Kinship in Ancient Athens

The work is arranged into two volumes, both utilizing the same anthropological approach to ancient sources.

Kinship in Ancient Athens

Author: S. C. Humphreys

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0191092401

Page: 1504

View: 306

The concept of kinship is at the heart of understanding not only the structure and development of a society, but also the day-to-day interactions of its citizens. Kinship in Ancient Athens aims to illuminate both of these issues by providing a comprehensive account of the structures and perceptions of kinship in Athenian society, covering the archaic and classical periods from Drakon and Solon up to Menander. Drawing on decades of research into a wide range of epigraphic, literary, and archaeological sources, and on S. C. Humphreys' expertise in the intersections between ancient history and anthropology, it not only puts a wealth of data at readers' fingertips, but subjects it to rigorous analysis. By utilizing an anthropological approach to reconstruct patterns of behaviour it is able to offer us an ethnographic 'thick description' of ancient Athenians' interaction with their kin that offers insights into a range of social contexts, from family life, rituals, and economic interactions, to legal matters, politics, warfare, and more. The work is arranged into two volumes, both utilizing the same anthropological approach to ancient sources. Volume I explores interactions and conflicts shaped by legal and economic constraints (adoption, guardianship, marriage, inheritance, property), as well as more optional relationships in the field of ritual (naming, rites de passage, funerals and commemoration, dedications, cultic associations) and political relationships, both formal (Assembly, Council) and informal (hetaireiai). Among several important and novel topics discussed are the sociological analysis of names and nicknames, the features of kin structure that advantaged or disadvantaged women in legal disputes, and the economic relations of dependence and independence between fathers and sons. Volume II deals with corporate groups recruited by patrifiliation and explores the role of kinship in these subdivisions of the citizen body: tribes and trittyes (both pre-Kleisthenic and Kleisthenic), phratries, genê, and demes. The section on the demes stresses variety rather than common features, and provides comprehensive information on location and prosopography in a tribally organized catalogue.

Kinship Myth in Ancient Greece

In this detailed study, Lee E. Patterson elevates the current state of research on kinship myth to a consideration of the role it plays in the construction of political and cultural identity.

Kinship Myth in Ancient Greece

Author: Lee E. Patterson

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 0292739591

Page: 271

View: 905

In ancient Greece, interstate relations, such as in the formation of alliances, calls for assistance, exchanges of citizenship, and territorial conquest, were often grounded in mythical kinship. In these cases, the common ancestor was most often a legendary figure from whom both communities claimed descent. In this detailed study, Lee E. Patterson elevates the current state of research on kinship myth to a consideration of the role it plays in the construction of political and cultural identity. He draws examples both from the literary and epigraphical records and shows the fundamental difference between the two. He also expands his study into the question of Greek credulity—how much of these founding myths did they actually believe, and how much was just a useful fiction for diplomatic relations? Of central importance is the authority the Greeks gave to myth, whether to elaborate narratives or to a simple acknowledgment of an ancestor. Most Greeks could readily accept ties of interstate kinship even when local origin narratives could not be reconciled smoothly or when myths used to explain the link between communities were only "discovered" upon the actual occasion of diplomacy, because such claims had been given authority in the collective memory of the Greeks.

Encyclopedia of Ancient Greece

Papazoglou , Fanoula , Les Villes de Macédoine à l'époque Romaine , Athens :
Ecole Française d'Athènes , 1988 . ... The oeuvre of Greek dramatists amply
demonstrates the crucial part played by kinship and family in ancient times .

Encyclopedia of Ancient Greece

Author: Nigel Guy Wilson

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 9780415973342

Page: 800

View: 573

Ancient Greek civilization, with its mythology, wars, philosophy and culture, has left an enduring legacy. This single volume, a spin-off from the acclaimed Encyclopedia of Greece and the Hellenic Tradition, provides a comprehensive and authoritative guide to the people, places, periods, events and themes of Ancient Greece.

Anthropology and the Greeks

The first section of the book deals with the history of the relationship of classical studies and anthropology.

Anthropology and the Greeks

Author: S.C. Humphreys

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136549773

Page: 376

View: 490

The first section of the book deals with the history of the relationship of classical studies and anthropology. In the second section the more material aspects of ancient Greek life are considered and the author relates the economic history of the period to new approaches in archaeology and economic anthropology. The place of kinship in the social structure of the Greek city-state; the social factors involved in the genesis of Greek philosophy; and the structural and institutional components of 'freedom' in classical Athens are all examined. First published in 1978.

Kinship and Politics in Athens 600 400 B C

In ancient Athens kinship and politics were inseparable. This book studies that relationship through the methods of anthropology.

