Persecutory Delusions

This book is the first to pull together these different perspectives under one cover. For scientists and practitioners who study and treat psychosis this is a remarkable resource.

Persecutory Delusions

Author: Daniel Freeman

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN:

Page: 435

View: 987

Paranoia is the fear that others intend to cause you harm. It occurs most dramatically as delusions of persecution in conditions such as schizophrenia, but it is related to suspicious thoughts that occur in some 10-20% of the general population. Typical concerns might be that people are tryingto harm you, saying bad things behind your back, deliberately irritating you, or conspiring against you. It is one of the most significant psychiatric problems, and increasingly, researchers and clinicians have begun to focus on understanding paranoid experience.In this landmark publication, the three major authorities in the field bring together the current knowledge about the assessment, understanding, and treatment of persecutory delusions. Leading experts in cognitive psychology, neuropsychology, psychiatry, social psychiatry, neuroimaging, andneuroscience explain their perspectives on paranoia. Pharmacological, cognitive, and family interventions are comprehensively reviewed, and personal accounts of paranoia are included.'"Persecutory Delusions" is an outstanding book that provides a unique update on the assessment, biological and psychological processes, and treatment of this important clinical phenomenon. Freeman, Bentall, and Garety, all seasoned clinicians who have also made valuable contributions to theoriesof delusions, have assembled world experts on this topic for the first time in this welcomed volume. The state-of-the-art summary of research, theory, and clinical practice related to persecutory delusions make this book a critical resource for anyone seeking to understand or treat psychosis.'Professor Kim T. Mueser, Dartmouth Medical School' Delusions have long been known to psychiatry - but have largely been considered a subset of 'psychosis'. However, over the last decade a range of scientists, psychologists, phenomenologists, pharmacologists, and imagers have been studying delusions in their own right, and social epidemiologistsand geneticists have been looking for their causes in clinical populations and wider society. This book is the first to pull together these different perspectives under one cover. For scientists and practitioners who study and treat psychosis this is a remarkable resource. This will be a "go to"reference book for developing a comprehensive understanding of delusions.'Professor Shitij Kapur, Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London

Paranoia

Paranoia is the suspicion that other intend to cause you harm. It is a common experience in the general population, though often overlooked. In its most severe form, paranoia occurs as persecutory delusions.

Paranoia

Author: Daniel Freeman

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 9781841695228

Page: 188

View: 579

Paranoia is the suspicion that other intend to cause you harm. It is a common experience in the general population, though often overlooked. In its most severe form, paranoia occurs as persecutory delusions. Paranoia, written by leading researchers in this field, is the first cognitive psychology book to have persecutory delusions as its focus. Scholarly, comprehensive and illustrated by clinical examples throughout, this study defines the phenomena in detail and analyses the content of persecutory delusions. It reviews previous psychological writings, explores the relationship between psychosis and neurosis, reports on innovative empirical studies with patients, and highlights future essential research directions. Paranoia outlines a new theoretical model of the formation and maintenance of persecutory delusions, providing an excellent guide to this important clinical topic. It will be of great interest and use to all psychiatrists and clinical psychologists who work in this field.

Persecutory Delusions and First person Authority

Although clinical diagnosis of delusions is usually not difficult, defining delusions is more complicated. This study analyzes the concept of delusions, in particular persecutory delusions.

Persecutory Delusions and First person Authority

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page:

View: 387

Although clinical diagnosis of delusions is usually not difficult, defining delusions is more complicated. This study analyzes the concept of delusions, in particular persecutory delusions. Patients with persecutory delusions are convinced of others' malicious intentions and are impervious to counterevidence. Conventionally, expression of intention is accepted at face value unless contradictory evidence is available. First-person authority regarding intention is respected in human society. Contemporary philosophy tends to limit the scope of first-person authority, but it cannot be eliminated. Persecutory delusions contravene first-person authority as one of the fundamental principles of daily life, even in the absence of malicious intention on the part of the patients. Two ways of denying others' first-person authority are investigated. This study adds new insight to Manfred Spitzer's formal definition of delusions.

A Casebook of Cognitive Therapy for Psychosis

Anxiety may, therefore, trigger processes that provide evidence or substantiation
for persecutory beliefs. Consistent with this idea, individuals with persecutory
delusions have been found to demonstrate preferential processing of threat
words ...

