Rabbinic Stories

Stories from the major works of classical Rabbinic literature produced between 200 and 600 C.E.

Rabbinic Stories

Author: Shaye J. D. Cohen

Publisher: Paulist Press

ISBN: 9780809105335

Page: 315

View: 239

Stories from the major works of classical Rabbinic literature produced between 200 and 600 C.E.

Theology in Rabbinic Stories

This book by Rabbi Chaim Pearl introduces readers to the folkloric content of the Talmud and probes the theological and ethical themes in the stories related by the sages and rabbis who told them.

Theology in Rabbinic Stories

Author: Chaim Pearl

Publisher: Hendrickson Pub

ISBN: 9781565632851

Page: 180

View: 152

This book by Rabbi Chaim Pearl introduces readers to the folkloric content of the Talmud and probes the theological and ethical themes in the stories related by the sages and rabbis who told them.

Form Function and Historical Significance of the Rabbinic Story in Yerushalmi Neziqin

( b ) They abbreviated sto והיך אמרין and את שמע מינה , ויידא אמרה דא ( 1 ) For the
following reasons the stories in the y . Bavot were not created by the y . Bavot
editors , but were traditions which the editors had before them : ( a ) The stories
usually ...

Form  Function  and Historical Significance of the Rabbinic Story in Yerushalmi Neziqin

Author: Catherine Hezser

Publisher: Mohr Siebeck

ISBN: 9783161461484

Page: 437

View: 744

Revised version of the author's thesis (Ph. D.)--Jewish Theological Seminary of America, 1992.

Talmudic Stories

The book features an appendix including the original Hebrew/Aramaic texts for the reader's reference.

Talmudic Stories

Author: Jeffrey L. Rubenstein

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 9780801861468

Page: 435

View: 644

The book features an appendix including the original Hebrew/Aramaic texts for the reader's reference.

Rewriting Ancient Jewish History

In light of such exhortations to carefully preserve the teachings of the past,
traditionalists conclude that rabbinic sages were ... According to the traditional
historical method, rabbinic stories ultimately stem from reliable eyewitness
accounts.

Rewriting Ancient Jewish History

Author: Amram Tropper

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317247086

Page: 228

View: 741

Half a century ago, the primary contours of the history of the Jews in Roman times were not subject to much debate. This standard account collapsed, however, when a handful of insights undermined the traditional historical method, the method long enlisted by historians for eliciting facts from sources. In response to these insights, a new historical method gradually emerged. Rewriting Ancient Jewish History critiques the traditional historical method and makes a case for the new one, illustrating how to write anew ancient Jewish history. At the heart of the traditional historical method lie three fundamental presumptions. The traditional historical method regularly presumes that multiple versions of a text or tradition are equally authentic; it presumes that many ancient Jewish sources are the products of largely immanent forces of cloistered Jewish communities; and, barring any local grounds for suspicion, it presumes that most ancient Jewish texts faithfully reflect their sources and reliably recount events. Rewriting Ancient Jewish History unfurls the failings of this approach; it promotes the new historical method which circumvents the flawed traditional presumptions while plotting anew the limits of rational argumentation in historical inquiry. This crucial reappraisal is a must-read for students of Jewish and Roman history alike, and a fascinating case-study in how historians should approach their ancient sources.

Jews and Judaism in the Rabbinic Era

However, it appears that we have advanced beyond the days when a historical
narrative of the talmudic era was crafted mainly from a patchwork of rabbinic
stories, which were considered basically reliable as long as miracles and other ...

