Food and War in Twentieth Century Europe

Wars cannot be fought and sustained without food and this unique collection explores the impact of war on food production, allocation and consumption in Europe in the twentieth century.

Food and War in Twentieth Century Europe

Author: Rachel Duffett

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317134419

Page: 294

View: 394

Wars cannot be fought and sustained without food and this unique collection explores the impact of war on food production, allocation and consumption in Europe in the twentieth century. A comparative perspective which incorporates belligerent, occupied and neutral countries provides new insights into the relationship between food and war. The analysis ranges from military provisioning and systems of food rationing to civilians' survival strategies and the role of war in stimulating innovation and modernization.

Food and War in Mid Twentieth Century East Asia

Food. and. War. in. East. Asia. Although historians have so far failed to producea
definition of'total war'that commands a general consensus,its main characteristics
have been identified.12 Three of the outlined features clearly indicate how ...

Food and War in Mid Twentieth Century East Asia

Author: Professor Katarzyna J Cwiertka

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN: 1409474488

Page: 210

View: 345

War has been both an agent of destruction and a catalyst for innovation. These two, at first sight contradictory, yet mutually constitutive outcomes of war-waging are particularly pronounced in twentieth-century Asia. While 1945 marked the beginning of peaceful recovery for Europe, military conflicts continued to play a critical role in the historical development of this part of the world. In essence, all wars in twentieth-century Asia stemmed from the political vacuum that developed after the fall of the Japanese Wartime Empire, intricately connecting one region with another. Yet, they have had often very diverse consequences, shattering the homes of some and bringing about affluence to others. Disarray of war may halt economic activities and render many aspects of life insignificant. The need for food, however, cannot be ignored and the social action that it requires continues in all circumstances. This book documents the effects of war on the lives of ordinary people through the investigation of a variety of connections that developed between war-waging and the production, distribution, preparation and consumption of food throughout Asia since the 1930s. The topics addressed range from issues at stake at the time of the conflicts, such as provisioning the troops and food rationing and food relief for civilians, to long-term, often surprising consequences of war waging and wartime mobilization of resources on the food systems, diets, and tastes of the societies involved. The main argument of this volume is that war has not been a mere disruption, but rather a central force in the social and cultural trajectories of twentieth-century Asia. Due to its close connection with human nourishment and comfort, food stands central in the life of the individual. On the other hand, owing to its connection with profit and power, food plays a critical role in the social and economic organization of a society. What happens to food and eating is, therefore, an important index of change, a privileged basis for the exploration of historical processes.

Hunger and War

The book makes a significant contribution to scholarship on the Soviet population's experience of World War II as well as to studies of war and famine.

Hunger and War

Author: Wendy Z. Goldman

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN: 0253017165

Page: 392

View: 765

Drawing on recently released Soviet archival materials, Hunger and War investigates state food supply policy and its impact on Soviet society during World War II. It explores the role of the state in provisioning the urban population, particularly workers, with food; feeding the Red army; the medicalization of hunger; hunger in blockaded Leningrad; and civilian mortality from hunger and malnutrition in other home front industrial regions. New research reported here challenges and complicates many of the narratives and counter-narratives about the war. The authors engage such difficult subjects as starvation mortality, bitterness over privation and inequalities in provisioning, and conflicts among state organizations. At the same time, they recognize the considerable role played by the Soviet state in organizing supplies of food to adequately support the military effort and defense production and in developing policies that promoted social stability amid upheaval. The book makes a significant contribution to scholarship on the Soviet population's experience of World War II as well as to studies of war and famine.

Eating for Victory

Amy Bentley reveals the role of the Wartime Homemaker as a pivotal component not only of World War II but also of the development of the United States into a superpower.

