Teaching Astronomy in Schools

Originally published in 1962, this book was designed as a classroom guide to teach school students the fundamental principals of astronomy.

Teaching Astronomy in Schools

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ISBN: 1316509796

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New Trends in Astronomy Teaching

A stimulating review of new trends in astronomy teaching - by experts in teaching astronomy at all levels, from around the world.

New Trends in Astronomy Teaching

Author: International Astronomical Union. Colloquium

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521623735

Page: 352

View: 569

How do students learn astronomy? How can the World-Wide Web be used to teach? And how do planetariums help with educating the public? These are just some of the timely questions addressed in this stimulating review of new trends in the teaching of astronomy. Based on an international meeting hosted by the University of London and the Open University (IAU Colloquium 162), this volume presents articles by experts from around the world. The proceedings of the first IAU Colloquium (105), The Teaching of Astronomy, edited by Percy and Pasachoff, were first published in 1990 and soon became established as the definitive resource for astronomy teachers. Astronomy education has advanced enormously in the intervening 7 years, and this sequel will inspire and encourage teachers of astronomy at all levels and provide them with wealth of ideas and experience on which to build.

Teaching and Learning Astronomy

The book concludes by addressing how the teaching and learning of astronomy can be improved worldwide. This valuable overview is based on papers and posters presented by experts at a Special Session of the International Astronomical Union.

Teaching and Learning Astronomy

Author: Jay Pasachoff

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521115391

Page: 284

View: 700

Astronomy is taught in schools worldwide, but few school teachers have any background in astronomy or astronomy teaching, and available resources may be insufficient or non-existent. This volume highlights the many places for astronomy in the curriculum ; relevant education research and "best practice"; strategies for pre-service and in-service teacher education ; the use of the Internet and other technologies ; and the role that planetariums, observatories, science centers, and organizations of professional and amateur astronomers can play. The special needs of developing countries, and other under-resourced areas, are also highlighted. The book concludes by addressing how the teaching and learning of astronomy can be improved worldwide. This valuable overview is based on papers and posters presented by experts at a Special Session of the International Astronomical Union.

Teaching astronomy in schools

Objections to astronomy, xi Observations, individual, 22 without telescope, 22
with telescope, junior, 27 with telescope, senior, 35 Observatories, school, 47
design of, 50 equipment of, 51 purpose of, 48, 51 site of, 5o supervision of, ...

Teaching astronomy in schools

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Research on Teaching Astronomy in the Planetarium

Since 1990, the planetarium education field has responded to momentum
changes in both the US educational system and an unprecedented availability in
off-the-shelf technology. Whereas the pre-1990s golden age of planetariums
could ...

Research on Teaching Astronomy in the Planetarium

Author: Timothy F. Slater

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 3319572024

Page: 131

View: 221

From a noted specialist in astronomy education and outreach, this Brief provides an overview of the most influential discipline-based science education research literature now guiding contemporary astronomy teaching. In recent years, systematic studies of effective and efficient teaching strategies have provided a solid foundation for enhancing college-level students’ learning in astronomy. Teaching astronomy and planetary science at the college-level was once best characterized as professor-centered, information-download lectures. Today, astronomy faculty are striving to drastically improve the learning environment by using innovative teaching approaches. Uniquely, the authors have organized this book around strands of commonly employed astronomy teaching strategies to help readers, professors, and scholars quickly access the most relevant work while, simultaneously, avoiding the highly specialized, technical vocabulary of constructivist educational pedagogies unfamiliar to most astronomy professors. For readers who are currently teaching astronomy at the college level—or those who plan on teaching at the college level in the future—this Brief provides an indispensable guide.

Great Ideas for Teaching Astronomy

Written and revised in response to requests from teachers for ideas that can be used to improve astronomy teaching, this new expanded edition offers dozens of ideas, demonstrations, and analogies gathered from over 40 teachers around the ...

