John Ray

Charles Raven's biography of the seventeenth-century English naturalist John Ray is one of the great works in the history of science.

John Ray

Author: Charles E. Raven

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521310833

Page: 506

View: 636

Charles Raven's biography of the seventeenth-century English naturalist John Ray is one of the great works in the history of science. The author's command of Latin (the language in which all Ray's biological works were written) and his enthusiasm for natural history enabled him to interpret superbly to the modern reader John Ray's remarkable scientific work and to rescue Ray's reputation from undeserved neglect. Raven reveals the unique influence Ray had on the development of modern science and in particular explains sympathetically the key role of Ray's last, most popular and most influential work, The Wisdom of God, which was the forerunner of the great 'Darwinian' controversies between science and religion in the nineteenth century.

John Ray s Cambridge Catalogue 1660

This book includes a complete translation from the Latin of the work together with the rare appendices to the Catalogue, published in 1663 and 1685, translated for the first time.

John Ray s Cambridge Catalogue  1660

Author: John Ray

Publisher:

ISBN: 9780903874434

Page: 612

View: 805

John Ray is considered the outstanding British natural historian of the 17th century. His first publication, A catalogue of plants growing around Cambridge (1660) is famous as the first British County Flora. It is a complex work, not only a botanical catalogue but also has “for the benefit of beginners” indexes of English names and of places (with lists of the rarer species of 12 areas in the county) together with chapters on the meanings of plant names and of botanical terms (hitherto untranslated). Ray’s abilities as an all-round naturalist are apparent from the numerous observations and digressions in the text. This book includes a complete translation from the Latin of the work together with the rare appendices to the Catalogue, published in 1663 and 1685, translated for the first time. The editorial commentary on the text is included in nearly 2000 footnotes which outline problems of translation, discuss the identity of some of Ray’s more problematic species, identify his cited and some of his uncited sources and detail the treatment in his later works of some of the plant variants (such as colour forms) that he regarded as species in 1660. The translation is preceded by introductory chapters which use unpublished manuscripts and recently published studies to present a new account of Ray’s time in the University of Cambridge and the possible roles of his collaborators. The work’s structure and sources are analysed, biographical portraits of the botanists cited by Ray provided together with a discussion of the problems of equating his names to modern taxa. The book ends with a vocabulary of the epithets in Ray’s Latin plant names, a gazetteer and a bibliography. As Professor Oliver Rackham comments in his foreword, other editions and commentaries on the ‘Cambridge Catalogue’ exist “but none does justice to its complexity, its discursiveness, its allusiveness, the circumstances of its writing, its vast bibliography or Ray’s other works associated with it as appendices or supplements”. Ewen and Lewis’ 1975 translation was limited to the text considered relevant to a ‘modern reader’ and excluded, for example, the chapters on technical terms and on etymology preventing a full assessment of Ray’s work. The authors both live in Cambridge and are Honorary Members of the Botanical Society of the British Isles and graduates of the University of Cambridge. Philip Oswald has a degree in Classics and Theology and Chris Preston a doctorate in Botany, thus combining John Ray’s principal interests.

John Ray 1627 1705 Essex Naturalist

The Growth of Biological Thought . MORTON , A . G . 1981 . History of Botanical
Science . MIAL , L . C . 1912 . The Early Naturalists . Their lives and Work .
OLIVER , F . W . 1913 . Makers of British Botany . PATTISSON , J . H . 1847 . John
Ray .

John Ray  1627 1705   Essex Naturalist

Author: Stuart A. Baldwin

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page: 80

View: 784

Memorials of John Ray

NOT E. [ The following notice of a recent visit to the tomb of John Ray , at Black
Notley , will not perhaps be without interest to the readers of this volume . “
PILGRIMAGE TO THE TOMB OF JOHN RAY , THE NATURALIST , AT BLACK
NOTLEY .

Memorials of John Ray

Author: William Derham

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page: 220

View: 206

English Naturalists

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online.

English Naturalists

Author: General Books LLC

Publisher: Books LLC, Wiki Series

ISBN: 9781157431251

Page: 400

View: 997

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 105. Chapters: Alfred Russel Wallace, Bill Oddie, Joseph Banks, John Ray, Henry Baker, Daines Barrington, Lucas Barrett, Henry Walter Bates, Charles Waterton, Gerald Durrell, Charles Darwin, Andrew Bloxam, Edward Blyth, James Eustace Bagnall, Kate Humble, James Sowerby, Miriam Rothschild, John Levett, Walter Rothschild, 2nd Baron Rothschild, Bernard d'Abrera, Simon King, Chris Packham, George Edward Lodge, William Martin, William Darwin Fox, Philip Pearsall Carpenter, Jonathan Couch, Thomas Muffet, Gilbert White, James Bolton, William Turner, Chris Baines, Tom Iredale, John Jenner Weir, Alfred Merle Norman, Joseph Burke II, Joseph Dandridge, Ernest William Lyons Holt, George Bennett, Mark Catesby, Richard Gordon Smith, George Crabbe, Samuel Stutchbury, Marianne North, Charles A. Foster, John Gilbert, Nick Baker, John Joseph Briggs, William Bullock, William John Burchell, Richard Taylor, Richard Quiller Couch, Martin Lister, Charles Hamilton Smith, Aubyn Trevor-Battye, Thomas Rossell Potter, Robert Plot, William Crawford Williamson, Mary Gillham, Antonio Brady, Charles Francis Massey Swynnerton, William Leigh Williamson Eyre, John Woodward, Terry Nutkins, Albany Hancock, John Josselyn, Edward Topsell, Edward Vernon Harcourt, Frederick William Frohawk, Albert Stewart Meek, Theodore Augustine Mann, William Gould, Fred J Speakman, Henry Edwin Barnes, John George Wood, Brett Westwood, Edward Jacob, Jeremy Mallinson, Jonathan Scott, Eleazar Albin, Thomas Brittain, Michael Tweedie, Horace William Wheelwright, Harry Godwin, Edward Adams, Thomas Garnett, Edward Doubleday, John Hancock, Fenwick Skrimshire, James Bulwer, Anna Blackburne, Matthew Barker, Charles William George St John, William Turton, Henry Doubleday, John Berkenhout, W. S. Bristowe, William Houghton, Norman Frederick Frome, James Yate Johnson, Anne Elizabeth Baker, William ...

English Naturalists from Neckam to Ray

Demonstrates how changing attitudes to the natural world influenced scientific thought between the medieval period and the eighteenth century.

English Naturalists from Neckam to Ray

Author: Charles E. Raven

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1108016340

Page: 394

View: 882

Demonstrates how changing attitudes to the natural world influenced scientific thought between the medieval period and the eighteenth century.

The English Parson naturalist

Since the time of William Turner (c 1508-1568) the figure of the parson-naturalist has been conspicuous int he English Church and in English science.

The English Parson naturalist

Author: Patrick Armstrong

Publisher: Gracewing Publishing

ISBN: 9780852445167

Page: 198

View: 974

Since the time of William Turner (c 1508-1568) the figure of the parson-naturalist has been conspicuous int he English Church and in English science. Clergy have made a formidable contribution to natural history in England. Gilbert White (1720-1793), the author of The Natural History of Selborne, is perhaps the best known of this distinguished company, but other notables include John Ray (1627-1705) with whom, it has been said, "the adventure of modern science begins." The brightness of the reputation of these individuals should not blind us to that great host of other luminaries who have made English natural history what it is today. There have been botanists and ornithologists, geologists and entomologists; clerical naturalists have included specialists on mollusks, sponges, fish, orchids, seaweeds and lichens.

Further Correspondence of John Ray

"This book ... is the outcome of a rediscovery in the Bodleian library of a number of letters of John Ray ... which form a necessary supplement to the volume of The correspondence," edited by Edwin Lankester, 1848.

