the bloody battle for control of the Wes End. This fascinating book illustrates how crime in the capital has evolved from the extreme violence of the early eighteenth century to the vastly more complex and lucrative, but no less brutal, gangland of today.

Crime and Punishment in Victorian London

By mid-century, the 200 capital crimes on the books in 1800 had been reduced to
a mere handful. Criminals no longer upped their game on the grounds that they '
might as well be hung for a sheep as a lamb' and juries were less likely to let off ...

Crime and Punishment in Victorian London

Author: Ross Gilfillan

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN: 1473834724

Page: 256

View: 863

Discover the seamy history of nineteenth-century England that has inspired countless crime novels and films. Victorian London: All over the city, watches, purses, and handkerchiefs disappear from pockets; goods migrate from warehouses, off docks, and out of shop windows. Burglaries are rife, shoplifting is carried on in West End stores, and people fall victim to all kinds of ingenious swindles. Pornographers proliferate and an estimated eighty thousand prostitutes operate on the city’s streets. Even worse, the vulnerable are robbed in dark alleys or garroted, a new kind of mugging in which the victim is half-strangled from behind while being stripped of his possessions. This history takes you to nineteenth-century London’s grimy rookeries, home to thousands of the city’s poorest and most desperate residents. Explore the crime-ridden slums, flash houses, and gin palaces from a unique street-level view—and meet the people who inhabited them.

Child Sexual Abuse in Victorian England

Providing a much-needed insight into Victorian attitudes, including that of Christian morality, this book makes a distinctive contribution to the history of crime, social welfare and the family.

Child Sexual Abuse in Victorian England

Author: Louise Ainsley Jackson

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 0415226503

Page: 209

View: 256

Child Sexual Abuse in Victorian England is the first detailed investigation of the way that child abuse was discovered, debated, diagnosed and dealt with in the Victorian and Edwardian periods. The focus is placed on the child and his or her experience of court procedure and welfare practice, thereby providing a unique and important evaluation of the treatment of children in the courtroom. Through a series of case studies, including analyses of the criminal courts, the author examines the impact of legislation at grass roots level, and demonstrates why this was a formative period in the legal definition of sexual abuse. Providing a much-needed insight into Victorian attitudes, including that of Christian morality, this book makes a distinctive contribution to the history of crime, social welfare and the family. It also offers a valuable critique of current work on the history of children's homes and institutions, arguing that the inter-personal relationships of children and carers is a crucial area of study.

The Good Old Days

Gilda O'Neill explores the teeming underbelly dwelling in the fog-bound streets, rat-infested slums, common lodging houses, boozers, penny gaffs and brothels in the heart of the greatest empire that the world has ever seen, revealing that ...

The Good Old Days

Author: Gilda O'Neill

Publisher:

ISBN: 9780141019383

Page: 286

View: 324

The nineteenth century was a time of growing awareness of the existence of an impoverished underclass - a terrifying demi-monde of criminals, tarts and no-hope low lifes. Uniformed gangs would 'hold their street' in violent clashes with opposing mobs, and foreign seamen would set up home close to the massive wealth of bonded warehouses - everyone knew about the alien hordes' propensity for making a living from thievery, opium, and whores . . . Gilda O'Neill explores the teeming underbelly dwelling in the fog-bound streets, rat-infested slums, common lodging houses, boozers, penny gaffs and brothels in the heart of the greatest empire that the world has ever seen, revealing that Victoria's was actually a most unruly reign.