Great Ideas for Teaching Astronomy

Author: Stephen M. Pompea

Publisher: Brooks/Cole Publishing Company

ISBN: 9780534373016

Page: 244

View: 514

Written and revised in response to requests from teachers for ideas that can be used to improve astronomy teaching, this new expanded edition offers dozens of ideas, demonstrations, and analogies gathered from over 40 teachers around the world.

Astronomy Communication

Another reason for attending the EAAE Summer School is to meet European
teachers who share the same interest in astronomy and also similar problems in
teaching the matter. Even if it is not possible to realize a more or less general ...

Astronomy Communication

Author: Andre Heck

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9401708010

Page: 226

View: 431

Astronomyhasalwaysbeenoneoftheeasiestofthesciencestoconveyto the public. That is partly because it produces spectacular pictures that can be explained (at least in part) and admired, partly because understanding of astronomy usually does not depend upon a knowledge of a complex cl- si?cation system or esoteric terminology, and partly because its extremes in distances and times challenge our imagination and philosophies. Most scientists enjoy sharing with others the discoveries made by th- selves and their colleagues. The primary purpose of scienti?c research is to discover, to learn, and to understand. When we succeed, we enjoy sh- ing that understanding. Education is most pleasurable when our audience wishes to learn and we have something important to convey. A?eldthatdoesnotcommunicatee?ectivelywiththepublicsoonlooses its interest and support. Author Andr ́ e Heck explains the many di?erent ways in which professional communication now occurs while Leslie Sage explains how such communication should be done. Astronomy done with spacecraft and large equipment is very expensive and the funds for those ultimately come from the public. The cost of astronomy prorated over the number of research astronomers is perhaps the highest in all the sciences. If astronomers do not share their results with the public, they will loose its support. However, for most astronomers the desire to share and educate dominates over the pragmatic need to win public support. With the advent of new communication techniques (television, videos, CDs, DVDs, animation, simulations) we have new methods to commu- cate, in addition to the conventional ones of the printed and spoken word.

Astronomy by Observation

This book has grown out of actual school - work , in which it was the teacher's
object to make pupils studying elementary astronomy observe and think . The
following are its chief peculiarities : 1. An efficient , easy , well - tried plan for
teaching ...

Astronomy by Observation

Author: Eliza A. Bowen

Publisher:

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Page: 94

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Information Handling in Astronomy

They can even contribute to astronomy education in the schools, through
programs such as the Astronomical Society of ... interest groups or "commissions"
IAU Commission 46 (Teaching of Astronomy - is responsible for astronomy
education.

Information Handling in Astronomy

Author: Andre Heck

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9780792364948

Page: 242

View: 747

This book offers a unique review of how astronomical information is handled, made available and tuned to various audiences, including education and public outreach. The information flow in astronomy is indeed illustrated from sources (cosmic objects) to end (mankind's knowledge). The experts contributing to this book have done their best to write in a way understandable to readers not necessarily hyperspecialized in astronomy, while providing specific detailed information as well as plenty of pointers and bibliographical elements. Especially enlightening are those `lessons learned' sections where authors make a critical review of the experience gained. This book will be read by researchers, teachers, editors, publishers, librarians, computer scientists, project managers, public relations officers, plus those in charge of astronomy-related institutions and associations, as well as all persons interested in the impact of mankind's understanding of the universe on society at large.

Uncovering Student Ideas in Astronomy

Prior to that he served as director of astronomy and physics education at the
University of California Lawrence Hall of Science. He has taught science at the
middle and high school levels in Maine, California, Costa Rica, and Micronesia.

Uncovering Student Ideas in Astronomy

Author: Page Keeley

Publisher: NSTA Press

ISBN: 1936137380

Page: 255

View: 850

What do your students know or think they know about what causes night and day, whether the Moon orbits the Earth, and why the Sun keeps glowing? Find out with this book on astronomy, the latest in NSTA s popular Uncovering Student Ideas in Science series. The 45 astronomy probes provide situations that will pique your students interest while helping you evaluate their understanding (or misunderstanding) of how the universe operates. The book is organised into four broad sections: the Earth and gravity; the Earth, Sun, and Moon system; the solar system and gravity in space; and stars, galaxies, and the universe. As the authors note, it s not always easy to help students untangle mistaken ideas. Using this powerful set of tools to identify students preconceptions is an excellent first step to helping your students achieve scientific understanding.