Eating for Victory

Author: Amy Bentley

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 9780252067273

Page: 238

View: 842

Mandatory food rationing during World War II significantly challenged the image of the United States as a land of plenty and collapsed the boundaries between women's public and private lives by declaring home production and consumption to be political activities. Examining the food-related propaganda surrounding rationing, Eating for Victory decodes the dual message purveyed by the government and the media: while mandatory rationing was necessary to provide food for U.S. and Allied troops overseas, women on the home front were also "required" to provide their families with nutritious food. Amy Bentley reveals the role of the Wartime Homemaker as a pivotal component not only of World War II but also of the development of the United States into a superpower.

Taste of War

This book traces the establishment of a global pattern of food production and distribution and shows how the war subsequently promoted the pervasive influence of American food habits and tastes in the post-war world.

Taste of War

Author: Lizzie Collingham

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 1101561319

Page: 656

View: 639

A New York Times Notable Book of 2012 Food, and in particular the lack of it, was central to the experience of World War II. In this richly detailed and engaging history, Lizzie Collingham establishes how control of food and its production is crucial to total war. How were the imperial ambitions of Germany and Japan - ambitions which sowed the seeds of war - informed by a desire for self-sufficiency in food production? How was the outcome of the war affected by the decisions that the Allies and the Axis took over how to feed their troops? And how did the distinctive ideologies of the different combatant countries determine their attitudes towards those they had to feed? Tracing the interaction between food and strategy, on both the military and home fronts, this gripping, original account demonstrates how the issue of access to food was a driving force within Nazi policy and contributed to the decision to murder hundreds of thousands of 'useless eaters' in Europe. Focusing on both the winners and losers in the battle for food, The Taste of War brings to light the striking fact that war-related hunger and famine was not only caused by Nazi Germany and Imperial Japan, but was also the result of Allied mismanagement and neglect, particularly in India, Africa and China. American dominance both during and after the war was not only a result of the United States' immense industrial production but also of its abundance of food. This book traces the establishment of a global pattern of food production and distribution and shows how the war subsequently promoted the pervasive influence of American food habits and tastes in the post-war world. A work of great scope, The Taste of War connects the broad sweep of history to its intimate impact upon the lives of individuals.

Food Will Win the War

This engaging case study of food, conservation, and life during World War I brings alive the unparalleled, mostly voluntary efforts made by everyday Minnesotans to help win the war.

Food Will Win the War

Author: Rae Katherine Eighmey

Publisher: Minnesota Historical Society

ISBN: 9780873517188

Page: 260

View: 896

This engaging case study of food, conservation, and life during World War I brings alive the unparalleled, mostly voluntary efforts made by everyday Minnesotans to help win the war.

War Agriculture and Food

The political emphasis on food and farming was made clear in a speech by the
legendary Prime Minister Per Albin Hansson as early as August 1939. Hansson's
first statement was that Sweden would stay neutral if a war broke out. The second
 ...

War  Agriculture  and Food

Author: Paul Brassley

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 0415522161

Page: 268

View: 830

Between the 1930s and the 1950s rural life in Europe underwent profound changes, partly as a result of the Second World War, and partly as a result of changes which had been in progress over many years. This book examines a range of European countries, from Scandinavia to Spain and Ireland to Hungary, during this crucial period, and identifies the common pressures to which they all responded and the features that were unique to individual countries. In particular, it examines the processes of agricultural development over western Europe as a whole, the impact of the war on international trading patterns, the relationships between states and farmers, and the changing identities of rural populations. It presents a bold attempt to write rural history on a European scale, and will be of interest not only to historians and historical geographers, but also to those interested in the historical background to the Common Agricultural Policy of the European Union, to which the changes discussed here provided a dramatic prologue.

Food Wars

This is an analysis of the impact of globalization on diet and health which shows how the global food economy contributes to ill health and greater inequality.

Food Wars

Author: Tim Lang

Publisher: Earthscan

ISBN: 1853837016

Page: 365

View: 690

It is widely accepted in the scientific community that climate change is a reality, and that changes are happening with increasing rapidity. In this second edition, leading climate researcher Barrie Pittock revisits the effects that global warming is havi

British Food Policy During the First World War RLE The First World War

Growing awarenessin the late summer of 1918 that an Allied victory was only
amatterof time made it necessary to decide what was to happen to the Ministry of
Food and the state trading system after the war. Given predictions of a contraction
 ...