A Casebook of Cognitive Therapy for Psychosis

Author: Anthony P. Morrison

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 9781583912058

Page: 308

View: 521

Leading clinicians and researchers in the field of cognitive therapy for psychosis illustrate their individual approaches to the understanding of the difficulties faced by people with psychosis.

Advances in Schizophrenia Research 2009

In D. Freeman, R. Bentall, & P. Garety (Eds.), Persecutory delusions (pp 23–52).
... Worry, worry processes and dimensions of delusions: An exploratory
investigation of a role for anxiety processes in the maintenance of delusional
distress.

Advances in Schizophrenia Research 2009

Author: Wagner F. Gattaz

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9781441909138

Page: 465

View: 975

Schizophrenia remains an important challenge to psychiatry, with its causes and underlying brain mechanisms yet to be fully revealed. Currently available treatments are neither universally effective nor without unwanted effects. These aspects, together with the high prevalence of schizophrenia, its often debilitating nature, and the associated family and social burden, make this mental disorder one of the most complex public health issues of our times. The purpose of the Advances in Schizophrenia Research series is to provide comprehensive periodic reviews of the wide range of research studies carried out around the world, with the dual purpose of solving the schizophrenia puzzle, and providing clues to new forms of treatment and prevention for this disorder. A special feature of the series is its broad scope, virtually encompassing all fields of schizophrenia research: epidemiology and risk factors; psychopathology; diagnostic boundaries; cognition; outcome and prognosis; pathophysiology; genetics; pharmacological and psychological forms of treatment and rehabilitation; community care; and stigmatization.

Delusion and Self Deception

65–66). In this connection, he specifically mentions persecutory delusions;
however, in fact, theories of persecutory delusions often appeal to motivational
factors (see Bentall, Corcoran, Howard, Blackwood, & Kinderman, 2001, for a
review).

Delusion and Self Deception

Author: Tim Bayne

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 1136874860

Page: 310

View: 173

This collection of essays focuses on the interface between delusions and self-deception. As pathologies of belief, delusions and self-deception raise many of the same challenges for those seeking to understand them. Are delusions and self-deception entirely distinct phenomena, or might some forms of self-deception also qualify as delusional? To what extent might models of self-deception and delusion share common factors? In what ways do affect and motivation enter into normal belief-formation, and how might they be implicated in self-deception and delusion? The essays in this volume tackle these questions from both empirical and conceptual perspectives. Some contributors focus on the general question of how to locate self-deception and delusion within our taxonomy of psychological states. Some contributors ask whether particular delusions - such as the Capgras delusion or anosognosia for hemiplegia - might be explained by appeal to motivational and affective factors. And some contributors provide general models of motivated reasoning, against which theories of pathological belief-formation might be measured. The volume will be of interest to cognitive scientists, clinicians, and philosophers interested in the nature of belief and the disturbances to which it is subject.

Guilty Acts Guilty Minds

Delusions of reference commonly go hand-in-hand with delusions of persecution.
126 As with delusions of reference, the link between lost agency and persecutory
delusions isn't obvious or direct. Still, a link there might well be.127 When an ...

Guilty Acts  Guilty Minds

Author: Stephen P. Garvey

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0190924330

Page: 320

View: 369

When someone commits a crime, what are the limits on a state's authority to define them as worthy of blame, and thus liable to punishment? This book answers that question, building on two ideas familiar to criminal lawyers: actus reus and mens rea, usually translated as "guilty act" and "guilty mind." In Guilty Acts, Guilty Minds, Stephen P. Garvey proposes an understanding of actus reus and mens rea as limits on the authority of a state, and in particular the authority of a democratic state, to ascribe guilt to those accused of crime. Garvey argues that actus reus and mens rea are necessary conditions for legitimate state punishment. Drawing on the work of political philosophers, moral philosophers, and criminal law theorists, Garvey provides clear explanations of how these concepts apply to a wide variety of cases. The book charges readers to consider practical examples and ask: whatever you believe regarding the justice of the rules, did the state act within the scope of its legitimate authority when it enacted those rules into law? Based on extensive research, this book presents a new theory in which the concepts of actus reus and mens rea mark the limits of state power rather than simply describe the elements of a crime. Making the compelling distinction between legitimacy and justice, Guilty Acts, Guilty Minds provides an important perspective on the limits of state authority.