The Best Software Writing I

* Will appeal to the same (large) audience as Joel on Software * Contains exclusive commentary by Joel * Lots of free publicity both because of Joel’s influence in the community and the influence of the contributors

The Best Software Writing I

Author: Avram Joel Spolsky

Publisher: Apress

ISBN: 9781430200383

Page: 328

View: 263

* Will appeal to the same (large) audience as Joel on Software * Contains exclusive commentary by Joel * Lots of free publicity both because of Joel’s influence in the community and the influence of the contributors

Joel on Software

The Guerilla Guide to Interviewing Incentive Pay Considered Harmful Top Five (Wrong) Reasons You Don’t Have Testers Human Task Switches Considered Harmful Things You Should Never Do, Part One The Iceberg Secret, Revealed The Law of Leaky ...

Joel on Software

Author: Joel Spolsky

Publisher: Apress

ISBN: 1590593898

Page: 384

View: 101

Joel Spolsky began his legendary web log, www.joelonsoftware.com, in March 2000, in order to offer insights for improving the world of programming. Spolsky based these observations on years of personal experience. The result just a handful of years later? Spolsky's technical knowledge, caustic wit, and extraordinary writing skills have earned him status as a programming guru! His blog has become renowned throughout the programming worldnow linked to more than 600 websites and translated into over 30 languages. Joel on Software covers every conceivable aspect of software programming—from the best way to write code, to the best way to design an office in which to write code! All programmers, all people who want to enhance their knowledge of programmers, and all who are trying to manage programmers will surely relate to Joel's musings. Table of Contents Choosing a Language Back to Basics The Joel Test: 12 Steps to Better Code The Absolute Minimum Every Software Developer Absolutely, Positively Must Know About Unicode and Character Sets (No Excuses!) Painless Functional Specifications Part 1: Why Bother? Painless Functional Specifications Part 2: What’s a Spec? Painless Functional Specifications Part 3: But . . . How? Painless Functional Specifications Part 4: Tips Painless Software Schedules Daily Builds Are Your Friend Hard-Assed Bug Fixin’ Five Worlds Paper Prototyping Don’t Let Architecture Astronauts Scare You Fire and Motion Craftsmanship Three Wrong Ideas from Computer Science Biculturalism Get Crash Reports From Users—Automatically! The Guerilla Guide to Interviewing Incentive Pay Considered Harmful Top Five (Wrong) Reasons You Don’t Have Testers Human Task Switches Considered Harmful Things You Should Never Do, Part One The Iceberg Secret, Revealed The Law of Leaky Abstractions Lord Palmerston on Programming Measurement Rick Chapman Is In Search of Stupidity What Is the Work of Dogs in This Country? Getting Things Done When You’re Only a Grunt Two Stories Big Macs vs. The Naked Chef Nothing Is As Simple As It Seems In Defense of Not-Invented-Here Syndrome Strategy Letter I: Ben & Jerry’s vs. Amazon Strategy Letter II: Chicken-and-Egg Problems Strategy Letter III: Let Me Go Back! Strategy Letter IV: Bloatware and the 80/20 Myth Strategy Letter V: The Economics of Open Source A Week of Murphy’s Law Gone Wild How Microsoft Lost the API War Microsoft Goes Bonkers Our .NET Strategy Please Sir May I Have a Linker?

Telling Stories

A Short Path to Writing Better Software Requirements Ben Rinzler.
announcements, and the e‐mails, let alone the software requirements? There are
now far more people who can write good Java code working in technology than
can write a ...

Telling Stories

Author: Ben Rinzler

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 0470549203

Page: 160

View: 806

From System Designers to Top Management, Everyone loves a good story Once upon a time, it was well understood that stories teach better than plain facts. Why then are most software requirements documents a baffling hodge-podge of diagrams, data dictionaries, and bullet points, held together by little more than a name and a staple? Telling Stories teaches you to combine proven standards of requirements analysis with the most ancient and effective tool for sharing information, the narrative. Telling Stories simplifies and refines the classic methods of Structured Analysis, providing organization, design, and old-fashioned writing advice. Whether you?re just getting started or an experienced requirements writer, Telling Stories can help you turn dull, detailed material into an engaging, logical, and readable story, a story that can make the difference for your project and your career. Learn why readers believe and remember what they learn from stories Work with team members to gather content, tell their stories, and win their support Use stories to find every requirement Create diagrams that almost tell the story on their own (while looking clear and professional) Explain everything important about a process Use precise language to remove the ambiguity from requirements Write a forceful executive summary that stands on its own and sells a project to senior management Summarize often to keep the reader focused on key issues Structure the document so every part has a clear place and purpose

The Non Fiction Writer s Toolbox

The problem is that you get more than 5 billion search results. Who has the time to check out all the software listed on those websites? This book addresses this problem and will help you find the right program.

