Crime and Criminals of Victorian London

In this fascinating exploration of the seedy underside of London life in the Victorian era, Adrian Gray provides a rich picture of the sheer variety of criminal activity in the city.

Crime and Criminals of Victorian London

Author: Adrian Gray

Publisher:

ISBN: 9781860773921

Page: 180

View: 394

In this fascinating exploration of the seedy underside of Victorian London, Adrian Gray provides a rich picture of the variety of criminal activity in the city.

Crime and Criminals of Victorian England

Adrian Gray's thrilling book recounts the classic murders, by knife and poison, but it also covers much more, taking the reader into less familiar parts of Victorian life, uncovering the wicked, the vengeful, the foolish and the hopeless ...

Crime and Criminals of Victorian England

Author: Adrian Gray

Publisher: The History Press

ISBN: 075249676X

Page: 224

View: 239

Dark and foggy Victorian streets, the murderous madman, the arsenic-laced evening meal - we all think we know the realities of Victorian crime. Adrian Gray's thrilling book recounts the classic murders, by knife and poison, but it also covers much more, taking the reader into less familiar parts of Victorian life, uncovering the wicked, the vengeful, the foolish and the hopeless amongst the criminal world of the nineteenth century. Here you will encounter the women who sold their children, corrupt bankers, smugglers, highwaymen, the first terrorists, bloodthirsty mutineers and petty thieves; you will meet the 'mesmerists' who fooled a credulous public, and even the Salvation Army band that went to gaol. Gray journeys through the cities, villages, lanes, mills and sailing ships of the period, ranging from Carlisle to Cornwall, showing how our laws today have been shaped by what the Victorians considered acceptable - or made illegal

Capital Offenses

By 1900 crime appears as a distinctively modern problem, requiring large-scale solutions and government intervention in place of an older approach rooted in personal morality or philanthropic paternalism.".

Capital Offenses

Author: Simon Joyce

Publisher: University of Virginia Press

ISBN: 9780813921808

Page: 267

View: 500

By 1900 crime appears as a distinctively modern problem, requiring large-scale solutions and government intervention in place of an older approach rooted in personal morality or philanthropic paternalism.".

Criminal Conversations

Victorian Crimes, Social Panic, and Moral Outrage Judith Rowbotham, Kim
Stevenson, Senior Lecturer in Law and Director of Solon Kim Stevenson. 9. Ibid.
10. Mayhew, London Labour, 204–5. 11. Ibid., 134. 12. Mayhew, London Prisons,
45.

Criminal Conversations

Author: Judith Rowbotham

Publisher: Ohio State University Press

ISBN: 0814209734

Page: 318

View: 730

"The essays in this book set out to explore the ways in which Victorians used newspapers to identify the causes of bad behavior and its impacts, and the ways in which they tried to "distance" criminals and those guilty of "bad" behavior from the ordinary members of society, including identification of them as different according to race of sexual orientation. It also explores how threats from within "normal" society were depicted and the panic that issues like "baby-farming" caused." "Victorian alarm was about crimes and bad behavior which they saw as new or unique to their period - but which were not new then and which, in slightly different dress, are still causing panic today. What is striking about the essays in this collection are the ways in which they echo contemporary concerns about crime and bad behavior, including panics about "new" types of crime. This has implications for modern understandings of how society needs to understand crime, demonstrating that while there are changes over time, there are also important continuities."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Crime and Punishment in Victorian London

Discover the seamy history of nineteenth-century England that has inspired countless crime novels and films.

Crime and Punishment in Victorian London

Author: Ross Gilfillan

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN: 1473834724

Page: 256

View: 963

Discover the seamy history of nineteenth-century England that has inspired countless crime novels and films. Victorian London: All over the city, watches, purses, and handkerchiefs disappear from pockets; goods migrate from warehouses, off docks, and out of shop windows. Burglaries are rife, shoplifting is carried on in West End stores, and people fall victim to all kinds of ingenious swindles. Pornographers proliferate and an estimated eighty thousand prostitutes operate on the city’s streets. Even worse, the vulnerable are robbed in dark alleys or garroted, a new kind of mugging in which the victim is half-strangled from behind while being stripped of his possessions. This history takes you to nineteenth-century London’s grimy rookeries, home to thousands of the city’s poorest and most desperate residents. Explore the crime-ridden slums, flash houses, and gin palaces from a unique street-level view—and meet the people who inhabited them.

