Fighting France

Nor have the French ever enjoyed the savage forms of sport which stimulate the
blood of more apathetic or more brutal races. Neither prize-fighting nor bull-
fighting is of the soil in France, and Frenchmen do not settle their private
differences ...

Fighting France

Author: Edith Wharton

Publisher: BoD – Books on Demand

ISBN: 3732652157

Page: 80

View: 300

Reproduction of the original: Fighting France by Edith Wharton

Fighting France from Dunkerque to Belfort

Nor have the French ever enjoyed the savage forms of sport which stimulate the
blood of more apathetic or more brutal races. Neither prize-fighting nor
bullfighting is of the soil in France, and Frenchmen do not settle their private
differences ...

Fighting France  from Dunkerque to Belfort

Author: Edith Wharton

Publisher: Good Press

ISBN:

Page: 172

View: 612

"Fighting France, from Dunkerque to Belfort" by Edith Wharton. Published by Good Press. Good Press publishes a wide range of titles that encompasses every genre. From well-known classics & literary fiction and non-fiction to forgotten−or yet undiscovered gems−of world literature, we issue the books that need to be read. Each Good Press edition has been meticulously edited and formatted to boost readability for all e-readers and devices. Our goal is to produce eBooks that are user-friendly and accessible to everyone in a high-quality digital format.

Fighting France From Dunkerque to Belport

Simply that, and no more; but she might have been speaking for all the mothers
of France. ... Every French soldier knows why he is fighting, and why, at this
moment, physical courage is the first quality demanded of him; every
Frenchwoman ...

Fighting France  From Dunkerque to Belport

Author: Edith Wharton

Publisher: Lulu Press, Inc

ISBN: 1291638660

Page:

View: 586

Originally published in 1915, Fighting France: From Dunkerque to Belport is a collection of Wharton's war journalism that initially appeared singularly in Scribners Magazine. A committed Francophile, Wharton had moved to France on the break-up of her marriage and when the war came she did what she could to support the country's struggles, predominantly through charity work for the Red Cross but also in writing. In these articles, Wharton, though writing at times in an overtly dramatic fashion – she was a novelist after all – doesn't blink from describing the hellish nature of the conflict and the consequent suffering of the French soldier. If she had a purpose other than offering her assistance through her charity work, it was to bring the war to the attentions of the American public.

Great Writers on The Great War Fighting France

All around was noonday quiet, and thesober disciplined landscape which the
traveller's memory is apt to evoke as distinctively French. Sometimes, evento
accustomed eyes, these ruled off fieldsand compact greyvillages seem merelyflat
and ...

Great Writers on The Great War Fighting France

Author: Edith Wharton

Publisher: Amberley Publishing Limited

ISBN: 1445642069

Page: 160

View: 284

A classic account of the outbreak of war and a nation under invasion

Fighting in France

In this book the author has striven to chronicle some of the valorous deeds and to
relate some of the incidents and events that are part of the everyday life of the
soldier who is fighting in France. It has been his aim to present the story devoid of
 ...

Fighting in France

Author: Ross Kay

Publisher: 1st World Publishing

ISBN: 1421849577

Page: 140

View: 277

Well, Leon, it looks as if there was going to be a fight around here pretty soon. "Right you are, Earl. That suits me all right though and from the way the rest of the men are acting it seems to suit them too." Earl and Leon Platt, two American boys in the army of the French Republic, were seated outside their quarters behind the fighting line. The scene was in Champagne, one of the provinces of France that already had witnessed some of the heaviest fighting of the Big War. At the outbreak of the great European struggle these twin brothers had been traveling in Europe. Earl was in England with friends and Leon was visiting his aunt and uncle in a suburb just outside of Paris. At the earliest possible moment Leon had enlisted in the French army. Assigned to the avi-ation corps he had taken part in the great retreat from Belg-ium to the gates of the French capital. Slightly wounded at Charleroi, he had been in one of the hospitals for a few days.

Fighting France

"Fighting France" by Stéphane Lauzanne (translated by John Lauris Blake Williams).