The Non Fiction Writer s Toolbox

Author: Sunny B. Lee

Publisher:

ISBN: 9781707438136

Page: 84

View: 738

Are you looking for a better tool than a word processor software to write your non-fiction book? If so, reading this book will save you time and money. Let's say you are googling "the best book-writing software." You're likely to get 10 million search results, and each page covers ten or more software. How do you decide if any of the software listed is the right one for you? The best thing to do would be to try each of them to find out, but who has the time to do that? Even reading the description of each program takes too much time. And the problem doesn't stop there. There are several categories of apps for each stage of the book writing process. I'm, of course, talking about software for finding book ideas, outlining, doing research, writing drafts, and so on. Looking for the best tool for each category takes up a lot of time and energy. But you want to spend that time and energy on writing your book rather than getting lost in the quest for the right tool. I wrote this book to address this difficulty and help you find the right program for you. I have been running a blog called "Book-Writing Software" ever since 2011. For the past nine years, I have tried and reviewed hundreds of book-writing apps. Even when I wasn't reviewing apps, I kept test-driving new programs that looked promising. This experience of constantly testing book-writing apps gave me an idea of which software is a useful tool and which one is just a passing fad. I narrowed down my experience into the top 20 programs. These programs are the best tool for each stage of the book writing process, such as: Finding promising book ideas Creating a coherent and effective outline Doing research and saving the results Writing a well-structured draft Removing distraction and overcoming the writer's block Working on the same draft on different devices to ensure writing on the go Editing the draft without spending money Publishing the book on Amazon This book is not meant to be a manual. However, I focused on the best feature of each software and provide a brief explanation of how to use the core features so that you can use the software right away. In a nutshell, by reading this book, you can check out the best software that is currently available for writing a non-fiction book.

Write Great Code Volume 3

Engineering Software, the third volume in the landmark Write Great Code series by Randall Hyde, helps you create readable and maintainable code that will generate awe from fellow programmers.

Write Great Code  Volume 3

Author: Randall Hyde

Publisher: No Starch Press

ISBN: 1593279817

Page: 376

View: 738

Engineering Software, the third volume in the landmark Write Great Code series by Randall Hyde, helps you create readable and maintainable code that will generate awe from fellow programmers. The field of software engineering may value team productivity over individual growth, but legendary computer scientist Randall Hyde wants to make promising programmers into masters of their craft. To that end, Engineering Software--the latest volume in Hyde's highly regarded Write Great Code series--offers his signature in-depth coverage of everything from development methodologies and strategic productivity to object-oriented design requirements and system documentation. You'll learn: • Why following the software craftsmanship model can lead you to do your best work • How to utilize traceability to enforce consistency within your documentation • The steps for creating your own UML requirements with use-case analysis • How to leverage the IEEE documentation standards to create better software This advanced apprenticeship in the skills, attitudes, and ethics of quality software development reveals the right way to apply engineering principles to programming. Hyde will teach you the rules, and show you when to break them. Along the way, he offers illuminating insights into best practices while empowering you to invent new ones. Brimming with resources and packed with examples, Engineering Software is your go-to guide for writing code that will set you apart from your peers.

The Best Business Writing 2012

That left Mr. Apotheker, who had lasted just seven months as chief executive of
the German software giant SAP. While reasonably well known in Europe and in
software circles, he was relatively unknown in Silicon Valley. As one executive
said ...

The Best Business Writing 2012

Author: Dean Starkman

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231504330

Page: 464

View: 574

An anthology Malcolm Gladwell has called "riveting and indispensable," The Best Business Writing is a far-ranging survey of business's dynamic relationship with politics, culture, and life. This year's selections include John Markoff (New York Times) on innovations in robot technology and the decline of the factory worker; Evgeny Morozov (New Republic) on the questionable value of the popular TED conference series and the idea industry behind it; Paul Kiel (ProPublica) on the ripple effects of the ongoing foreclosure crisis; and the infamous op-ed by Greg Smith, published in the New York Times, announcing his break with Goldman Sachs over its trading practices and corrupt corporate ethos. Jessica Pressler (New York) delves into the personal and professional rivalry between former spouses and fashion competitors Tory and Christopher Burch. Peter Whoriskey (Washington Post) exposes the human cost of promoting pharmaceuticals for off-label uses. Charles Duhigg and David Barboza (New York Times) investigate Apple's unethical labor practices in China. Max Abelson (Bloomberg) reports on Wall Street's amusing reaction to the diminishing annual bonus. Mina Kimes (Fortune) recounts the grisly story of a company's illegal testing—and misuse—of a medical device for profit, and Jeff Tietz (Rolling Stone) composes one of the most poignant and comprehensive portraits of the financial crisis's dissolution of the American middle class.