Unconscious Crime

Combining the colorful intrigue of courtroom drama and the keen insights of social history, Unconscious Crime depicts Victorian England's legal and medical cultures confronting a new understanding of human behavior, and provocatively ...

Unconscious Crime

Author: Joel Peter Eigen

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 080188148X

Page: 248

View: 908

Combining the colorful intrigue of courtroom drama and the keen insights of social history, Unconscious Crime depicts Victorian England's legal and medical cultures confronting a new understanding of human behavior, and provocatively suggests these trials represent the earliest incarnation of double consciousness and multiple personality disorder.

The Myth of Judicial Independence

Slack James, 'Enemies of the People' Daily Mail (London, 4 November 2015).
Smith John Cyril, 'The New Judges' Rules—A Lawyer's View' [1964] Criminal
Law Review 176. Smith Phillip, Policing Victorian London (Greenwood Press
1985).

The Myth of Judicial Independence

Author: Mike McConville

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 0198822103

Page: 336

View: 118

Through an examination of the history of the rules that regulate police interrogation (the Judges' Rules) in conjunction with plea bargaining and the Criminal Procedure Rules, this book explores the 'Westminster Model' under which three arms of the State (parliament, the executive, and the judiciary) operate independently of one another. It reveals how policy was framed in secret meetings with the executive which then actively misled parliament in contradiction to its ostensible formal relationship with the legislature. This analysis of Home Office archives shows how the worldwide significance of the Judges' Rules was secured not simply by the standing of the English judiciary and the political power of the empire but more significantly by the false representation that the Rules were the handiwork of judges rather than civil servants and politicians. The book critically examines the claim repeatedly advanced by judges that "judicial independence" is justified by principles arising from the "rule of law" and instead shows that the "rule of law" depends upon basic principles of the common law, including an adversarial process and trial by jury, and that the underpinnings of judicial action in criminal justice today may be ideological rather than based on principles.

Guilty Acts Guilty Minds C Stephen P Garvey

Consider three such defects popular in the criminal law: hypnosis,
somnambulism (sleepwalking), and multiple personality ... see Joel Peter Eigen,
Unconscious Crime: Mental Absence and Criminal Responsibility in Victorian
London (2003).

Guilty Acts  Guilty Minds   C Stephen P  Garvey

Author: Stephen P. Garvey

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 0190924322

Page:

View: 908

"You can't be convicted of a crime without a guilty act and a guilty mind." A lawyer might dress the same idea up in Latin: "You can't be convicted of a crime without actus reus and mens rea." Things like that are often said, but what do people mean when they say them? Guilty Acts, Guilty Minds proposes an understanding of mens rea and actus reus as limits on the authority of a state, and in particular the authority of a democratic state, to ascribe guilt through positive law to those accused of crime. Actus reus and mens rea are necessary conditions, among others, for the legitimacy, as distinct from the justice, of state punishment. The actus reus requirement disables a democratic state from using its authority, on the one hand, to ascribe guilt to those who didn't realize they were committing a crime, provided they lacked the capacity to realize they were committing a crime; and on the other, to ascribe guilt to those who realized they were committing a crime, but who lacked the capacity to conform their conduct to the requirements of law. The mens rea requirement disables a democratic state from using its authority, on the one hand, to ascribe guilt to those who didn't realize they were committing a crime, provided their ignorance manifested no lack of law-abiding concern for the law and its ends, and on the other, to ascribe guilt to those who realized they were committing a crime, but whose failure to conform to the law nonetheless manifested no lack of law-abiding concern for the law and its ends"--

Combating London s Criminal Class

This book explores whether this criminal class did indeed truly exist, and the effectivenessof measures brought against it.