Fighting France

Author: Stéphane Lauzanne

Publisher: Good Press

ISBN:

Page: 188

View: 745

"Fighting France" by Stéphane Lauzanne (translated by John Lauris Blake Williams). Published by Good Press. Good Press publishes a wide range of titles that encompasses every genre. From well-known classics & literary fiction and non-fiction to forgotten−or yet undiscovered gems−of world literature, we issue the books that need to be read. Each Good Press edition has been meticulously edited and formatted to boost readability for all e-readers and devices. Our goal is to produce eBooks that are user-friendly and accessible to everyone in a high-quality digital format.

Fighting with French A Tale of the New Army

When the cliffs of France hove in sight he got up and leant over the rail, eagerly
watching the advancing coastline. "That's France, is it?" he remarked. "I don't see
much difference. I can't understand why the folks over there don't speak English,
 ...

Fighting with French   A Tale of the New Army

Author: Herbert Strang

Publisher: HODDER AND STOUGHTON

ISBN:

Page: 174

View: 354

Fighting with French : A Tale of the New Army At six o'clock next morning sergeant-majors and corporals went round the hall stirring up the sleepers. There were groans and grumbles, but the men turned out, and there was a general dash for the washing basins--one among twenty men--and a free fight for the razors. Our two friends had brought their own safeties and pocket mirrors, and when they had finished operating upon their downy cheeks there was a competition among their new messmates for the loan of those indispensable articles. "Your bristles will ruin a blade in no time, Ginger," said Harry, as he handed over the razor, somewhat ruefully. "Perseverance, that's all you want," replied Ginger, through the lather. "Yours 'll be as hard as mine in time." At half-past six each man seized a mug and rushed off to the cook-house across the yard for cocoa. They sat about the hall, swilling the morning beverage, grumbling at the blankets, asking one another who'd be a soldier; then they rubbed up their boots and made their beds, and were ready for the seven o'clock parade. Dressed only in their shirts and slacks they formed up in the drill-hall. There was a good deal of disorder, and the N.C.O.'s, in early-morning temper, roared above the din. It happened that Dick Kennedy was orderly officer for the week. When the men were at last ranged in ranks, dressed, and numbered by the sergeants, he posted himself in front and, with a nervous twitching of the lips, said gently— "Battalion, 'shun!" "Louder, louder!" whispered a fellow-officer who had come up behind him. "This isn't a mothers' meeting." The second lieutenant tried again. "Battalion, 'shun! Advance in fours from the right. Form fours!" Some of the men knew what to do, but many of the new recruits looked about them blankly. "You don't know the movements?" said the lieutenant. "Well, when I say 'form fours,' even numbers take one pace to the left with the left foot and one pace to the right with the right. Now, form fours!" The result was disorder--jostling in the ranks, cries of "Who're you a-shoving of!" "Sorry! My mistake!" said Kennedy, with a smile. "We'll try again. I should have said, 'one pace to the rear with the left foot.' Now then, form fours!" His cheerfulness won the men's sympathy, and the order being now correctly carried out, one or two of them cheered. "Silence in the ranks!" roared Kennedy. "Right! Quick march!" and the battalion marched off. The day's work began with a run for three-quarters of an hour, to the bank of a river some two miles away. A "run" so called, for it consisted of slow and quick march and doubling in turn. At eight o'clock they were back in the hall for breakfast: tea, bread and bacon, sausage or cheese. The provisions were good, the men had healthy appetites, and at 9.15, when the battalion orders of the day were read, they were contented and cheerful.

France Time Travel Guide

Fighting France, Edith Wharton Edith Wharton was born in New York City in 1862
into a wealthy and privileged family. She became not only a society leader on
matters of taste and decoration, writing on the subject as well as designing her ...

France   Time Travel Guide

Author:

Publisher: Perspectives Travel

ISBN: 1471670724

Page:

View: 265

Canada between Vichy and Free France 1940 1945

[He] is very difficult to handle and we must remember he has a large following in
Metropolitan France?: ... Thus far, he had been judging the leader of the Fighting
French on the basis of the often contradictory information at his disposal.