Kinship and Politics in Athens  600 400 B C

Author: Robert J. Littman

Publisher: Peter Lang Pub Incorporated

ISBN:

Page: 274

View: 655

In ancient Athens kinship and politics were inseparable. This book studies that relationship through the methods of anthropology. The political, social and religious systems of sixth and fifth century B.C. Athens are shown as functions of a patrilineal kinship system. In the earlier period the patrilineal kinship descent groups were the political system. As the city developed, the descent groups no longer defined the state, but their vitality persisted as politicians recruited their party members and allies from their own and allied kinship groups.

Lending and Borrowing in Ancient Athens

In archaic and classical Athens , kinship connexions have conventionally been
seen as extending beyond the nuclear family ( oikia ) to include other descent
groups , notably the genos . Usually ( and probably misleadingly ) translated as ...

Lending and Borrowing in Ancient Athens

Author: Paul Millett

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521893916

Page: 384

View: 480

This is a book about the social and economic history of ancient Greece and has as its core a detailed study of credit relations in Athens during the fourth century BC. It looks at ancient economy and society in their own terms and demonstrates that the very different system of credit in Athens had its own complexity and sophistication.

A Companion to Families in the Greek and Roman Worlds

A Companion to Families in the Greek and Roman Worlds draws from both established and current scholarship to offer a broad overview of the field, engage in contemporary debates, and pose stimulating questions about future development in the ...

A Companion to Families in the Greek and Roman Worlds

Author: Beryl Rawson

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781444390759

Page: 664

View: 131

A Companion to Families in the Greek and Roman Worlds draws from both established and current scholarship to offer a broad overview of the field, engage in contemporary debates, and pose stimulating questions about future development in the study of families. Provides up-to-date research on family structure from archaeology, art, social, cultural, and economic history Includes contributions from established and rising international scholars Features illustrations of families, children, slaves, and ritual life, along with maps and diagrams of sites and dwellings Honorable Mention for 2011 Single Volume Reference/Humanities & Social Sciences PROSE award granted by the Association of American Publishers

Pity and Power in Ancient Athens

... ( 127–29 ) ; since the chorus consists ofold Athenian men , they recognize
more readily their own similarity to lolaus . ... ( on kinship as a basis for alliance ,
see Jones 1999 ) and Athens'debt to Heracles for having rescued Theseus from
Hades ...

Pity and Power in Ancient Athens

Author: Rachel Hall Sternberg

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521845526

Page: 356

View: 849

Ancient Athenians resemble modern Americans in their moral discomfort with empire. Athenians had power and used it ruthlessly, but the infliction of suffering did not mesh well with their civic-self-image. Embracing the concepts of democracy and freedom, they proudly pitted themselves against tyranny and oppression, but in practice they were capable of being tyrannical. Pity and Power in Ancient Athens argues that the exercise of power in democratic Athens, especially during its brief fifth-century empire, raised troubling questions about the alleviation and infliction of suffering, and pity emerged as a topic in Atheninan culture at this time.

The Birth of the Athenian Community

Undermining the current dominant approach, which seeks to explain ancient Athens in modern terms, dividing all Athenians into citizens and non-citizens, this book rationalizes the development of Athens, and other Greek poleis, as a ...

The Birth of the Athenian Community

Author: Sviatoslav Dmitriev

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351621440

Page: 392

View: 596

The Birth of the Athenian Community elucidates the social and political development of Athens in the sixth century, when, as a result of reforms by Solon and Cleisthenes (at the beginning and end of the sixth century, respectively), Athens turned into the most advanced and famous city, or polis, of the entire ancient Greek civilization. Undermining the current dominant approach, which seeks to explain ancient Athens in modern terms, dividing all Athenians into citizens and non-citizens, this book rationalizes the development of Athens, and other Greek poleis, as a gradually rising complexity, rather than a linear progression. The multidimensional social fabric of Athens was comprised of three major groups: the kinship community of the astoi, whose privileged status was due to their origins; the legal community of the politai, who enjoyed legal and social equality in the polis; and the political community of the demotai, or adult males with political rights. These communities only partially overlapped. Their evolving relationship determined the course of Athenian history, including Cleisthenes’ establishment of demokratia, which was originally, and for a long time, a kinship democracy, since it only belonged to qualified male astoi.

City state Civism in Ancient Athens

Paul Woodruff The origins of western civism began in ancient Greece prior to the
formation I of the polis , when citizenship qualifications were determined by basic
tribal or kinship relationships . “ It ( kinship ) was reinforced both by the tribal ...