Jews and Judaism in the Rabbinic Era

Author: Isaiah Gafni

Publisher: Mohr Siebeck

ISBN: 3161527313

Page: 557

View: 302

"This collection of essays by Isaiah M. Gafni reflects over forty years of research on central issues of Jewish history in one of its formative eras. Questions relating to representations of the past, beginning with Josephus but primarily in rabbinic and post-rabbinic literature, represent an axial theme in this volume. Throughout the collection the author addresses the tension between realities on the ground and the historiography that shaped the image of that reality for all subsequent generations. Two specifc clusters of studies analyze the emergence and development of the Babylonian rabbinic community, as well as the complex relationship between the Judaean centre and the Jewish diaspora in Late Antiquity. A final selection of essays examines the impact of modern ideologies and revised methods of research on the image of Jewish life and rabbinic leadership in late antique Judaism."--

Simeon the Righteous in Rabbinic Literature

Hence,likethetemporalgap between Simeon's lifetime and the formulation of
rabbinic literature, the literary nature of rabbinic stories also thwarts traditional
attempts to write Simeon's biography. We cannot discern the historical kernels of
 ...

Simeon the Righteous in Rabbinic Literature

Author: Amram Tropper

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9004245022

Page: 258

View: 708

In Simeon the Righteous in Rabbinic Literature: A Legend Reinvented, Amram Tropper investigates the rabbinic traditions about Simeon the Righteous, a renowned Jewish leader of Second Temple times, and the history of their formation.

How Not to Study Judaism Parables rabbinic narratives rabbis biographies rabbis disputes

Jeffrey L. Rubenstein, Rabbinic Stories, Preface by Shaye J. D. Cohen. New York
and Mahwah, NJ: Paulist Press, 2002. THE CLASSICS OF WESTERN
SPIRITUALITY. This anthology is uncritical, misleading, and unoriginal. That is
because ...

How Not to Study Judaism  Parables  rabbinic narratives  rabbis  biographies  rabbis  disputes

Author: Jacob Neusner

Publisher: University Press of America

ISBN: 9780761827825

Page:

View: 363

In How Not to Study Judaism : Examples and Counter-Examples, Jacob Neusner presents a collection of essays and book reviews that identify the wrong way of conducting the academic study of Judaism. Pointing readers toward the right way to pursue the academic study of Judaism, Nuesner's focus is on the study of the literature of Judaism and the culture of the Jewish community.

Rabbinic Parodies of Jewish and Christian Literature

Originally presented as the author's thesis (Ph.D. - Princeton) under the title: Late Antiquity Upside Down: Rabbinic Parodies of Jewish and Christian Literature.

Rabbinic Parodies of Jewish and Christian Literature

Author: Holger M. Zellentin

Publisher: Mohr Siebeck

ISBN: 9783161506475

Page: 275

View: 614

Originally presented as the author's thesis (Ph.D. - Princeton) under the title: Late Antiquity Upside Down: Rabbinic Parodies of Jewish and Christian Literature.

Narrative and Document in the Rabbinic Canon

... Sparta rather than Themistocles and Leonidas Christopher Pelling, citing
Arnaldo Momigliano For a thousand years, from its earliest documents of the
second century C.E. to the High Middle Ages, Rabbinic Judaism told stories
about sages.

Narrative and Document in the Rabbinic Canon

Author: Jacob Neusner

Publisher: University Press of America

ISBN: 0761852123

Page: 320

View: 289

The author states in his preface: For a thousand years, from its earliest documents of the second century to the High Middle Ages, Rabbinic Judaism preferred to compose and collect anecdotes, not to construct of them sustained and connected biographies. This is a study of the inclusion of biographical narratives about sages in some of the components of the unfolding canon of Rabbinic Judaism in the formative age, the documents of the first six centuries C.E., exclusive of the two Talmuds. A sage here is defined as a man who embodies the Rabbinic system. A sage-story, then, is an anecdote about the life and deeds of a Rabbinic sage. A biographical narrative in general is the record of things done on a concrete and specific past-tense occasion by named individuals. The stories are not told as part of a sustained biographical account of those individuals' lives, birth to death. I am able in this way to correlate the unfolding of the authorized biography in the counterpart-Christian one. The documentary hypothesis yields the correlation between the advent of the Christian authorized biography and the advent of the sage-story in the later documents of the Rabbinic canon.