Canada between Vichy and Free France  1940 1945

Author: Oliver Courteaux

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 1442661275

Page: 280

View: 148

The relationship between Canada and France has always been complicated by the Canadian federal government’s relations with Quebec. In this first study of Franco-Canadian relations during the Second World War, Olivier Courteaux demonstrates how Canada’s wartime foreign policy was shaped by the country’s internal divides. As Courteaux shows, Quebec’s vocal nationalist minority came to openly support France’s fascist Vichy regime and resented Canada’s involvement in a ‘British’ war, while English Canada was largely sympathetic to de Gaulle’s Free French movement and accepted its duty to aid embattled Mother Britain. Meanwhile, on the world stage, Canada deftly juggled ties with both French factions to appease Great Britain and the United States before eventually giving full support to the Free French movement. Courteaux concludes this extensively detailed study by illustrating Canada’s vital role in helping France reassert its position on the global stage after 1944. Filled with international intrigue and larger-than-life characters, Canada between Vichy and Free France adds greatly to our comprehension of Canada’s foreign relations and political history.

The Fighting Cocks

AVESNES-LE—COMTE, France FOUQUEROLLES (Beauvais), France
FIENVILLERS (Amiens), France SQUADRON BASES BOUVINCOURT (Peronne)
, France 31 October 1918 BICKENDORF, Cologne, Germany 19 December 1918
 ...

The Fighting Cocks

Author: Jimmy Beedle

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN: 1848843852

Page: 352

View: 704

In April 1916, a group of early aviators gathered in the fields beneath the crags and ramparts of Stirling Castle to form what was to become one of the Royal Air Force’s most distinguished fighter squadrons. Few squadrons can match the history of 43 Squadron which has included being the first to undertake ground attack operations during the First World War, shooting down the first enemy aircraft over England in the Second World War, and achieving the remarkable double of shooting down 6 enemy aircraft in one day in both World Wars. Its distinctive emblem of the Fighting Cock embodies the spirit and resilience of a fighter squadron that has been in the vanguard of RAF operations for almost a century. Perhaps the Fighting Cocks’ finest period occurred during the Battle of Britain when its Hurricanes destroyed 60 enemy aircraft with a further thirteen ”probables” and twenty-five more damaged. With the advent of the jet age, 43 Squadron became the first unit to fly the Hunter, seeing operational duties in Aden, before re-equipping with the Phantom until the end of the Cold War. This new edition of the Fighting Cocks’ history brings the story up to date and covers its 20 years of service with the Tornado F3, including the Gulf War, NATO operations over Bosnia, and the Iraq War. * This new edition of the Fighting Cocks’ history brings the story up to date * Few squadrons can match the history of 43 Squadron * Fighting Cock embodies the spirit and resilience of a fighter squadron that has been in the vanguard of RAF operations for almost a century

Fighting in the Clouds for France

you know it must come : France knows thatFrance makes ready . We shall not ...
They thought they had crushed us forever in 1870 — but France was too great for
them to crush ! They made us ... We do not want to fight , but we are not afraid .

Fighting in the Clouds for France

Author: James Fiske

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page: 255

View: 767

Describes European air battles during World War I.

The Fall of France

The high casualties on the French side also disprove any allegations that the
French did not fight tenaciously in 1940. No systematic official investigation of the
number of French soldiers killed in the Battle of France was undertaken after the
 ...

