Reforms in Islamic Education

Nonetheless, whether or not madrasas are on a par with other education
institutes, one cannot undermine the influence of the labour market on ... Almost
all the reform attempts in Pakistani madrasas involve the following suggested
reforms.

Reforms in Islamic Education

Author: Charlene Tan

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 1441177558

Page: 264

View: 935

In recent times, there has been intense global interest on and scrutiny of Islamic education. In reforming Islamic schools, what are the key actions initiated and are they contested or negotiated by and among Muslims? This edited collection brings together leading scholars to explore current reforms in Islamic schools. Drawing together international case studies, Reforms in Islamic Education critically discusses the reforms, considering the motivations for them, nature of them and perceptions and experiences of people affected by them. The contributors also explore the tensions, resistance, contestations and negotiations between Muslims and non-Muslims, and among Muslims, in relation to the reforms. Highlighting the need to understand and critique reforms in Islamic schools within broad historical, political and socio-cultural contexts, this book is a valuable resource for academics, policymakers and educators.

Muslim Education in the 21st Century

Madrasas medieval and modern: Politics, education, and the problem of Muslim
identity. In Robert W. Hefner and Muhammad ... In Robert M. Hathaway (Ed.),
Education Reform in Pakistan: Buildingfor the Future (pp. 15–31). Washington,
DC: ...

Muslim Education in the 21st Century

Author: Sa’eda Buang

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317815009

Page: 224

View: 602

Muslim Education in the 21st Century reinvestigates the current state of affairs in Muslim education in Asia whilst at the same time paying special attention to Muslim schools’ perception of educational changes and the reasons for such changes. It highlights and explores the important question of whether the Muslim school has been reinventing itself in the field of pedagogy and curriculum to meet the challenges of the 21st century education. It interrogates the schools whose curriculum content carry mostly the subject of religion and Islam as its school culture. Typologically, these include state-owned or privately-run madrasah or dayah in Aceh, Indonesia; pondok, traditional Muslim schools largely prevalent in the East Malaysian states and Indonesia; pesantren, Muslim boarding schools commonly found in Indonesia; imam-khatip schools in Turkey, and other variations in Asia. Contributed by a host of international experts, Muslim Education in the 21st Century focuses on how Muslim educators strive to deal with the educational contingencies of their times and on Muslim schools’ perception of educational changes and reasons for such changes. It will be of great interest to anyone interested in Asian and Muslim education.

Public Papers of the Presidents of the United States

... the Pakistani Government matters . We want to help him achieve his on
education reform . ... This is the jihad that we on the madrasa school issue in
Pakistan . are engaged now and we have initiated . One of the things that most
impressed ...

Public Papers of the Presidents of the United States

Author: United States. President

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page:

View: 246

"Containing the public messages, speeches, and statements of the President", 1956-1992.

Education Reform in Pakistan

The Pakistan Madrasah Education Board would function better if it had a
permanent chairman and secretary , who are ... Presently , the administrative
authority and the funding for reform of Islamic education belong to different
ministries .

