Slowly Down the Ganges

Told with Newby's self-deprecating humour and wry attention to detail, this is a classic of the genre and a window into an enchanting piece of history.

Slowly Down the Ganges

Author: Eric Newby

Publisher: HarperCollins UK

ISBN: 0007508212

Page: 400

View: 336

‘Slowly Down the Ganges’ is seen as a vintage Newby masterpiece, alongside ‘A Short Walk in the Hindu Kush’ and ‘Love and War in the Apennines’. Told with Newby's self-deprecating humour and wry attention to detail, this is a classic of the genre and a window into an enchanting piece of history.

The Ganges River

India Yesterday and Today. New York: Bantam Books, 1970. Newby, Eric. Slowly
Down the Ganges. Oakland, California: Lonely Planet Publications, 1998.
Nicholson, Jon. Ganges. London: BBC Books, 2007. Pavan, Aldo. The Ganges:
Along ...

The Ganges River

Author: Earle Rice

Publisher: Mitchell Lane Publishers, Inc.

ISBN: 1612283683

Page: 48

View: 288

The Ganges is India’s holiest river. But to millions of devoted Hindus, it is much more than just a river. It is also a goddess and a benevolent mother—Ganga Ma or Great Mother. To her devotees, bathing in “Mother Ganga” washes away all sin, drinking her waters heals all illness, and dying on her banks ensures deliverance from the cycle of death and rebirth. Or so they believe. Ganga Ma begins at the Gangotri Glacier in the Himalayas. Her waters plunge spectacularly out of the lofty mountains, meander lazily across India’s broad Gangetic Plain into Bangladesh, and finally spread out fan–like with a thousand watery fingers to empty into the Bay of Bengal. For more than 1,500 miles, the watery personification of the goddess Ganga sustains life in one of the world’s most densely populated regions, and charts a spiritual course to eternal contentment for most of India’s Hindu masses.

Caste Occupation and Politics on the Ganges

(Department of Tourism, Ministry of Tourism and Culture, Government of India,
New Delhi, October 2002). Consider, for example, Eric Newby's (1966)
fascinating account of travelling down the River Ganges, Slowly Down the
Ganges, which is ...

Caste  Occupation and Politics on the Ganges

Author: Assa Doron

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351953265

Page: 216

View: 928

This intriguing anthropological study investigates how the boatmen of Banaras have repositioned themselves within the traditional social organization and used their privileged position on the river to contest upper-caste and state domination. Assa Doron examines the evolution of the boatmen community, drawing on a variety of sources to illuminate the cultural politics of social and economic inequality in contemporary India. Caste, Occupation and Politics on the Ganges offers insight into recent debates about the cultural and historical forms of social practice and resistance at the juncture between tradition and the global economy, and will therefore appeal not only to anthropologists, but to anyone working in the field of development studies, globalization, religion, politics and cultural studies.

Five Emus to the King of Siam

nath Bandopadyaya's “The Goddess Who Came Down to Earth” acknowledges
the impossibility of writing about the Ganga “since much of the river exists more in
the imagination of the people [. ... 7 Newby, Slowly Down the Ganges, 193.

Five Emus to the King of Siam

Author: Helen Tiffin

Publisher: Rodopi

ISBN: 9042022434

Page: 260

View: 574

Western exploitation of other peoples is inseparable from attitudes and practices relating to other species and the extra-human environment generally. Colonial depredations turn on such terms as 'human', 'savage', 'civilised', 'natural', 'progressive', and on the legitimacies governing apprehension and control of space and landscape. Environmental impacts were reinforced, in patterns of unequal 'exchange', by the transport of animals, plants and peoples throughout the European empires, instigating widespread ecosystem change under unequal power regimes (a harbinger of today's 'globalization').This book considers these imperial 'exchanges' and charts some contemporary legacies of those inequitable imports and exports, transportations and transmutations. Sheep farming in Australia, transforming the land as it dispossessed the native inhabitants, became a symbol of (new, white) nationhood. The transportation of plants (and animals) into and across the Pacific, even where benign or nostalgic, had widespread environmental effects, despite the hopes of the acclimatisation societies involved, and, by extension, of missionary societies “planting the seeds of Christianity.” In the Caribbean, plantation slavery pushed back the “jungle” (itself an imported word) and erased the indigenous occupants – one example of the righteous, biblically justified cultivation of the wilderness. In Australia, artistic depictions of landscape, often driven by romantic and 'gothic' aesthetics, encoded contradictory settler mindsets, and literary representations of colonial Kenya mask the erasure of ecosystems. Chapters on the early twentieth century (in Canada, Kenya, and Queensland) indicate increased awareness of the value of species-preservation, conservation, and disease control. The tension between traditional and 'Euroscientific' attitudes towards conservation is revealed in attitudes towards control of the Ganges, while the urge to resource exploitation has produced critical disequilibrium in Papua New Guinea. Broader concerns centering on ecotourism and ecocriticism are treated in further essays summarising how the dominant West has alienated 'nature' from human beings through commodification in the service of capitalist 'progress'.