Software Portability

If one ignores portability considerations , telescopic generation is only of merit if I
really is a better software - writing language than anything else available . The
designer of L would have a natural tendency to believe this so . However , it is ...

Software Portability

Author: P. J. Brown

Publisher: CUP Archive

ISBN: 9780521297257

Page: 342

View: 698

The Best American Magazine Writing 2014

Apple Breaks the Mold: An Oral History With Jobs's death in 2011, Apple's
software problems only seemed to get worse. The release of a new version of
Apple Maps, which had nice visuals but had highly publicized problems directing
users to ...

The Best American Magazine Writing 2014

Author: Sid Holt

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231539517

Page: 512

View: 625

Our annual anthology of finalists and winners of the National Magazine Awards 2014 includes Max Chafkin's oral history of Apple from Fast Company, Joshua Davis's intimate portrait of tech pioneer John McAfee's personal and public breakdown from Wired; Kyle Dickman's haunting investigation into the preventable death of nineteen firemen battling an Arizona wildfire; and Ariel Levy's emotional account of extreme travel to a remote land—while pregnant—from The New Yorker. Other essays include Wright Thompson's bittersweet profile of Michael Jordan's fifty-something second act (ESPN the Magazine); Jean M. Twenge's revealing look at fertility myths and baby politics (The Atlantic); Janet Reitman's controversial study of the Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev (Rolling Stone); Luke Mogelson's harrowing experience accompanying asylum seekers on a potentially deadly sea voyage to Australia (New York Times Magazine); Lisa Miller's poignant report from Newtown, Connecticut, as the town tries to cope with the aftermath of one of the nation's worst mass shootings (New York); Emily Nussbaum's critiques of gender and politics on television (The New Yorker); and Witold Rybczynski's poetic engagement with modern architecture (Architect). The collection concludes with the award-winning poem "Elegies" by Kathleen Ossip (Poetry) and "The Embassy of Cambodia," a short story by Zadie Smith (The New Yorker).

Software Requirement Patterns

Unfortunately, there's no formulaic approach to the communication-intensive
challenge of understanding and specifying requirements. Stephen Withall's
Software Requirement Patterns can help any analyst write better requirements.

Software Requirement Patterns

Author: Stephen Withall

Publisher: Pearson Education

ISBN: 0735646066

Page: 384

View: 404

Learn proven, real-world techniques for specifying software requirements with this practical reference. It details 30 requirement “patterns” offering realistic examples for situation-specific guidance for building effective software requirements. Each pattern explains what a requirement needs to convey, offers potential questions to ask, points out potential pitfalls, suggests extra requirements, and other advice. This book also provides guidance on how to write other kinds of information that belong in a requirements specification, such as assumptions, a glossary, and document history and references, and how to structure a requirements specification. A disturbing proportion of computer systems are judged to be inadequate; many are not even delivered; more are late or over budget. Studies consistently show one of the single biggest causes is poorly defined requirements: not properly defining what a system is for and what it’s supposed to do. Even a modest contribution to improving requirements offers the prospect of saving businesses part of a large sum of wasted investment. This guide emphasizes this important requirement need—determining what a software system needs to do before spending time on development. Expertly written, this book details solutions that have worked in the past, with guidance for modifying patterns to fit individual needs—giving developers the valuable advice they need for building effective software requirements

Best Practices for the Formal Software Testing Process

tions developing software who haven't recognized this basic truth. We write a test
plan while requirements are being developed. We then do test design and write
test cases as the software design is being developed, and write test procedures ...