City state Civism in Ancient Athens

Author: Thomas L. Dynneson

Publisher: Peter Lang

ISBN: 9781433103117

Page: 222

View: 447

This book focuses on the development of civism as it contributed to ancient Greek culture, and helped shape the psychology of citizenship in the Western world. The strength of this work is its interdisciplinary examination of those trends and influences that combined to give new insights into the rise and the fall of democracy in the ancient polis of Athens. The author presents an extensive description of the intellectual forces that attracted «international» scholars and teachers to Athens, who in turn established important schools of higher learning as they labored to develop and advance the study of rhetoric and philosophy as competing alternative approaches for addressing the perceived weakness of the democratic system. This volume is an ideal supplement for instruction in courses in classical history, political science, philosophy, history of Western education, and advanced foundations of education.

Kinship in Thucydides

This volume explores the relationship between Thucydides and ancient Greek historiography, sociology, and culture.

Kinship in Thucydides

Author: Maria Fragoulaki

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199697779

Page: 443

View: 796

This volume explores the relationship between Thucydides and ancient Greek historiography, sociology, and culture. Offering a new interpretation of the Peloponnesian War and its historian, it focuses on the role of emotions and ethics in the context of political history and ethnic conflicts. Drawing on modern anthropological enquiries on kinship and the sociology of ethnicity and emotions, and on scholarly work on kinship diplomacy and Greek ethnicity, it arguesthat inter-communal kinship has a far more pervasive importance in Thucydides than has so far been acknowledged. Through new readings of the History, such topics as Thucydides' narrative technique, hischallenging silences, his interaction with other genres, and his intense engagement with Herodotus are dissected and discussed - offering a new appreciation of his unique contribution to historiography.

Kinship Diplomacy in the Ancient World

THE CLASSICAL AGE OF GREE CE ... Among Greek cities, Athens combined
power and the arts in an unprecedented flowering, which was to make it ever
after the symbol of Greek culture, the "Hellas of Hellas." The historian of
diplomacy is ...

Kinship Diplomacy in the Ancient World

Author: George Martin Lane Professor of the Classics and of History Emeritus Christopher P Jones

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674505278

Page: 193

View: 926

In this study of the political uses of perceived kinship from the Homeric age to Byzantium, Jones provides an unparalleled view of mythic belief in action and addresses fundamental questions about communal and national identity.

Reciprocity in Ancient Greece

Littman , R . J . ( 1979 ) , ' Kinship in Athens ' , Ancient Society 10 : 5 - 31 . Lloyd ,
G . E . R . ( 1966 ) , Polarity and Analogy ( Cambridge ) . - ( 1990 ) , Plato and
Archytas in the Seventh Letter ' , Phronesis 35 : 159 – 74 . Lloyd - Jones , H . (
1983 ) ...

Reciprocity in Ancient Greece

Author: Christopher Gill

Publisher: Clarendon Press

ISBN: 9780198149972

Page: 370

View: 562

Reciprocity has been seen as an important notion for anthropologists studying economic and social relations, and this volume examines it in connection with Greek culture from Homer to the Hellenistic period.

Law Violence and Community in Classical Athens

While not all family quarrels may have led to long - term bitter enmity , the extant
Athenian inheritance cases indicate ... of Athenian litigation that made it difficult
for courts to discover the " truth ” of allegations about kinship and testamentary ...

Law  Violence  and Community in Classical Athens

Author: David Cohen

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521388375

Page: 214

View: 542

Using comparative anthropological and historical perspectives, this analysis of the legal regulation of violence in Athenian society challenges traditional accounts of the development of the legal process. It examines theories of social conflict and the rule of law as well as actual litigation.

The Associations of Classical Athens

... known from the contemporary sources for classical Athens, do not, with a
single exception (to be noted in due course), ... for ancient Greek historians to
think of the genos as a well-defined and organized extended kinship group
resembling ...

The Associations of Classical Athens

Author: Nicholas F. Jones

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780195352832

Page: 368

View: 677

Jones' book examines the associations of ancient Athens under the classical democracy (508/7-321 B.C.) in light of their relations to the central government. Associations of all types--village communities, cultic groups, brotherhoods, sacerdotal families, philosophical schools, and others--emerge as fundamentally similar instances of Aristotelian koinoniai. Each, it is argued, acquired its distinctive character in response to particular features of the contemporary democracy. The analysis results in the first integrated, holistic institutional reconstruction of Greece's first city.

Conceptions of Kinship

Genetic model was invented in the 20th century to accommodate knowledge
about the mechanics of biological kinship ... Because of this series of similarities
between family and kinship norms in ancient Judaism and classical Athens , it
may ...