Curious Rabbinic Tales

The tales, legends, parables, and folktales in this book tell of miracles, heroism, cowardice and above all, the poor folk and the wealthy ones.

Curious Rabbinic Tales

Author: Miriam Hoffman

Publisher:

ISBN: 9780999336557

Page: 122

View: 978

The tales, legends, parables, and folktales in this book tell of miracles, heroism, cowardice and above all, the poor folk and the wealthy ones.

The Cambridge History of Judaism Volume 4 The Late Roman Rabbinic Period

ed KATZ Chairman of the Department of Near Eastern Studies and Director of the
Program for Jewish Studies Steven T ... Reconstructions based on rabbinic
stories of specific events in which one can discern the motivations and interests
of ...

The Cambridge History of Judaism  Volume 4  The Late Roman Rabbinic Period

Author: ed KATZ

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521772488

Page: 1164

View: 429

This fourth volume covers the late Roman period to the rise of Islam.

The Social Structure of the Rabbinic Movement in Roman Palestine

If a pattern appears in only one type of stories , that is , if banqueting rabbis are
only mentioned in the introductions of ... A. Informal Meetings In both tannaitic
and amoraic story traditions two to five rabbinic colleagues are depicted as
having ...

The Social Structure of the Rabbinic Movement in Roman Palestine

Author: Catherine Hezser

Publisher: Mohr Siebeck

ISBN: 9783161467974

Page: 557

View: 244

"While rabbinic literature enables us to know more about the rabbis than any of the other members of the Jewish population of Roman Palestine, the social structure of the rabbinic movement remained largely unexplored. In the present study Catherine Hezser combines a critical analysis of the available literary, legal, and epigraphic evi-dence with a selective employment of sociological models. She examines the definition of the boundaries of the rabbinic movement, deals with the nature of the relationships amongst rabbis, and investigates the relationship between rabbis and their contemporaries, that is students, the community, and the patriarch."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Elijah and the Rabbis

Renoir's insight enables the student of rabbinic literature to move beyond the
obvious fact that good stories travel through time and between cultures and start
to look at how smaller units of plot, motifs, and stock characters may have
circulated ...

Elijah and the Rabbis

Author: Kristen H. Lindbeck

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231525478

Page: 272

View: 479

Through an innovative synthesis of narrative critique, oral-formulaic study, folkloric research, and literary analysis, Kristen H. Lindbeck reads all the Elijah narratives in the Babylonian Talmud and details the rise of a distinct, quasi-angelic figure who takes pleasure in ordinary interaction. During the Talmudic period of 50-500 C.E., Elijah developed into a recognizable character quite different from the Elijah of the Bible. The Elijah of the Talmud dispenses wisdom, advice, and, like the Elijah of Jewish folklore, helps people directly, even with material gifts. Lindbeck highlights particular features of the Elijah stories, allowing them to be grouped into generic categories and considered alongside Rabbinic literary motifs and non-Jewish traditions of late antiquity. She compares Elijah in the Babylonian Talmud to a range of characters angels, rabbis, wonder-workers, the angel of death, Christian saints, and even the Greek god Hermes. She concludes with a survey of Elijah's diverse roles from medieval times to today, throwing into brilliant relief the complex relationship between ancient Elijah traditions and later folktales and liturgy that show Elijah bringing benefits and blessings, appearing at circumcisions and Passover, and visiting households after the Sabbath.

Rabbinic Literature and the New Testament

Sages Made Up Sayings and Stories Ample evidence in virtually every document
of rabbinic literature sustains the proposition that it was quite common for sages
to make up sayings and stories and attribute the sayings to, or tell the stories ...