Combating London   s Criminal Class

Author: Matthew Bach

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1350156221

Page: 208

View: 506

The criminal class was seen as a violent, immoral and dissolute sub-section of Victorian London's population. Making their living through crime and openly hostile to society, the lives of these criminals were characterised by drunkenness, theft and brutality. This book explores whether this criminal class did indeed truly exist, and the effectivenessof measures brought against it. Tracing the notion of the criminal class from as early as the 16th century, this book questions whether this sub-section of society did indeed exist. Bach discusses how unease of London's notorious rookeries, the frenzy of media attention and a [word deleted here] panic among the general public enforced and encouraged the fear of the 'criminal class' and perpetuated state efforts of social control. Using the Habitual Criminals Bills, this book explores how and why this legislation was introduced to deal with repeat offenders, and assesses how successful its repressive measures were. Demonstrating how the Metropolitan Police Force and London's Magistrates were not always willing tools of the British state, this book uses court records and private correspondence to reveal how inconsistent and unsuccessful many of these measures and punishments were, and calls into question the notion that the state gained control over recidivists in this period.

London s Shadows

This is a new and fresh portrait of London at the height of Victoria's reign, revealing the dark underbelly of the city's history.

London s Shadows

Author: Drew D. Gray

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 1847252427

Page: 280

View: 303

In 1888 London was the capital of the greatest empire the world had ever known. In the West End the glittering lamps illuminated the homes of the rich and the emporiums that displayed the countless luxuries that they enjoyed. This was a city that reflected the wealth of the Victorian age, but there was also a dark side to Victorian London: vice and crime, degradation, poverty and despair. When an unknown killer began murdering prostitutes in Whitechapel the horrors of the East End were brought out of the shadows. In 1888 London was the capital of the most powerful empire the world had ever known and the largest city in Europe. In the West End a new city was growing, populated by the middle classes, the epitome of 'Victorian values'. Across the city the situation was very different. The East End of London had long been considered a nether world, a dark and dangerous place, and it embodied many of the fears of respectable Victorians. Using the Whitechapel murders of Jack the Ripper as a focal point, London's Shadows explores prostitution and poverty, revolutionary politics and Irish terrorism, immigration, the criminal underclass and the developing role of the Metropolitan Police. It also considers how the sensationalist New Journalism took the news of the Ripper murders to the furthest corners of the Empire. This is a new and fresh portrait of London at the height of Victoria's reign, revealing the dark underbelly of the city's history.

Criminal Moves

Modes of Mobility in Crime Fiction Jesper Gulddal, Alistair Rolls, Stewart King ...
He has 'gravitated to London, that great cesspool into which all the loungers and
idlers of the Empire are irresistibly ... The irony in calling Sherlock Holmes
provincial is that his province, his region or specialty, is London as the Victorian
imperial ...

Criminal Moves

Author: Jesper Gulddal

Publisher:

ISBN: 1789620589

Page: 224

View: 978

Criminal Moves: Modes of Mobility in Crime Fiction offers a major intervention into contemporary theoretical debates about crime fiction. It seeks to overturn the following preconceptions: that the genre does not warrant critical analysis, that genre norms and conventions matter more than textual individuality, and that comparative perspectives are secondary to the study of the British-American canon. Criminal Moves challenges the distinction between literary and popular fiction and proposes that crime fiction be seen as constantly violating its own boundaries. Centred on three axes of mobility, the essays ask how can we imagine a mobile reading practice that realizes the genre's full textual complexity, without being limited by the authoritative self-interpretations provided by crime narratives; how we can overcome restrictive notions of 'genre', 'formula' or 'popular'; and how we can establish transnational perspectives that challenge the centrality of the British-American tradition and recognize that the global history of crime fiction is characterized, not by the existence of parallel national traditions, but rather by processes of appropriation and transculturation. Criminal Moves presents a comprehensive reinterpretation of the history of the genre that also has profound ramifications for how we read individual crime fiction texts.

Murder by the Book

Murder By the Book combines this thrilling true-crime story with an illuminating account of the rise of the novel form and the battle for its early soul among the most famous writers of the time.