Further Correspondence of John Ray

Author: John Ray

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page: 332

View: 376

"This book ... is the outcome of a rediscovery in the Bodleian library of a number of letters of John Ray ... which form a necessary supplement to the volume of The correspondence," edited by Edwin Lankester, 1848.

Essex Naturalist

When we come to history , the very first published record that I know of any
species of the Mycetozoa was made more than two hundred years ago by our
illustrious fellow - countryman , John Ray ( born 1627 ; died 1704 ) . We Essex
people ...

Essex Naturalist

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page:

View: 498

The Naming of the Shrew

75 S. A. Baldwin, John Ray, Essex Naturalist (Baldwin's Books, 1986). 76 C. E.
Raven, John Ray, Naturalist, His Life and Works (Cambridge University Press,
1942). 77 J. Ray, Historia Plantarum (Londini, 1686–1704). 78 Mayr, Biological ...

The Naming of the Shrew

Author: John Wright

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1408820358

Page: 303

View: 518

Latin names – frequently unpronounceable, all too often wrong and always a tiny puzzle to unravel – have been annoying the layman since they first became formalised as scientific terms in the eighteenth century. Why on earth has the entirely land-loving Eastern Mole been named Scalopus aquaticus, or the Oxford Ragwort been called Senecio squalidus – 'dirty old man'? What were naturalists thinking when they called a beetle Agra katewinsletae, a genus of fish Batman, and a Trilobite Han solo? Why is zoology replete with names such as Chloris chloris chloris (the greenfinch), and Gorilla gorilla gorilla (a species of, well gorilla)? The Naming of the Shrew will unveil these mysteries, exploring the history, celebrating their poetic nature and revealing how naturalists sometimes get things so terribly wrong. With wonderfully witty style and captivating narrative, this book will make you see Latin names in a whole new light.

John Aubrey

My friend Mr John Ray the naturalist writes to me from his home in Black Notley.
He tells me that Mr Evelyn countenances my observa. tion that elms grow no
further north than Stamford. My observation supports Mr. Evelyn's view that elms
 ...

John Aubrey

Author: Ruth Scurr

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 1448190878

Page: 544

View: 633

SHORTLISTED FOR THE 2015 COSTA BIOGRAPHY AWARD This is the autobiography that John Aubrey never wrote. You may not know his name. Aubrey was a modest man, a gentleman-scholar who cared far more for the preservation of history than for his own legacy. But he was a passionate collector, an early archaeologist and the inventor of modern biography. With all the wit, charm and originality that characterises her subject, Ruth Scurr has seamlessly stitched together John Aubrey’s own words to tell his life story and a captivating history of seventeenth-century England unlike any other. 'A game-changer in the world of biography' Mary Beard 'Ingenious' Hilary Mantel 'Irresistible' Philip Pullman

What Galileo Saw

Raven, Charles E. English Naturalists from Neckam to Ray: A Study of the
Making of the Modern World. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1947. —
—. John Ray, Naturalist: His Life and Works. Cambridge: Cambridge University
Press, ...

What Galileo Saw

Author: Lawrence Lipking

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 0801454840

Page: 336

View: 993

The Scientific Revolution of the seventeenth century has often been called a decisive turning point in human history. It represents, for good or ill, the birth of modern science and modern ways of viewing the world. In What Galileo Saw, Lawrence Lipking offers a new perspective on how to understand what happened then, arguing that artistic imagination and creativity as much as rational thought played a critical role in creating new visions of science and in shaping stories about eye-opening discoveries in cosmology, natural history, engineering, and the life sciences. When Galileo saw the face of the Moon and the moons of Jupiter, Lipking writes, he had to picture a cosmos that could account for them. Kepler thought his geometry could open a window into the mind of God. Francis Bacon's natural history envisioned an order of things that would replace the illusions of language with solid evidence and transform notions of life and death. Descartes designed a hypothetical "Book of Nature" to explain how everything in the universe was constructed. Thomas Browne reconceived the boundaries of truth and error. Robert Hooke, like Leonardo, was both researcher and artist; his schemes illuminate the microscopic and the macrocosmic. And when Isaac Newton imagined nature as a coherent and comprehensive mathematical system, he redefined the goals of science and the meaning of genius. What Galileo Saw bridges the divide between science and art; it brings together Galileo and Milton, Bacon and Shakespeare. Lipking enters the minds and the workshops where the Scientific Revolution was fashioned, drawing on art, literature, and the history of science to reimagine how perceptions about the world and human life could change so drastically, and change forever.