Rabbinic Literature and the New Testament

Author: Jacob Neusner

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN: 1592445195

Page: 208

View: 419

Here is a sustained criticism of the rather facile use of rabbinic literature by New Testament scholarship. In particular, Neusner addresses the writings of Helmut Koester, Samuel Sandmel, Reginald Fuller, Harvey Falk, Geza Vermes, E.P. Sanders, S.J.D. Cohen, Morton Smith, John P. Meier, and Brad H. Young. The book begins with a study of the characteristics of rabbinic literature and a demonstration of why this literature cannot be easily used for the kind of history New Testament scholarship proposes to produce. Then follow critiques of the writings by various New Testament scholars and the differences between Professor Neusner and his critics. A concluding section pays tribute to the New Testament field for all it has taught the author.

The Essential Jewish Stories God Torah Israel Faith

" -- Rabbi Jeffrey K. Salkin, author of Putting God on the Guest List "Through these stories we can understand the Jewish mind at work. This is a book for your bedside, for the classroom and synagogue, and above all for your soul.

The Essential Jewish Stories  God  Torah  Israel   Faith

Author: Seymour Rossel

Publisher: Rossel Books

ISBN: 9780940646452

Page: 450

View: 915

The Essential Jewish Stories contains more than 300 stories selected from every period of Jewish history and from every Jewish teaching tradition -- narratives, anecdotes, metaphors, analogies, folktales, and fantasies. Every story is elegantly retold to emphasize its relevance for our times. The Essential Jewish Stories is arranged thematically for easy access. It includes three indices that make it conveniently simple to find just the right story. Sources are provided for every narrative and many are accompanied by special notes. Perfect for clergy of all faiths, for teachers, for storytellers, and for parents -- for all who wish to initiate discussions of tradition and values with children, friends, and community -- and certainly for those of us who simply love to share a good story. Second Revised Edition with Preface by Dr. Henry Roubicek, author of So, What's Your Story? Discovering the Story in You "The Jewish tradition, perhaps more than most others, has relied on the power of its narratives to maintain the continuity of its peoples at least since the Diaspora. Rossel, in this substantial anthology, has brought together the stories he has used as a rabbi, drawing from scripture, Midrash, folktale, and literary sources. Indexed by festivals, characters, and concepts, this is a rich resource. VERDICT For readers and preachers in both Jewish and Christian traditions." -- LIBRARY JOURNAL "For thousands of years, Jewish scholars have used stories and legends, Midrash, to interpret and explain core religious texts such as the Torah and the Talmud and to impart values to their students. Rossel, a Reform rabbi and educator who loves these stories, has collected more than 300 of them for this book. He has "re-imagined and rewritten" each of the stories to make them accessible to a contemporary audience. He has also done extensive research to track down the original sources of each tale. The notes and the bibliography at the end of the book provide these references for interested readers." -- American Library Association, BOOKLIST "Seymour Rossel has gathered a lifetime's knowledge and study of Jewish stories into one inspiring collection. He draws widely from rabbinic texts, kabbalistic teachings, and Hasidic tales. His notes and sources greatly assist the reader and enrich the book. This one belongs in every Jewish library." -- Howard Schwartz, author of Tree of Souls "Rossel presents a rich collection of the narratives of Judaism, a religion that tells the truth in narrative form. A whole new generation is invited to join the story-tradition." -- Jacob Neusner, author of Judaism: The Basics "For anyone who has ever asked 'what's the story?' Seymour Rossel's book is a God-send. It is filled with stories from the entire sweep of Jewish history -- tales that will move you to tears and to laughter. We have needed this deeply rich resource for quite some time." -- Rabbi Jeffrey K. Salkin, author of Putting God on the Guest List "Through these stories we can understand the Jewish mind at work. This is a book for your bedside, for the classroom and synagogue, and above all for your soul. It is a book for all Jews, scholars and those beginning their Jewish journeys, young and old alike, and for those who would come close to the Jewish essence. You will be nourished for years to come." -- Rabbi Sheldon Zimmerman, author of The Family Prayerbook