Education Reform in Pakistan

Author: Shahid Javed Burki

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page: 172

View: 870

Washington seems to be in a season of worrying--some might say "obsessing"--About the education system in Pakistan. The 9/11 Commission, whose final report has become a fixture on the bestseller lists, has highlighted the links between international terrorism and Pakistan's religious seminaries, or "madaris", and recommended that the United States support Pakistani efforts to improve the quality of the education it offers its young. The The American government, with the U.S. Agency for International Development as the lead agency, plans to spend tens of millions of dollars this year alone on primary education and literacy programs in Pakistan. The international donor community has been active on this front for decades, but has significantly expanded its activities in recent years. But most of all, Pakistanis themselves have raised the alarm and encouraged this newfound interest in their schools. This volume explores an issue that Pakistanis themselves have identified as vital to their national well-being. Essays include: (1) Educating the Pakistani Masses (Shahid Javed Burki); (2) Education, Employment and Economic Development in Pakistan (Ishrat Husain); (3) Challenges in the Education Sector in Pakistan (Salman Shah); (4) Reform in Higher Education in Pakistan (Grace Clark); (5) Against the Tide: Role of The Citizens Foundation in Pakistani Education (Ahsan Saleem); (6) Reasons for Rage: Reflections on the Education System of Pakistan with Special Reference to English (Tariq Rahman); (7) Education Sector Reforms in Pakistan: Demand Generation as an Alternative Recipe (Jonathan Mitchell, Salman Humayun, and Irfan Muzaffar); (8) Report for Congress on Education Reform in Pakistan; (9) Education in Pakistan and the World Bank's Program (Michelle Riboud); (10) The Punjab Education Sector Reform Program 2003-2006; (11) Pakistan's Recent Experience in Reforming Islamic Education (Christopher Candland); and (12) Pakistan: Reforming the Education Sector. An introduction by Robert M. Hathaway is included. Individual papers contain tables, charts, notes and references.

Pakistan

For the ulema , the primary significance of madrasa education lies in its being the
most effective vehicle for preserving their ... views on the social role , religious
significance , and political consequences of madrasa education that reform
efforts ...

Pakistan

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page:

View: 699

Secularism and Spirituality

Seeking Integrated Knowledge and Success in Madrasah Education in
Singapore Noor Aisha Abdul Rahman, Ah Eng Lai. The resistance by some
religious elites to madrasah reform in Pakistan remains a most important factor .
A mere ...

Secularism and Spirituality

Author: Noor Aisha Abdul Rahman

Publisher: Marshall Cavendish Academic

ISBN:

Page: 191

View: 100

This book aims to understand the current state and complexity of madrasah education in Singapore, and to identify some key issues affecting the field in particular, and education and society in general. It also aims to serve as an intellectual contribution to the ongoing debates and concerns in the field and which affect the interests of Muslim and national communities.

Islamic Education Diversity and National Identity

Governments, such as those of India, Pakistan, and, of course, countries in the
West, particularly the US, are now eagerly ... Arguments for madrasa reform often
miss the point that, as many Muslims see it, the madrasa is not meant to be an ...

Islamic Education  Diversity and National Identity

Author: Jan-Peter Hartung

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN: 0761934324

Page: 331

View: 929

Providing a variety of perspectives, Islamic Education, Diversity and National Identity: Dini Madaris in India Post 9/11 addresses a number of important questions from various angles. The 12 original essays of this volume discuss the phenomenon of dini madaris from a historical perspective, regional perspective, and examine current developments while drawing insights mainly from recently conducted fieldwork. The contributors discuss crucial issues like gender and the role of the media. The volume concludes that dini madaris, contrary to their public image, are not essentially opposed to change, even though the framework for change appears to be limited.

Policy Perspectives

For the Government of Pakistan , the set of suggestions briefly included :
establishing a madrasa regulatory authority to ... to provide financial assistance to
government Programs to reform the madrasa education sector only if the
government ...

Policy Perspectives

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page:

View: 540

The Muslim World After 9 11

Consequently, the authorities are seeking to relocate religious education within
the national school system to ... Foster Madrassa Reform Promoting educational
reform is therefore an important component of a shaping strategy in the Muslim ...

The Muslim World After 9 11

Author: Angel Rabasa

Publisher: Rand Corporation

ISBN: 9780833037121

Page: 525

View: 571

Examines the dynamics that drive changes in the religio-political landscape of the Muslim world, the effects of 9/11, the global war on terrorism, and the war in Iraq. The authors present a typology of ideological tendencies; identify the factors that produce religious extremism and violence; assess key cleavages along sectarian, ethnic, regional, and national lines; and identify possible strategies and military options for the United States to pursue in this critical and volatile part of the world.

Madrasa Education

With General Pervez Musharraf's recent announcements to reform and regulate
madrasas in Pakistan they have intensified their campaign even more. The VHP
and RSS leaders come up with new suggestions every day but they are too less ...