Best Practices for the Formal Software Testing Process

Author: Rodger Drabick

Publisher: Addison-Wesley

ISBN: 0133489329

Page: 312

View: 111

This is the digital version of the printed book (Copyright © 2004). Testing is not a phase. Software developers should not simply throw software over the wall to test engineers when the developers have finished coding. A coordinated program of peer reviews and testing not only supplements a good software development process, it supports it. A good testing life cycle begins during the requirements elucidation phase of software development, and concludes when the product is ready to install or ship following a successful system test. Nevertheless, there is no one true way to test software; the best one can hope for is to possess a formal testing process that fits the needs of the testers as well as those of the organization and its customers. A formal test plan is more than an early step in the software testing process—it's a vital part of your software development life cycle. This book presents a series of tasks to help you develop a formal testing process model, as well as the inputs and outputs associated with each task. These tasks include: review of program plans development of the formal test plan creation of test documentation (test design, test cases, test software, and test procedures) acquisition of automated testing tools test execution updating the test documentation tailoring the model for projects of all sizes Whether you are an experienced test engineer looking for ways to improve your testing process, a new test engineer hoping to learn how to perform a good testing process, a newly assigned test manager or team leader who needs to learn more about testing, or a process improvement leader, this book will help you maximize your effectiveness.

Plug In with onOne Software

In writing Plug In with onOne Software, however, I had to dig deep into every
crevice of Perfect Photo Suite 7 to ... My hope is that the Perfect Photo Suite,
along with this book, will encourage you to enjoy the process of experimenting
with your ...

Plug In with onOne Software

Author: Nicole S. Young

Publisher: Peachpit Press

ISBN: 0133094049

Page: 352

View: 281

With her friendly tone and insightful knowledge, Nicole S. Young takes readers through all the products in the onOne Photo Suite, walking through each and showing readers how to use the tools to stretch their creativity and showcase their personal photographic style. This beautifully illustrated guide provides easy-to-follow instructions on processing images from start to finish. Nicole will show readers how to use the following onOne tools to enhance their photos: Perfect Layers for a layered workflow without Photoshop: Perfect Portrait retouching; Perfect Mask for replacing backgrounds; Perfect Effects, Focal Point, and PhotoFrame for creative effects; and Perfect Resize for image enlargement. This step-based guide will show readers how to use these seven products together seamlessly as integrated modules also support their workflow - however they work. Readers can use Perfect Photo Suite directly from Photoshop, Lightroom, or Aperture - or as a standalone application.

Health Professionals Style Manual

Another program billed itself as “the best word processing add-on on the market.
It teaches you to write in the style of top authors and journalists.” “The best writer's
software suite on the market today. . . . [I]t is the most complete book-writing ...

Health Professionals Style Manual

Author: Shirley H. Fondiller, EdD, RN, FAAN

Publisher: Springer Publishing Company

ISBN: 9780826125057

Page: 152

View: 444

"This [book] is a guide to improving writing, with a major focus on demonstrating proper English grammar and compositionÖ.This is a must have reference to be kept at the writer's side." Score:100, 5 stars --Doody's Now you can learn and apply the basic principles of writing style, composition, grammar, word usage, and misusage, to the field of health care. With the Health Professionals Style Manual you will learn to improve your message and communicate more effectively. With up-to-date resources and references, these are just some of the rules and tools you will learn to use in your own writing: Style and Substance Art of Effective Writing Tips and Pitfalls Redundancies, Euphemisms, and Cliches Computers and the Internet Common Abbreviations and Acronyms Commonly Misspelled Words Using Prefixes and Suffixes Common Proofreader's Marks Electronic Resources If you're a researcher, student or professional specializing in the health related professions, this new, handy guide will help you improve your writing style and hone your grammar and word usage skills.

Computerworld

If you use an IBM S/34 you want the best quality software your money can buy.
Not software designed for some other hardware, but application software
designed specifically for the IBM System/34. Software written in RPGII and
flexible ...

Computerworld

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page: 108

View: 431

For more than 40 years, Computerworld has been the leading source of technology news and information for IT influencers worldwide. Computerworld's award-winning Web site (Computerworld.com), twice-monthly publication, focused conference series and custom research form the hub of the world's largest global IT media network.

Bioinformatics Software Engineering

Coding Style This chapter aims to help you write better code, whatever tools you
use to do so. I am sure that you write good code already, and equally certain that
when you learnt programming you were taught, as I was, the best way to go ...