Conceptions of Kinship

Author: Bernard Farber

Publisher: New York : Elsevier North Holland

ISBN:

Page: 250

View: 640

The Ecology of the Ancient Greek World

... olives and vines which the Athenian ephebes swore to defend in their oath and
which Alkibiades urged the Athenians to ... classical Greeks did, but consists of
the descendants of Albanian immigrants into Greece - no kinship with the ancient
 ...

The Ecology of the Ancient Greek World

Author: Research Fellow in Biomolecular Sciences Robert Sallares

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 9780801426155

Page: 588

View: 613

A pioneering study in historical population biology, this book offers the first comprehensive ecological history of the ancient Greek world. It proposes a new model for treating the relationship between the population and the land, centering on the distribution and abundance of living organisms.

Ancient Athens Modern Ideology

There is no role assigned to tribes or other large kinship groups . In the twenty
years Odysseus was away from Ithaca , the nobles behaved scandalously
towards his family and his possessions ; yet his son Telemachus had no body of
kinsmen ...

Ancient Athens   Modern Ideology

Author: Mohammad Nafissi

Publisher: Institute of Classical Studies

ISBN:

Page: 325

View: 634

The question of the foundations of the Athenian political economy has stimulated much debate from the late 19th century and throughout the 20th century, perhaps the three best-known proponents being Max Weber, Karl Polanyi and, most recently, Moses Finley. Based on his doctoral research, Mohammed Nafissi examines the dialogue between the primitivist/substantivist, and modernist and Marxist camps attempting to presents a consensual resolution to the debate by examining the interplay of values, theories and evidence' in the works of these three scholars. Focusing on each figure in turn, but tracing particular debates throughout the chapters, he presents a critique of their theories, suggesting how and why they were wrong about the rise of Athems and its achievements and how issues such as Marxism, socialism and modernism figured in their debates.

A History of Marriage Systems

sequently it will be useful here to look briefly at modes of reckoning kinship as
they relate to patterns of inheritance and incest rules , as discussed by Bernard
Farber in Conceptions of Kinship ( 1981 ) . Ancient Israel , ancient Athens , and
the ...

A History of Marriage Systems

Author: Gladys Robina Quale

Publisher: New York : Greenwood Press

ISBN:

Page: 399

View: 208

Readers seeking a historical and cross-cultural treatment of marriage and the family will not be disappointed by this book. A readable and comprehensive account of marriage, rich in colorful social history, Quale's work excels in the comparison of lines of development among the foremost cultures of the world. Particularly impressive in this regard is her treatment of the Eastern civilizations and how these differed from what demographic historians have come to call the `West European pattern' of marriage....Although written as a history, this book should be of interest to students of the family in the social sciences. While it is not a path-breaking work in the sense of providing significant novel conceptual or theoretical insights, it skillfully incorporates theoretical and empirical contributions from a multitude of disciplines. It devotes considerable attention to contemporary trends and consistently relates the institution of the family to the overall socioeconomic, political, and demographic contingencies within society....Quale has written an important book that contains a wealth of useful informaton and deserves serious consideration for use in graduate and undergraduate instruction. Journal of Marriage and the Family This is the first general worldwide history of marriage systems. Though it is comprehensive, it also uses contemporary American trends to illustrate broader tendencies in significant and sometimes dramatic ways. After going back to the earliest generations of human life to seek the roots of why and how human beings came to marry, it explores the various points in family life at which marriages are made, dissolved, and remade. It treats marriage systems as a basis for understanding how not only families, but whole societies operate. The functioning of a marriage system is perceived to be fully related to the overall economic and political situation within which families and individuals must make their way. The overall situation is looked at in a historical context, reflecting a condition of constant change. Quale traces the gradual modifications in patterns through the rise of agriculture and herding into commercial-urban societies and on to contemporary industrial-commercial life, comparing lines of development in the major regions of the world.

Demosthenes the Orator

Harris, Edward M. 'Apotimema: Athenian Terminology for Real Security in Leases
and Dowry Agreements', Classical ... Humphreys, S. C. 'Kinship Patterns in the
Athenian Courts', Greek, Roman and Byzantine Studies 27 (1986) 57–91.

Demosthenes the Orator

Author: Douglas M. MacDowell

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191608734

Page: 472

View: 765

In the most comprehensive account available of the texts of Demosthenes, Douglas M. MacDowell describes and assesses all of the great orator's speeches, including those for the lawcourts as well as the addresses to the Ekklesia. Besides the genuine speeches, MacDowell also covers those which have probably wrongly been ascribed to Demosthenes, such as the ones written for delivery by Apollodorus; and he considers too the Epistles, the Prooemia, and the puzzling Erotic Speech.