The Fall of France

Author: Julian Jackson

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 019162232X

Page: 296

View: 725

On 16 May 1940 an emergency meeting of the French High Command was called at the Quai d'Orsay in Paris. The German army had broken through the French lines on the River Meuse at Sedan and elsewhere, only five days after launching their attack. Churchill, who had been telephoned by Prime Minister Reynaud the previous evening to be told that the French were beaten, rushed to Paris to meet the French leaders. The mood in the meeting was one of panic and despair; there was talk of evacuating Paris. Churchill asked Gamelin, the French Commander in Chief, 'Where is the strategic reserve?' 'There is none,' replied Gamelin. This exciting book by Julian Jackson, a leading historian of twentieth-century France, charts the breathtakingly rapid events that led to the defeat and surrender of one of the greatest bastions of the Western Allies, and thus to a dramatic new phase of the Second World War. The search for scapegoats for the most humiliating military disaster in French history began almost at once: were miscalculations by military leaders to blame, or was this an indictment of an entire nation? Using eyewitness accounts, memoirs, and diaries, Julian Jackson recreates, in gripping detail, the intense atmosphere and dramatic events of these six weeks in 1940, unravelling the historical evidence to produce a fresh answer to the perennial question of whether the fall of France was inevitable.

Free France

Fighting France and Youth Problems ( F.F. ) Mr. R. A. Butler , President of the
Board of Education in London , called together on January 19 , 1943 the
Ministers of Education of the occupied countries . Fighting France was
represented by ...

Free France

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page:

View: 115

England s Last War Against France

Renowned for his chivalry towards prisoners, in France he is perhaps best
remembered for the reply he gave a captive officer who admonished him for
fighting for money rather than, as the British did, for honour. 'Each of us fights,'
admitted ...

England s Last War Against France

Author: Colin Smith

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 0297857819

Page: 352

View: 627

Genuinely new story of the Second World War - the full account of England's last war against France in 1940-42. Most people think that England's last war with France involved point-blank broadsides from sailing ships and breastplated Napoleonic cavalry charging red-coated British infantry. But there was a much more recent conflict than this. Under the terms of its armistice with Nazi Germany, the unoccupied part of France and its substantial colonies were ruled from the spa town of Vichy by the government of Marshal Philip Petain. Between July 1940 and November 1942, while Britain was at war with Germany, Italy and ultimately Japan, it also fought land, sea and air battles with the considerable forces at the disposal of Petain's Vichy French. When the Royal Navy sank the French Fleet at Mers El-Kebir almost 1,300 French sailors died in what was the twentieth century's most one-sided sea battle. British casualties were nil. It is a wound that has still not healed, for undoubtedly these events are better remembered in France than in Britain. An embarrassment at the time, France's maritime massacre and the bitter, hard-fought campaigns that followed rarely make more than footnotes in accounts of Allied operations against Axis forces. Until now.

The French Revolutionary Wars

At the end of a decade of continuous fighting, the French Revolutionary Wars left
France in a far stronger position than she had begun them, controlling not only
the so-called 'natural' frontiers of the Rhine, the Alps, and the Pyrenees, but ...

The French Revolutionary Wars

Author: Gregory Fremont-Barnes

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135977410

Page: 96

View: 321

Europe's great powers formed two powerful coalitions against France, yet force of numbers, superior leadership and the patriotic fervor of France's citizen-soldiers not only defeated each in turn, but closed the era of small, professional armies fighting for limited political objectives. This period produced commanders such as Napoleon and Nelson, whose names remain a by-word for excellence to this day. From Italy to Egypt Napoleon demonstrated his strategic genius and mastery of tactics in battles including Rivoli, the Pyramids and Marengo. Nelson's spectacular sea victories at the Nile and Copenhagen were foretastes of a century of British naval supremacy.

Fighting France

This is a pre-1923 historical reproduction that was curated for quality. Quality assurance was conducted on each of these books in an attempt to remove books with imperfections introduced by the digitization process.

Fighting France

Author: John Lauris Bla Joseph Vincent Lauzanne

Publisher: BiblioBazaar, LLC

ISBN: 9781113087584

Page: 250

View: 308

This is a pre-1923 historical reproduction that was curated for quality. Quality assurance was conducted on each of these books in an attempt to remove books with imperfections introduced by the digitization process. Though we have made best efforts - the books may have occasional errors that do not impede the reading experience. We believe this work is culturally important and have elected to bring the book back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide.