Realm Between Empires

Realm. Huge ambitions, large-scale deployment of troops and warships, and
rapid colonial expansion and contraction had ... Peaceful relations between the
Dutch realm and the Atlantic empires were partly predicated on the small size of
the ...

Realm Between Empires

Author: Wim Klooster

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 1501719599

Page: 348

View: 883

"The Dutch Atlantic during an era (following the imperial moment of the seventeenth century) in which Dutch military power declined and Dutch colonies began to chart a more autonomous path. A revisionist history of the eighteenth-century Atlantic world, a counterpoint to the more widely known British and French Atlantic histories"--

The Oxford World History of Empire

Volume Two: the History of Empires Peter Fibiger Bang, C. A. Bayly, Vere
Harmsworth Professor of Imperial and Naval History ... In 806, for example,
Charlemagne himself made provision for the division of his realm between three
of his sons: ...

The Oxford World History of Empire

Author: Peter Fibiger Bang

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 0197532764

Page: 1352

View: 873

This is the first world history of empire, reaching from the third millennium BCE to the present. By combining synthetic surveys, thematic comparative essays, and numerous chapters on specific empires, its two volumes provide unparalleled coverage of imperialism throughout history and across continents, from Asia to Europe and from Africa to the Americas. Only a few decades ago empire was believed to be a thing of the past; now it is clear that it has been and remains one of the most enduring forms of political organization and power. We cannot understand the dynamics and resilience of empire without moving decisively beyond the study of individual cases or particular periods, such as the relatively short age of European colonialism. The history of empire, as these volumes amply demonstrate, needs to be drawn on the much broader canvas of global history. Volume Two: The History of Empires tracks the protean history of political domination from the very beginnings of state formation in the Bronze Age up to the present. Case studies deal with the full range of the historical experience of empire, from the realms of the Achaemenids and Asoka to the empires of Mali and Songhay, and from ancient Rome and China to the Mughals, American settler colonialism, and the Soviet Union. Forty-five chapters detailing the history of individual empires are tied together by a set of global synthesizing surveys that structure the world history of empire into eight chronological phases.

The Apocalypse of Empire

Daniel's second half, however, offers an entirely different assessment of empire
and, as noted above, is thoroughly if not ... imperial overlords is paralleled by a
simultaneous battle taking place in the spiritual realm between the angelic forces
 ...

The Apocalypse of Empire

Author: Stephen J. Shoemaker

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 0812295250

Page: 272

View: 459

In The Apocalypse of Empire, Stephen J. Shoemaker argues that earliest Islam was a movement driven by urgent eschatological belief that focused on the conquest, or liberation, of the biblical Holy Land and situates this belief within a broader cultural environment of apocalyptic anticipation. Shoemaker looks to the Qur'an's fervent representation of the imminent end of the world and the importance Muhammad and his earliest followers placed on imperial expansion. Offering important contemporary context for the imperial eschatology that seems to have fueled the rise of Islam, he surveys the political eschatologies of early Byzantine Christianity, Judaism, and Sasanian Zoroastrianism at the advent of Islam and argues that they often relate imperial ambition to beliefs about the end of the world. Moreover, he contends, formative Islam's embrace of this broader religious trend of Mediterranean late antiquity provides invaluable evidence for understanding the beginnings of the religion at a time when sources are generally scarce and often highly problematic. Scholarship on apocalyptic literature in early Judaism and Christianity frequently maintains that the genre is decidedly anti-imperial in its very nature. While it may be that early Jewish apocalyptic literature frequently displays this tendency, Shoemaker demonstrates that this quality is not characteristic of apocalypticism at all times and in all places. In the late antique Mediterranean as in the European Middle Ages, apocalypticism was regularly associated with ideas of imperial expansion and triumph, which expected the culmination of history to arrive through the universal dominion of a divinely chosen world empire. This imperial apocalypticism not only affords an invaluable backdrop for understanding the rise of Islam but also reveals an important transition within the history of Western doctrine during late antiquity.

The Rise of the Russian Empire

some of the distractions and unhappinesses which radiated from the throne of the
apostles , while her very isolation in ... disregarding the lesson of the
disturbances which had followed the partition of the , realm between himself and
his half ...

The Rise of the Russian Empire

Author: Saki

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page: 334

View: 371

The Rise of the Russian Empire

some of the distractions and unhappinesses which radiated from the throne of the
apostles , while her very isolation in ... disregarding the lesson of the
disturbances which had followed the partition of the realm between himself and
his half ...

The Rise of the Russian Empire

Author: Hector H. Munro

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page: 334

View: 143

Citizenship between Empire and Nation

The breakthrough was in the realm of imagination as well: solving a conflict in a
colonial situation by treating it as an industrial relations issue, entailing
negotiations and contracts in familiar, metropolitan forms. Manual workers did not
obtain ...