Murder by the Book

Author: Claire Harman

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0525520406

Page: 272

View: 188

"Enthralling . . . A page-turner that can hold its own with any one of the many murder-minded podcasts out there." —Jezebel From the acclaimed biographer--the fascinating, little-known story of a Victorian-era murder that rocked literary London, leading Charles Dickens, William Thackeray, and Queen Victoria herself to wonder: Can a novel kill? In May 1840, Lord William Russell, well known in London's highest social circles, was found with his throat cut. The brutal murder had the whole city talking. The police suspected Russell's valet, Courvoisier, but the evidence was weak. The missing clue, it turned out, lay in the unlikeliest place: what Courvoisier had been reading. In the years just before the murder, new printing methods had made books cheap and abundant, the novel form was on the rise, and suddenly everyone was reading. The best-selling titles were the most sensational true-crime stories. Even Dickens and Thackeray, both at the beginning of their careers, fell under the spell of these tales--Dickens publicly admiring them, Thackeray rejecting them. One such phenomenon was William Harrison Ainsworth's Jack Sheppard, the story of an unrepentant criminal who escaped the gallows time and again. When Lord William's murderer finally confessed his guilt, he would cite this novel in his defense. Murder By the Book combines this thrilling true-crime story with an illuminating account of the rise of the novel form and the battle for its early soul among the most famous writers of the time. It is superbly researched, vividly written, and captivating from first to last.

Crime and Society in England 1750 1900

For crime in London see Jennifer Davis , ' Law breaking and law enforcement :
The creation of a criminal class in mid - Victorian London ' , Ph.D , Boston
College , 1984 ; while for valuable insights into the ' criminal class ' , how it was ...

Crime and Society in England  1750 1900

Author: Clive Emsley

Publisher: Longman Publishing Group

ISBN:

Page: 257

View: 517

Crime and Criminals in Victorian Essex

Much was made of the great luck which caused the engine to head away from
London – had it gone the other way disaster might have occurred . Thorogood
was given six months in prison and a £5 fine . When railway officials seemed to
be ...

Crime and Criminals in Victorian Essex

Author: Adrian Gray

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page: 128

View: 523

Policing Victorian London

Political Policing, Public Order, and the London Metropolitan Police Phillip
Thurmond Smith ... Nevertheless , scholars writing in the past fifteen years or so
have noted the appearance of a decline in crimes of violence and a leveling off ...

Policing Victorian London

Author: Phillip Thurmond Smith

Publisher: Praeger

ISBN:

Page: 229

View: 207

Sadie Always Believed in God's Promises. But Can She Really Trust His Heart? Young Amish widow, Sadie Fisher, leads a simple life in the quiet countryside of Lancaster County selling Amish goods to a steady stream of tourists. Though it is a good life, lately she's wondered if it is God's will for her to remain without a husband and a family. Winters can be brutally cold and lonely in Pennsylvania, so Sadie rejoices when a renter signs up for a three month stay in her guest cottage. But when wealthy, impulsive "Englischer "Kade Saunders arrives, she isn't sure she wants him around that long. Sadie feels the stress of the bishop's watchful eye, expecting her to act in accordance with the ""Ordnung"," the understood behavior by which the Amish live. To complicate things, Kade is soon surprised with sole custody of a child he barely knows his five-year-old autistic son, Tyler. Sadie and young Tyler form an immediate connection. As she grows to love and understand this exceptional child, her feelings for Kade grow into something that both terrifies and exhilarates her. And while Kade seems to feel the attraction to her as well, their worlds couldn't be farther apart. Sadie must stay true to her Amish roots, but denying the love she feels is impossible. Could it be that God has the improbable in store for Sadie? And will she have the faith to step into a love bigger than she's ever dreamed possible?

Burglars and Bobbies

This book examines the reality of crime levels within the Metropolis, the extent to which they differed from public perception, and the manner in which they changed over time.