Exploring Environmental History Selected Essays

It was not in 1555, when the term 'natural history' entered the English language,
or in 1686 when John Ray published ... 2 Charles E. Raven, English Naturalists
from Neckam to Ray (Cambridge, 1947); Charles E. Raven, John Ray Naturalist.

Exploring Environmental History  Selected Essays

Author: T. C. Smout

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 0748635149

Page: 256

View: 206

This volume, newly available in paperback, brings together the best of T. C. Smout's recent articles and contributions to books and journals on the topic of environmental history and offers them as a collection of 'explorations'. The author's interests are multi-faceted and, though often focussed on post-1600 Scotland, by no means restricted to that area.

The Naturalist in Britain

1470-1670 (2nd edn, Cambridge, 1953) and Canon C. E. Raven's English
Naturalists from Ncfltam to Ray (Cambridge, 1947). Raven's greatest work, his
majestic biography of John Ray (2nd edn, Cambridge, 1950) — without any
doubt the ...

The Naturalist in Britain

Author: David Elliston Allen

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9780691036328

Page: 270

View: 699

At once a major resource for historians of science and an excellent introduction to natural history for the general reader, David Allen's The Naturalist in Britain established a precedent for investigating natural history as a social phenomenon. Here the author traces the evolution of natural history from the seventeenth to the early twentieth centuries, from the "herbalizings" of apprentice apothecaries to the establishment of national reserves and international societies to the emergence of natural history as an organized discipline. Along the way he describes the role of scientific ideas, popular fashion, religious motivations, literary influences, the increase of leisure time and disposable income, and the tendency of like-minded persons to form clubs. His comprehensive and entertaining discussion creates a vibrant portrait of a scientific movement inextricably woven into a particular culture.

The New Cambridge Bibliography of English Literature Volume 1 600 1660

Raven, C. E. John Ray naturalist. Cambridge 1942, 1950 (rev). —English
naturalists from Neckam to Ray. Cambridge I947. – Natural religion and Christian
theology. 2 vols Cambridge 1953. Lenoble, R. Mersenne ou la naissance du ...

The New Cambridge Bibliography of English Literature  Volume 1  600 1660

Author: George Watson

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521200042

Page: 1282

View: 566

More than fifty specialists have contributed to this new edition of volume 1 of The Cambridge Bibliography of English Literature. The design of the original work has established itself so firmly as a workable solution to the immense problems of analysis, articulation and coordination that it has been retained in all its essentials for the new edition. The task of the new contributors has been to revise and integrate the lists of 1940 and 1957, to add materials of the following decade, to correct and refine the bibliographical details already available, and to re-shape the whole according to a new series of conventions devised to give greater clarity and consistency to the entries.

The Growth of Biological Thought

Captain Cook had the Forsters, father and son, as naturalists on one of his
voyages. The younger ... As a local naturalist, like John Ray before him, he
observed the clear-cut discontinuity between species and assumed the
impossibility of one ...

The Growth of Biological Thought

Author: Ernst Mayr

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674364462

Page: 974

View: 718

An incisive study of the development of the biological sciences chronicles the origins, maturation, and modern views of the classification of life forms, the evolution of species, and the inheritance and variation of characteristics

The Essex Naturalist

IS lis THE ESSEX NATURALIST : BEING THE Journal of the Esser Field Club
FOR 1894 . ... John Ray , in his " Synopsis Methodica Stirpium Britannicarum , ”
1690 , mentions a few Essex Algæ , but it is not always easy to recognise from
Ray's ...

The Essex Naturalist

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page:

View: 560