Citizenship between Empire and Nation

Author: Frederick Cooper

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 0691171459

Page: 512

View: 336

As the French public debates its present diversity and its colonial past, few remember that between 1946 and 1960 the inhabitants of French colonies possessed the rights of French citizens. Moreover, they did not have to conform to the French civil code that regulated marriage and inheritance. One could, in principle, be a citizen and different too. Citizenship between Empire and Nation examines momentous changes in notions of citizenship, sovereignty, nation, state, and empire in a time of acute uncertainty about the future of a world that had earlier been divided into colonial empires. Frederick Cooper explains how African political leaders at the end of World War II strove to abolish the entrenched distinction between colonial "subject" and "citizen." They then used their new status to claim social, economic, and political equality with other French citizens, in the face of resistance from defenders of a colonial order. Africans balanced their quest for equality with a desire to express an African political personality. They hoped to combine a degree of autonomy with participation in a larger, Franco-African ensemble. French leaders, trying to hold on to a large French polity, debated how much autonomy and how much equality they could concede. Both sides looked to versions of federalism as alternatives to empire and the nation-state. The French government had to confront the high costs of an empire of citizens, while Africans could not agree with French leaders or among themselves on how to balance their contradictory imperatives. Cooper shows how both France and its former colonies backed into more "national" conceptions of the state than either had sought.

The Empire of Russia

He then entered Persia, and conquered the whole realm between the Oxus and
the Tigris. Bagdad, until now the proud capital of the caliphs, submitted to his
sway. Soon the whole region of Asia, from the Sea of Aral to the Persian Gulf, and
 ...

The Empire of Russia

Author: John Stevens Cabot Abbott

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page: 576

View: 917

Korea Between Empires 1895 1919

Unless a group explicitly entered this territorial realm from outside—as in the
case of Kija and his followers— the group was treated as descending from Tan'
gun and thus as part of the mining. This approach to Manchuria allowed Kim to
avoid ...

Korea Between Empires  1895 1919

Author: Andre Schmid

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231125390

Page: 372

View: 962

Turning from more traditional modes of historical inquiry, Korea Between Empires explores the formative influence of language and social discourse on conceptions of nationalism, national identity, and the nation-state.

History of the British Empire

517 among many intervening steps of progress , six memorable Statutes , which ,
standing prominently out , mark the ... except by the common council of the realm
; ” and that “ no freeman should be imprisoned except by the judgment of his ...

History of the British Empire

Author: William Francis Collier

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page: 531

View: 426

The War in the East

660 JOURNEY OF LI HUNG CHANG . fore gratifying to all friends of the empire to
learn that the vic . eroy had been ... the boundary of the Roman empire , and the
Roman empire extended to the Atlantic - two realms between the two oceans .

The War in the East

Author: Trumbull White

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page: 673

View: 954

The illustrated history of the British empire in India and the East to the suppression of the Sepoy mutiny in 1859 With a continuation by another author to the end of 1878

... Siamese officers , to hear tions which even the most thoughtless canand
determine all disputes arising between British ... situated anywhere within a
distance of twenty - four hours ' journey from the city of Bangkok , a realm
between . to be ...

The illustrated history of the British empire in India and the East     to the suppression of the Sepoy mutiny in 1859  With a continuation  by another author  to the end of 1878

Author: Edward Henry Nolan

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page:

View: 306

Phantom Empires

Hugo Schmidt considers that the " novella ' s poetic impact derives from a topic
that appears here for the first time in his writings and henceforth . . . the realm
between life and death . " 14 Both Robert Blauhut and Reinhard Lüth agree that
the ...

Phantom Empires

Author: Robert Dassanowsky

Publisher: Ariadne Press (CA)

ISBN:

Page: 223

View: 498

A former Austro-Hungarian officer and a nobleman, Alexander Lernet-Holenia (1897-1976) was a writer obsessed with the related concepts of postimperial Austrian national identity, Central European regionalism, and monarchism. Throughout most of his wide-ranging oeuvre, which includes novels, novellas, historical and biographical studies, short stories, essays, poetry, plays, and film scripts, he conveyed the image of an Austria inescapably haunted by the sociocultural elements of the lost Austro-Hungarian Empire. Reevaluation of Lernet-Holenia's work is overdue, because his fiction, previously understood only as imperial nostalgia, offers a significant representation of twentieth-century Austrian history from a conservative viewpoint. Using a sociopolitical approach, the present study analyzes the author's critical evaluations of post-imperial Austrian problems of national identity. Ten of Lernet-Holenia's works published between 1931 and 1969 - nine novels and one novella which deal specifically with Austrian society - are examined.