Henry IV Part 1

This edition of "Henry IV, Part I", with Falstaff towering among his comic inventions, has an introduction discussing both the critical and theatrical history of the play.

Henry IV  Part 1

Author: William Shakespeare

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780192834218

Page: 315

View: 545

This edition of "Henry IV, Part I", with Falstaff towering among his comic inventions, has an introduction discussing both the critical and theatrical history of the play. It also analyzes its language in a commentary on individual words and phrases, and explains the historical background.

Henry IV

Shakespeare's play dealing with the beginning of Bolingbroke's rule as Henry IV and Prince Hals friendship with Falstaff.

Henry IV

Author: William Shakespeare

Publisher: Bantam Classics

ISBN: 0553212931

Page: 156

View: 567

Shakespeare's play dealing with the beginning of Bolingbroke's rule as Henry IV and Prince Hals friendship with Falstaff.

King Henry IV

If you have struggled in the past reading Shakespeare, then BookCaps can help you out. This book is a modern translation of Henry IV, Part II. The original text is also presented in the book, along with a comparable version of both text.

King Henry IV

Author: William Shakespeare

Publisher:

ISBN: 9781904271055

Page: 203

View: 714

King Richard II King Henry IV part 1

Myself I throw , dread sovereign , at thy foot : My life thou shalt command , but not
my shame : The one my duty owes ; but ... a degrading punishment inflicted on
recreant knights ; one part of which consisted in hanging them up by the heels .

King Richard II  King Henry IV  part 1

Author: William Shakespeare

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page: 38

View: 126

King John King Richard II King Henry IV part 1 King Henry IV part 2 Henry V King Henry VI part 1 King Henry VI part 2 King Henry VI part 3 King Richard III King Henry VIII Titus Andronicus Pericles Glossary

I'll make it greater ere I part from If I were much in love with vanity . thee ; Death
hath not struck so fat a dear to - day , And all the budding honors on thy crest
Though many dearer , in this bloody fray . I'll crop , to make a garland for my head
.

King John  King Richard II  King Henry IV  part 1  King Henry IV  part 2  Henry V  King Henry VI  part 1  King Henry VI  part 2  King Henry VI  part 3  King Richard III  King Henry VIII  Titus Andronicus  Pericles  Glossary

Author: William Shakespeare

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page: 26

View: 269

King John King Richard II King Henry IV Part 1

Mine honour is my life ; both grow in one ; Take honour from me , and my life is
done : Then , dear my liege , mine honour let me try ; In that I live , and for ...
Again , in K. Henry IV , Part I. A & I. sc . ü : an I do not , call me villain , and baffle
me .

King John  King Richard II  King Henry IV  Part 1

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page:

View: 543

King Henry IV

Henry IV, Part 1 is a history play by William Shakespeare, believed to have been written no later than 1597.

King Henry IV

Author: William Shakespeare

Publisher: CreateSpace

ISBN: 9781500654559

Page: 136

View: 362

Henry IV, Part 1 is a history play by William Shakespeare, believed to have been written no later than 1597. It is the second play in Shakespeare's tetralogy dealing with the successive reigns of Richard II, Henry IV (two plays), and Henry V. Henry IV, Part 1 depicts a span of history that begins with Hotspur's battle at Homildon against the Douglas late in 1402 and ends with the defeat of the rebels at Shrewsbury in the middle of 1403. From the start it has been an extremely popular play both with the public and the critics.Henry Bolingbroke—now King Henry IV—is having an unquiet reign. His personal disquiet at the murder of his predecessor Richard II would be solved by a crusade to the Holy Land, but broils on his borders with Scotland and Wales prevent that. Moreover, he is increasingly at odds with the Percy family, which helped him to his throne, and Edmund Mortimer, the Earl of March, Richard II's chosen heir.Adding to King Henry's troubles is the behaviour of his son and heir, the Prince of Wales. Hal (the future Henry V) has forsaken the Royal Court to waste his time in taverns with low companions. This makes him an object of scorn to the nobles and calls into question his royal worthiness. Hal's chief friend and foil in living the low life is Sir John Falstaff. Fat, old, drunk, and corrupt as he is, he has a charisma and a zest for life that captivates the Prince.The play features three groups of characters that interact slightly at first, and then come together in the Battle of Shrewsbury, where the success of the rebellion will be decided. First there is King Henry himself and his immediate council. He is the engine of the play, but usually in the background. Next there is the group of rebels, energetically embodied in Henry Percy ("Hotspur") and including his father, the Earl of Northumberland and led by his uncle Thomas Percy, Earl of Worcester. The Scottish Earl of Douglas, Edmund Mortimer and the Welshman Owen Glendower also join. Finally, at the center of the play are the young Prince Hal and his companions Falstaff, Poins, Bardolph, and Peto. Streetwise and pound-foolish, these rogues manage to paint over this grim history in the colours of comedy.As the play opens, the king is angry with Hotspur for refusing him most of the prisoners taken in a recent action against the Scots at Holmedon. Hotspur, for his part, would have the king ransom Edmund Mortimer (his wife's brother) from Owen Glendower, the Welshman who holds him. Henry refuses, berates Mortimer's loyalty, and treats the Percys with threats and rudeness. Stung and alarmed by Henry's dangerous and peremptory way with them, they proceed to make common cause with the Welsh and Scots, intending to depose "this ingrate and cankered Bolingbroke." By Act II, rebellion is brewing.Meanwhile, Henry's son Hal is joking, drinking, and whoring with Falstaff and his associates. He likes Falstaff but makes no pretense at being like him. He enjoys insulting his dissolute friend and makes sport of him by joining in Poins' plot to disguise themselves and rob and terrify Falstaff and three friends of loot they have stolen in a highway robbery, purely for the fun of watching Falstaff lie about it later, after which Hal returns the stolen money. Rather early in the play, in fact, Hal informs us that his riotous time will soon come to a close, and he will re-assume his rightful high place in affairs by showing himself worthy to his father and others through some (unspecified) noble exploits. Hal believes that this sudden change of manner will amount to a greater reward and acknowledgment of prince-ship, and in turn earn him respect from the members of the court.The revolt of Mortimer and the Percys very quickly gives him his chance to do just that. The high and the low come together when the Prince makes up with his father and is given a high command.

Henry IV Part One

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Of those whom I wish to thank for helping me with this
book , some work in theatres , some in libraries , some in both . Among the
theatre people , I am glad to thank Sir Peter Hall , Stephanie Howard , Ian Judge ,
Ed ...

Henry IV  Part One

Author: Scott McMillin

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 9780719027307

Page: 132

View: 216

This work is from a series on the performing and staging styles used in Shakespeare's plays. This text covers how the play has been presented by a number of theatres and theatre companies (eg, the Old Vic, the Shakespeare Memorial Theatre, the RSC), directors (eg, Peter Hall, Terry Hands, Orson Welles, Anthony Quayle, Cedric Messina, David Giles and Michael Bogdanov) and leading actors (eg, Olivier, Richardson, Burrell), from 1945 to 1986.