Bioinformatics Software Engineering

Author: Paul Weston

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9780470857724

Page: 125

View: 981

Bioinformatics Software Engineering: Delivering Effective Applications will be useful to anyone who wants to understand how successful software can be developed in a rapidly changing environment. A handbook, not a textbook, it is not tied to any particular operating system, platform, language, or methodology. Instead it focuses on principles and practices that have been proven in the real world. It is pragmatic, emphasizing the importance of what the author calls Adaptive Programming - doing what works in your situation, and it is concise, covering the whole software development lifecycle in one slim volume. At each stage, it describes common pitfalls, explains how these can be avoided, and suggests simple techniques which make it easier to deliver better solutions. "Well thought-out ... addresses many of the key issues facing developers of bioinformatics software." (Simon Dear, Director, UK Technology and Development, Bioinformatics Engineering and Integration, Genetics Research, GlaxoSmithKline) Here are some examples from the book itself. On software development: “Writing software properly involves talking to people – often lots of people – and plenty of non-coding work on your part. It requires the ability to dream up new solutions to problems so complicated that they are hard to describe.” From description to specification: “Look for verbs – action words, such as ‘does’, ‘is’ and ‘views’. Identify nouns – naming words, like ‘user’, ‘home’ and ‘sequence’. List the adjectives – describing words, for example ‘quick’, ‘simple’ or ‘precise’. The verbs are the functions that must be provided by your application. The nouns define the parameters to those functions, and the adjectives specify the constraint conditions under which your program must operate.” On how to start writing software: “Handle errors. Take in data. Show output. Get going!” On testing: “It may not be physically possible to test every potential combination of situations that could occur as users interact with a program. But one thing that can be done is to test an application at the agreed extremes of its capability: the maximum number of simultaneous users it has to support, the minimum system configuration it must run on, the lowest communication speed it must cope with, and the most complex operations it must perform. If your program can cope with conditions at the edge of its performance envelope, it is less likely to encounter difficulties in dealing with less challenging situations.” On showing early versions of software to users: “It can be hard explaining the software development process to people who are unfamiliar with it. Code that to you is nearly finished is simply not working to them, and seeing their dream in bits on the workbench can be disappointing to customers, especially when they were expecting to be able to take it for a test drive.” On bugs: “If your users find a genuinely reproducible bug in production code, apologize, fix it fast, and then fix the system that allowed it through. And tell your customers what you are doing, and why, so they will be confident that it will not happen again. Everybody makes mistakes. Don’t make the same ones twice.” And one last thought on successful software development: "You have to be a detective, following up clues and examining evidence to discover what has gone wrong and why. And you have to be a politician, understanding what people want, both in public and in private, and how this is likely to affect what you are trying to do. This book cannot teach you how to do all of that, but it can help."

Writing Secure Code

Perfect software is an oxymoron, just like perfect security. (As is often said in the
security community, the most secure system is the one that's turned off and buried
in a concrete bunker, but even that is not perfect security.) We're talking about ...

Writing Secure Code

Author: David LeBlanc

Publisher: Pearson Education

ISBN: 0735637407

Page: 800

View: 936

Keep black-hat hackers at bay with the tips and techniques in this entertaining, eye-opening book! Developers will learn how to padlock their applications throughout the entire development process—from designing secure applications to writing robust code that can withstand repeated attacks to testing applications for security flaws. Easily digested chapters reveal proven principles, strategies, and coding techniques. The authors—two battle-scarred veterans who have solved some of the industry’s toughest security problems—provide sample code in several languages. This edition includes updated information about threat modeling, designing a security process, international issues, file-system issues, adding privacy to applications, and performing security code reviews. It also includes enhanced coverage of buffer overruns, Microsoft .NET security, and Microsoft ActiveX development, plus practical checklists for developers, testers, and program managers.

Creating a Software Engineering Culture

Karl Wiegers. Table 18.1. Relating Software Engineering Practices to
Organizational Goals. I The goal is to... Not to... I Understand the actual needs of
your customers Write a perfect, complete, and frozen software well enough to
minimize the ...