British Food Policy During the First World War  RLE The First World War

Author: Margaret Barnett

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317704223

Page: 260

View: 378

Because of the exceptionally high proportion of imports in Britain’s food supply and the determined efforts of the enemy to sever the supply lines, efficient management of food resources was an essential element in the British national war effort. This volume was the first comprehensive study of this vital aspect of government strategy and fills a gap in the historiography of this period. This volume provides a balanced picture by drawing together the diverse elements that went into food policy: economic and social trends, international trade relations and labour issues. The author also traces the evolution of food policy during the pre-war planning period and the early part of the war, and analyses the roles of the United States and the labour organizations.

Food Will Win the War

... the popular slogan “Food Is a Weapon of War” was made tangible through the
wartime transformation ofa number of everyday acts of household food
preparation, production, and consumption into both material and symbolic
contributions to ...

Food Will Win the War

Author: Ian Mosby

Publisher: UBC Press

ISBN: 0774827637

Page: 284

View: 502

During the Second World War, as Canada struggled to provide its allies with food, public health officials warned that malnutrition could derail the war effort. Posters admonished Canadians to "Eat Right" because "Canada Needs You Strong" while cookbooks helped housewives become "housoldiers" through food rationing, menu substitutions, and household production. Ian Mosby explores the symbolic and material transformations that food and eating underwent as the Canadian state took unprecedented steps into the kitchens of the nation, changing the way women cooked, what their families ate, and how people thought about food. Canadians, in turn, rallied around food and nutrition to articulate new visions of citizenship for a new peacetime social order.

Communication and the First World War

their inclusion in the food economy as full-fledged contributors to the support of
the Allies: 'Every patriotic Canadian who desires to do his or her share toward
winning the war, can play a part by helping along the campaign to save food in ...

Communication and the First World War

Author: John Griffiths

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 0429798830

Page: 310

View: 467

Despite the voluminous historical literature on the First World War, a volume devoted to the theme of communication has yet to appear. From the communication of war aims and objectives to the communication of war call-up and war experience and knowledge, this volume fills the gap in the market, including the work of both established and newly emerging scholars working on the First World War across the globe. The volume includes chapters that focus on the experience of belligerent and also neutral powers, thus providing a genuinely representative dimension to the subject.

Food Power and Community

Women , food and and the war effort effort in Brisbane Kay Saunders At the third
and final demonstration of ' home cooking to a packed audience in the Brisbane
City Hall on 22 September 1939 , the ' world's highest paid cook ' , the Canadian
 ...

Food  Power and Community

Author: Robert Dare

Publisher: Wakefield Press

ISBN: 9781862545014

Page: 212

View: 375

Did Jesus cook? Why do Australians eat so much sugar and drink lots of cold beer? Do our foods have regional flavours? When and why did Australian diets start to show American influences? Did women in early modern England drink to much?

Food and the City in Europe since 1800

As he wrote on the eve of the First World War: The ideal of the people's nutrition
must be to offer each person sufficient food and to organize earning opportunities
so as to make it possible to keep the body normal and healthy. It is not my task ...

Food and the City in Europe since 1800

Author: Peter Lummel

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317134508

Page: 280

View: 322

This fascinating volume examines the impact that rapid urbanization has had upon diets and food systems throughout Western Europe over the past two centuries. Bringing together studies from across the continent, it stresses the fundamental links between key changes in European social history and food systems, food cultures and food politics. Contributors respond to a number of important questions, including: when and how did local food production cease to be sufficient for the city and when did improved transport conditions and liberal commercial relations replace local by supra-regional food supplies? How far did the food industry contribute to improved living conditions in cities? What influence did urban consumers have? Food and the City in Europe since 1800 also examines issues of food hygiene and health impacts in cities, looks at various food innovations and how ’new’ foods often first gained acceptance in cities, and explores how eating fashions have changed over the centuries.