Madrasa Education

Author: Muhammadullah Khalili Qasmi

Publisher:

ISBN: 9788178271132

Page: 212

View: 444

With reference to India.

Islam and Education Conflict and Conformity in Pakistan

Education Reform in Pakistan . CRS Report to Congress ... Madrasa Education in
India : A Study of its Past and present . Chandigarh , India : Centre for ... Kumar ,
Nita ( 2000 ) . Lessons from Schools : the History of Education in Banaras .

Islam and Education  Conflict and Conformity in Pakistan

Author: Saleem. H Ali

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Page: 214

View: 232

An empirical study of madrassahs in Pakistan focusing on two case studies; Islamabad and southern Punjab. In addition, the book considers the questionable linkage between Islamic education and conflict from a theological as well as historical perspective. The author concludes with a clear set of policy recommendations for Muslim and non-Muslim constituents to reduce conflict escalation.

Development and Faith

Development and Faith explores and highlights promising partnerships in the world between secular and faith development entities. It recounts the evolving history of relationships between faith and secular development institutions.

Development and Faith

Author: Katherine Marshall

Publisher: World Bank Publications

ISBN: 0821371746

Page: 329

View: 278

Publisher's description: The faith and development nexus is both a promising new focus for secular development agencies and a historic reality: for centuries, world faiths and individuals inspired by their faith have played many roles in social change and social welfare. Secular development agencies have largely operated in parallel to the world of faith-motivated development. The World Bank began in the late 1990s to explore ways in which faith and development are connected. The issue was not and is not about religion, but about the recognition that some of &… Show Morethe best experts on development are faith leaders living and working in poor communities, where strong ties and moral authority give them unique experience and insight. The World Bank's goal is to act as a catalyst and convenor, bringing together development practitioners to find common ground, understand one another's efforts, and explore differences. Development and Faith explores and highlights promising partnerships in the world between secular and faith development entities. It recounts the evolving history of relationships between faith and secular development institutions. It focuses on the Millennium Development Goals as a common framework for action and an opportunity for new forms of collaboration and partnership.

Madrasas and Ngos Complements Or Substitutes Non State Providers and Growth in Female Education in Bangladesh

type of school participating in this project received government funding
depending upon the number of females enrolled in ... to correctly inform the
current debate over madrasa reform in other South Asian countries such as India
and Pakistan.

Madrasas and Ngos  Complements Or Substitutes  Non   State Providers and Growth in Female Education in Bangladesh

Author: Mohammad Niaz Asadullah

Publisher: World Bank Publications

ISBN:

Page: 20

View: 819

Abstract: There has been a proliferation of non-state providers of education services in the developing world. In Bangladesh, for instance, Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee runs more than 40,000 non-formal schools that cater to school-drop outs from poor families or operate in villages where there's little provision for formal schools. This paper presents a rationale for supporting these schools on the basis of their spillover effects on female enrollment in secondary (registered) madrasa schools (Islamic faith schools). Most madrasa high schools in Bangladesh are financed by the sate and include a modern curriculum alongside traditional religious subjects. Using an establishment-level dataset on student enrollment in secondary schools and madrasas, the authors demonstrate that the presence of madrasas is positively associated with secondary female enrollment growth. Such feminization of madrasas is therefore unique and merits careful analysis. The authors test the effects of the Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee primary schools on growth in female enrollment in madrasas. The analysis deals with potential endoegeneity by using data on number of the number of school branches and female members in the sub-district. The findings show that madrasas that are located in regions with a greater number of Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee schools have higher growth in female enrollment. This relationship is further strengthened by the finding that there is, however, no effect of these schools on female enrollment growth in secular schools.

Religion in Development

In contrast to this embrace of internal reform , in many Muslim countries
madrasas have actively resisted state - led attempts at curricular reforms . This
resistance encompasses the tensions inherent in the religious and the secular
notions of education and ideal learning . ... The madrasa leadership in Pakistan ,
for instance , has actively resisted the USA - sponsored madrasa reform
programme initiated ...