Astronomy Education Materials

LOWER SCHOOL LEVEL CURRICULUM MATERIAL * Teaching Astronomy in
Schools " E . Beet ( 1962 Cambridye Univ . Press ) 13 14 " Where is the Moon ? "
and. Abstraces and Indexes , Directories , Alamanacs and Yearbooks , Allas and
 ...

Astronomy Education Materials

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Page: 124

View: 478

Minutes of evidence appendices and analyses of evidence 1874 c 958

Schools . Workshops . Many Oxford science students become teachers in
schools ; Oxford students might be taught the principles of ... Further
accommodation is wanted at Oxford University Science . for teaching astronomy ,
3477 , 3478 .

Minutes of evidence  appendices  and analyses of evidence  1874  c 958

Author: Great Britain. Royal Commission on Scientific Instruction and the Advancement of Science

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Addresses and Proceedings National Education Association of the United States

To my thought , all the teaching in our public schools , while wholly unsectarian ,
is notably religious . Never let it be said that ... Some say our schools are "
godless , ” but we teach astronomy , and “ the undevout astronomer is mad . " We
teach ...

Addresses and Proceedings   National Education Association of the United States

Author: National Education Association of the United States

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Vols. for 1866-70 include Proceedings of the American Normal School Association; 1866-69 include Proceedings of the National Association of School Superintendents; 1870 includes Addresses and journal of proceedings of the Central College Association.

Text book of Popular Astronomy

This volume contains valuable and important information concerning school law,
which has never before been accessible to either teacher or school officer. A.
Armstrong, Supt. Schools, Sioux City, Iowa. Des Moines, May 15, 1880.

Text book of Popular Astronomy

Author: William Guy Peck

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page: 323

View: 740

Cyclopaedia of Education

A Dictionary of Information for the Use of Teachers, School Officers, Parents and
Others Henry Kiddle Alexander Jacob ... mensuration , astronomy , and other de-
tects , and physicians ; and brought the Arabi partments of natural science .

Cyclopaedia of Education

Author: Henry Kiddle

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page: 868

View: 387

Education Outlook

Many A revival of the observational astronomy of the ancients can be showy
emendations will otherwise probably distract attention , brought about by '
teaching astronomical geography in a scientific and be found , when too late , to
have left ...

Education Outlook

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Astronomy Education

Atkin , J . " Teaching Concepts of Modern Astronomy to Elementary - School
Children ” in Science Education , vol . 45 , p . 54 ( 1961 ) . Baxter , J . " Children ' s
Understanding of Familiar Astronomical Events ” in International Journal of
Science ...

Astronomy Education

Author: John R. Percy

Publisher: Astronomical Society of the pacific

ISBN:

Page: 316

View: 963

The Teaching of Astronomy

AN APPLICATION OF PERSONAL COMPUTERS IN ASTRONOMY EDUCATION
A . S . Nikolov University of Sofia , A . Ivanov Str . 5 , 1126 Sofia , Bulgaria
Observations play an important role in the process of teaching astronomical
knowledge ...

The Teaching of Astronomy

Author: Jay M. Pasachoff

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521353311

Page: 436

View: 312

This book stems from the proceedings of the International Astronomical Union Colloquium 105. Every facet of the teaching of astronomy is explored by the contributors. Courses, training and teaching techniques form a large sector of the book. Practical information on computers, textbooks and astronomical equipment is given, linking in with chapters on student projects and teaching techniques. The philosophical aspects and the history of astronomy are described in a chapter entitled astronomy and culture. Popularisation of astronomy is discussed including the role of planetariums and the contribution of amateur astronomers. This comprehensive and well illustrated book offers a unique overview of international teaching technology and expertise that will serve as a lasting guide to astronomers involved in education.