Graham s Magazine

Still flows the Ganges the mightiest of Eastern | beams , and the stars in the
shadowy distance , now waters ! ... is a plash , a feeble cry , a dark object floating
sparkling with the foam - fretting waves of the Ganges , slowly down the stream !

Graham s Magazine

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Rivers of the World

The pilgrim rests here and contemplates the work of Mother Ganga. See also
Hooghly, Yamuna Further Reading: Newby, Eric, Slowly down the Ganges: An
Enthralling and Hilarious Voyage down India's Sacred River, New York: Viking ...

Rivers of the World

Author: James R. Penn

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 1576070425

Page: 357

View: 637

Rivers of the World, vividly written and meticulously researched, is a rich and thorough treatment of some 200 of the world's rivers. * Organized in A-Z format, from the rivers Aare to Ziz * Each entry is prefaced with basic facts for the river covered, including river source, tributaries, outlet, and length * Each entry concludes with suggestions for further reading * Includes a full index and glossary of key terms

A Sense of Place

... Slowly Down the Ganges the sand was red-hot in the middle of the day. That
was very tricky. I dropped the stove in the river and we couldn't cook, so we had
to rely on cow dung. Eric: And there were lots of corpses that were semi-burned.

A Sense of Place

Author: Michael Shapiro

Publisher: Travelers' Tales

ISBN: 1932361812

Page: 312

View: 964

In A Sense of Place, journalist/travel writer Michael Shapiro goes on a pilgrimage to visit the world's great travel writers on their home turf to get their views on their careers, the writer's craft, and most importantly, why they chose to live where they do and what that place means to them. The book chronicles a young writer’s conversations with his heroes, writers he's read for years who inspired him both to pack his bags to travel and to pick up a pen and write. Michael skillfully coaxes a collective portrait through his interviews, allowing the authors to speak intimately about the writer's life, and how place influences their work and perceptions. In each chapter Michael sets the scene by describing the writer's surroundings, placing the reader squarely in the locale, whether it be Simon Winchester's Massachusetts, Redmond O'Hanlon's London, or Frances Mayes's Tuscany. He then lets the writer speak about life and the world, and through quiet probing draws out fascinating commentary from these remarkable people. For Michael it’s a dream come true, to meet his mentors; for readers, it's an engaging window onto the twin landscapes of great travel writers and the world in which they live.

Travelers Tales India

Sindhu! Kaveri! May you all be pleased to be manifest in these waters with which
I shall purify myself!) Prayer to the Seven Sacred Rivers recited by every devout
Hindu at the time of taking his bath N —Eric Newby, Slowly Down the Ganges ...

Travelers  Tales India

Author: James O'Reilly

Publisher: Travelers' Tales

ISBN: 1932361790

Page: 496

View: 222

India is among the most difficult—and most rewarding—of places to travel. Some have said India stands for "I’ll Never Do It Again." Many more are drawn back time after time because India is the best show on earth, the best bazaar of human experiences that can be visited in a lifetime. India dissolves ideas about what it means to be alive, and its people give new meaning to compassion, perseverance, ingenuity, and friendship. India—monsoon and marigold, dung and dust, colors and corpses, smoke and ash, snow and endless myth—is a cruel, unrelenting place of ineffable sweetness. Much like life itself. Journey to the Kumbh Mela in Allahabad, the world’s biggest party, with David Yeadon and take "A Bath for Fifteen Million People"; greet the monsoon with Alexancer Frater where the Indian and Pacific Oceans meet; track the endangered Indian One-Horned Rhinoceros through the jungles of Assam with Larry Habegger; encounter the anguish of the caste system with Steve Coll; discover the eternal power of the "monument of love," the Taj Mahal, with Jonah Blank; and much more.

Clean

Ganges water is also held to behave, taste, and look unusually 'clean' (Eric
Newby, Slowly Down the Ganges (London: Hodder & Stoughton, 1966), 212–18
and passim). Thanks to Dennis Herbstein for observations on contemporary ...