Religion in Development

Author: Séverine Deneulin

Publisher: Zed Books

ISBN:

Page: 184

View: 783

This timely new book expertly explores the treatment of religion in the evolution of development thought. The book argues that development theory and practice needs to rewrite its dominant script regarding its treatment of religion, a script which has so far been heavily inscribed in the secular tradition. In addition to providing a conceptual framework for analyzing the role of religion in development, the book provides numerous empirical examples drawn from the Christian and Islamic religious traditions. This comprehensive new guide to this key issue is essential for students, development thinkers and practitioners who wish to understand better the role that religion plays in development processes and outcomes.

Madrasa Education Framework

Is it the right way to reform madrasas ? ( Is the government successful in its aim to
reform madrasas ? ) It is uncertain that the government is successful in its aim or
not . What , do you think , is the difference between Indian and Pakistani ...

Madrasa Education Framework

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page: 180

View: 568

Madaris In India And Their System Of Education Has Always Been A Subject Of Discussion And Debate Foa A Long Time And A Host Researches Were Done On The Subject In The Past. Yet, The 9/11 Event Has Attracted The Attention Of Media Towards Madaris Worldwide. The Book The Madrasa Framework Is A Research Work Of Muhammad Sajid Qasmi. Being The Work Of A Madrasa Product The Book Ventures Into A Unique Theme Not Many Research Scholars Would Have The Conviction To Step Into. Contents Covers- 1. Why The Need Of Madrasa Education Arose? 2. Who Were The Protagonists Of This Education System? 3. Do The Subjects Taught At Arabic Madrasas Curriculum (If We Compare It With That Of Contemporary Education System Of Public And Government Schools); 5. The Difference Between The Subject Matter And Teaching Methodology Of The Two Systems (Madrasa And Modern School); 6. Student`S Background In Madrasas; 7. View Of Contemporary Educationists Regarding Madrasa Education.

New perspectives on Pakistan

their worst fear and the clergy have successfully resisted government efforts to
reform. ... this reform package, Zia directed the University Grants Commission to
draw up criteria of equivalence for degrees and certificates for madrasa
education.

New perspectives on Pakistan

Author: Heather Bolton

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN:

Page: 114

View: 490

Revised version of papers presented at an international conference held at New York during 11-13 April 2003.

The Rational Believer

Choices and Decisions in the Madrasas of Pakistan Masooda Bano ... Student
dress, their mannerisms, and their way of speech do no differ from the school
children. ... of their mind-set, they follow many of the orthodox Islamic principles
as in case of the Qaumi madrasas thereby showing a dual failure of the reform
program.

The Rational Believer

Author: Masooda Bano

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 0801464331

Page: 264

View: 386

Islamic schools, or madrasas, have been accused of radicalizing Muslims and participating, either actively or passively, in terrorist networks since the events of 9/11. In Pakistan, the 2007 siege by government forces of Islamabad’s Red Mosque and its madrasa complex, whose imam and students staged an armed resistance against the state for its support of the "war on terror," reinforced concerns about madrasas’ role in regional and global jihad. By 2006 madrasas registered with Pakistan’s five regulatory boards for religious schools enrolled over one million male and 200,000 female students. In The Rational Believer, Masooda Bano draws on rich interview, ethnographic, and survey data, as well as fieldwork conducted in madrasas throughout the country to explore the network of Pakistani madrasas. She maps the choices and decisions confronted by students, teachers, parents, and clerics and explains why available choices make participation in jihad appear at times a viable course of action. Bano's work shows that beliefs are rational and that religious believers look to maximize utility in ways not captured by classical rational choice. She applies analytical tools from the New Institutional Economics to explain apparent contradictions in the madrasa system—for example, how thousands of young Pakistani women now demand the national adoption of traditional sharia law, despite its highly restrictive limits on female agency, and do so from their location in Islamic schools for girls that were founded only a generation ago.