Burglars and Bobbies

Author: Gregory J. Durston

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN: 144384344X

Page: 305

View: 754

The early decades of the nineteenth century witnessed an apparent deterioration in public order and security in the London area. This continued to worsen until the middle of the century. During this period, the Metropolitan Police was established, ostensibly transforming policing in the capital. By the 1860s, crime seemed to be falling rapidly and continued to do so until the end of the century, so that it was no longer normally a subject that occasioned acute political concern. This book examines the reality of crime levels within the Metropolis, the extent to which they differed from public perception, and the manner in which they changed over time. It considers how the police might have had an impact on public security after 1829, the use of the ‘broken windows’ paradigm for crime control in an historical context, and the extent to which the police can take credit for the post-1860 improvement in offending levels and order. However, it also discusses other factors, both economic and social, that might explain these developments. At the same time, the book charts the general history and development of urban policing in London during the nineteenth century, the complicated and sometimes competing mixture of political and financial concerns, operational priorities, public and ‘expert’ opinion that it reflected, and the controversies that it engendered. In particular, it discusses the ‘traditional’ form of policing that was replaced in 1829, and why this occurred; the importance of foot patrol to the new force, with its strengths and weaknesses; the re-emergence of detective policing; and the legal powers and judicial support available to officers in the capital. Very importantly, this study also considers the problems thrown up by the new style of policing, its potential for abuse, and the public resistance that this sometimes encouraged.

Victorian London

Admittedly , the latter often had a serious message about reforming society ,
interweaving accounts of crime and criminals with social commentary . The best
example of this type is James Greenwood ' s vivid Seven Curses of London (
1869 ) ...

Victorian London

Author: Lee Jackson

Publisher: New Holland Publishers Uk Limited

ISBN:

Page: 160

View: 751

When Queen Victoria was in power, it was a period of massive development in London. Much of contemporary London owes a great deal to its Victorian heritage and influence. From the cultural highs of museums and theaters to the perennially popular pubs and markets, the influence of the Victorians is evident in many commonplace London scenes. Victorian London is a guide to the London of this period, and the glorious evidence that remains in London's landscape and today's society. Author Lee Jackson is an entertaining guide who relates his detailed knowledge of many aspects of the social history of the period: architecture, popular culture, education, crime and punishment, food and drink, shopping and transport. Superb photographs illustrate this celebration of Victorian history and architecture. This book is ideal for residents and visitors alike.

Criminal Lives

Davis , J. ( 1980 ) ' The London Garrotting Panic of 1862 : A Moral Panic and the
Creation of a Criminal Class in mid - Victorian England ' , in Gatrell , V. A. C. , et al
( eds . ) Crime and the Law : A Social History of Crime in Western Europe since ...

Criminal Lives

Author: Barry S. Godfrey

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN:

Page: 213

View: 402

This book examines the histories of crime, and uses historical data to analyse modern criminological debates. Drawing on criminology, history, and social policy this book addresses a number of important issues about offenders' persistence in crime, and questions the current theoretical framework used to explain offending patterns.

Crime Control and Everyday Life in the Victorian City

This new study shows how the history of British crime, policing, and criminal justice was shaped in cities like Leeds, Liverpool, and Manchester, detailing how Victorian police forces were organized, how they sought to deal with crime and ...

Crime Control and Everyday Life in the Victorian City

Author: David Churchill

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0198797842

Page: 304

View: 815

The history of modern crime control is usually presented as a narrative of how the state wrested control over the governance of crime from the civilian public. Most accounts trace the decline of a participatory, discretionary culture of crime control in the early modern era, and its replacement by a centralized, bureaucratic system of responding to offending. The formation of the 'new' professional police forces in the nineteenth century is central to this narrative: henceforth, it is claimed, the priorities of criminal justice were to be set by the state, as ordinary people lost what authority they had once exercised over dealing with offenders. This book challenges this established view, and presents a fundamental reinterpretation of changes to crime control in the age of the new police. It breaks new ground by providing a highly detailed, empirical analysis of everyday crime control in Victorian provincial cities - revealing the tremendous activity which ordinary people displayed in responding to crime - alongside a rich survey of police organization and policing in practice. With unique conceptual clarity, it seeks to reorient modern criminal justice history away from its established preoccupation with state systems of policing and punishment, and move towards a more nuanced analysis of the governance of crime. More widely, the book provides a unique and valuable vantage point from which to rethink the role of civil society and the state in modern governance, the nature of agency and authority in Victorian England, and the historical antecedents of pluralized modes of crime control which characterize contemporary society.

Cahiers Victoriens douardiens

See Jennifer Davis , “ Law Breaking and Law Enforcement : the making of a
Criminal Class in Mid - Victorian London ” , Ph ... See also “ The London
Garrotting Panic of 1862 ” , and “ From ' Rookeries ' to ' Communities ” , as well as
Jennifer ...

Cahiers Victoriens     douardiens

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page:

View: 108