Clean

Author: Virginia Smith

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191579939

Page: 480

View: 730

Why do we still have nits? What exactly are 'purity rules'? And why have baths scarcely changed in 200 years? The long history of personal hygiene and purity is a fascinating subject that reveals how closely we are linked to our deeper past. In this pioneering book, Virginia Smith covers the global history of human body-care from the Neolithic to the present, using first-hand accounts and sources. From pre-historic grooming rituals to New Age medicine, from ascetics to cosmetics, Smith looks at how different cultures have interpreted and striven for personal cleanliness and shows how, throughout history, this striving for purity has brought great social benefits as well as great tragedies. It is probably safe to say that no-one who reads this book will look at his or her body (or bathroom) in quite the same way again.

The Contemporary Review

Thence we descended , and , embarking on the broad bosom of the Ganges ,
floated slowly down past the various ghauts or bathingplaces . These are
bordered with houses , some of them of almost palatial dimensions , and
connected with ...

The Contemporary Review

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Learning the Ropes

In this book, Newby looks back to his young self and his days on board "Moshulu."

Learning the Ropes

Author: Eric Newby

Publisher: John Murray Publishers

ISBN: 9780719556364

Page: 144

View: 407

From the perspective of 60 years on Eric Newby looks back with characteristic humour to his young self and his days on board 'Moshulu' and pays tribute, with his photographs, to these magnificent ships and their crews. No one with a love of the sea or a sense of the past could fail to be moved and excited by them.

The Ganges in Myth and History

Gradually the silt , carcied down from the Himalayas and along the Ganges
Valley , began building up the land , dividing the river again and again . Through
the ages the silt continued , and slowly the delta began to firm , filling out the 24 ...

The Ganges in Myth and History

Author: Steven G. Darian

Publisher: Motilal Banarsidass Publ.

ISBN: 9788120817579

Page: 219

View: 569

No river has kindled Man`s imagination like the Ganges. From its icy origins high in the Himalayas, this sacred river flows through the holy cities and the great plains of northern India to the Bay of Bengal. In a country where the red heat of summer inspires prayer for the coming monsoon, the life-giving waters of the Ganges have assumed legendary powers in the form of the Hindu goddess Ganga, the source of creation and abundance. Pilgrims flock to her shores to cleanse and purify themselves, to cure ailments, and to die that much closer to paradise. Steven Darian writes of the human experience and the legendary myths that surround the Ganges. While collecting material for this book, Dr. Darian lived by the Ganges, explored her shores, and was a pilgrim to the Ganga Sagar festival at Sagar Island off Calcutta where the sacred river and the ocean merge.

What the Traveller Saw

A collection of travel essays by a distinguished travel writer. Other books by Eric Newby include The Last Grain Race, Slowly Down the Ganges, Love and War in the Appennines and On the Shores of the Mediterranean.

What the Traveller Saw

Author: Eric Newby

Publisher: HarperPerennial

ISBN: 9780006545774

Page: 205

View: 744

A collection of travel essays by a distinguished travel writer. Other books by Eric Newby include The Last Grain Race, Slowly Down the Ganges, Love and War in the Appennines and On the Shores of the Mediterranean.

HMS Ganges Days

'The old schoolhouse is just down there.' He turned and nodded in the opposite
direction to a ... 'Better tell Spider we've arrived safe and sound,' said Jim as he
hoisted himself slowly to his feet. 'Good Effort Lads,' said Spider as he came out
of.

HMS Ganges Days

Author: Peter Broadbent

Publisher: Andrews UK Limited

ISBN: 1909183016

Page: 292

View: 786

When Peter Broadbent entered HMS Ganges, the toughest training establishment for young recruits to the Royal Navy, he was a naive 15-year-old Yorkshire schoolboy, entranced with the idea of seeing the world, proud of his drainpipe trousers and DA hairstyle, and eager to meet girls. In other words, he was a ‘Nozzer’ - a raw and unsuspecting recruit. When he emerged 386 days later it was as a prospective ‘Dabtoe’, not quite a fully trained Seaman, but well on the way. This funny and vivid memoir accurately captures what it was like to climb the mast, have your kit trashed, learn to swear, develop a taste for Kye and Stickies, double around the parade-ground at dead of night in your pyjamas, endlessly run up and down Laundry Hill ... and to do it all and much more while being continually barracked by a demanding Petty Officer Instructor. Along the way, Peter relished learning the Navy lingo and how to sail. He consumed platefuls of Cheese Ush, won a boxing certificate, discovered a secret stash of Playboy magazines, smoked thousands of cigarettes, and convinced girls back home that his shorn hair was in fact the very latest fashion ‘down south’.