Creating a Software Engineering Culture

Author: Karl Wiegers

Publisher: Addison-Wesley

ISBN: 0133489299

Page: 384

View: 875

This is the digital version of the printed book (Copyright © 1996). Written in a remarkably clear style, Creating a Software Engineering Culture presents a comprehensive approach to improving the quality and effectiveness of the software development process. In twenty chapters spread over six parts, Wiegers promotes the tactical changes required to support process improvement and high-quality software development. Throughout the text, Wiegers identifies scores of culture builders and culture killers, and he offers a wealth of references to resources for the software engineer, including seminars, conferences, publications, videos, and on-line information. With case studies on process improvement and software metrics programs and an entire part on action planning (called “What to Do on Monday”), this practical book guides the reader in applying the concepts to real life. Topics include software culture concepts, team behaviors, the five dimensions of a software project, recognizing achievements, optimizing customer involvement, the project champion model, tools for sharing the vision, requirements traceability matrices, the capability maturity model, action planning, testing, inspections, metrics-based project estimation, the cost of quality, and much more! Principles from Part 1 Never let your boss or your customer talk you into doing a bad job. People need to feel the work they do is appreciated. Ongoing education is every team member’s responsibility. Customer involvement is the most critical factor in software quality. Your greatest challenge is sharing the vision of the final product with the customer. Continual improvement of your software development process is both possible and essential. Written software development procedures can help build a shared culture of best practices. Quality is the top priority; long-term productivity is a natural consequence of high quality. Strive to have a peer, rather than a customer, find a defect. A key to software quality is to iterate many times on all development steps except coding: Do this once. Managing bug reports and change requests is essential to controlling quality and maintenance. If you measure what you do, you can learn to do it better. You can’t change everything at once. Identify those changes that will yield the greatest benefits, and begin to implement them next Monday. Do what makes sense; don’t resort to dogma.

How Google Tests Software

Writing a foreword for a book you wish you had written yourself is a dubious
honor; it's a bit like serving as best man for a friend who is about to spend the rest
of his life with the girl you wanted to marry. But ]ames Whittaker is a cunning guy.

How Google Tests Software

Author: James A. Whittaker

Publisher: Addison-Wesley Professional

ISBN: 0321803027

Page: 281

View: 881

Describes the techniques Google uses to test their software, and offers similiar techniques for analyzing risk and planning tests, allowing an Internet company to become more productive.

HBR Guide to Better Business Writing HBR Guide Series

NOT THIS: BUT THIS: Sarah— It was hard making headway with Jim Martinez,
but finally we're looking (in the best-case scenario) at a demonstration of what
our software can do by mid-May, as I established in my first telephone conference
 ...

HBR Guide to Better Business Writing  HBR Guide Series

Author: Bryan A. Garner

Publisher: Harvard Business Review Press

ISBN: 1422184048

Page: 208

View: 205

DON'T LET YOUR WRITING HOLD YOU BACK. When you’re fumbling for words and pressed for time, you might be tempted to dismiss good business writing as a luxury. But it’s a skill you must cultivate to succeed: You’ll lose time, money, and influence if your e-mails, proposals, and other important documents fail to win people over. The HBR Guide to Better Business Writing, by writing expert Bryan A. Garner, gives you the tools you need to express your ideas clearly and persuasively so clients, colleagues, stakeholders, and partners will get behind them. This book will help you: • Push past writer’s block • Grab—and keep—readers’ attention • Earn credibility with tough audiences • Trim the fat from your writing • Strike the right tone • Brush up on grammar, punctuation, and usage

The Business of Software

Acknowledgments The idea for this book goes back to 1997 , when I first put
together a course on “ The Software ... I began writing in mid - December 2001 ,
starting with the strategy chapter . ... Many people helped me write a better book .

The Business of Software

Author: Michael A. Cusumano

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9780743215800

Page: 334

View: 959

The co-author of Microsoft Secrets links issues related to strategy and organization to those of managing technology, arguing that companies must chose a business model that will capitalize on good times and survive more difficult periods, and presenting the success stories of such companies as IBM, Toshiba, and Motorola. 25,000 first printing.

Coders at Work

Obviously it's a lot faster and lot more powerful but your brain is a million times
more powerful than the best software tools. I can write programs and then
suddenly, days later, say, “There's a mistake in that program—if this happens and
that ...

Coders at Work

Author: Peter Seibel

Publisher: Apress

ISBN: 1430219491

Page: 632

View: 131

Peter Seibel interviews 15 of the most interesting computer programmers alive today in Coders at Work, offering a companion volume to Apress’s highly acclaimed best-seller Founders at Work by Jessica Livingston. As the words “at work” suggest, Peter Seibel focuses on how his interviewees tackle the day-to-day work of programming, while revealing much more, like how they became great programmers, how they recognize programming talent in others, and what kinds of problems they find most interesting. Hundreds of people have suggested names of programmers to interview on the Coders at Work web site: www.codersatwork.com. The complete list was 284 names. Having digested everyone’s feedback, we selected 15 folks who’ve been kind enough to agree to be interviewed: Frances Allen: Pioneer in optimizing compilers, first woman to win the Turing Award (2006) and first female IBM fellow Joe Armstrong: Inventor of Erlang Joshua Bloch: Author of the Java collections framework, now at Google Bernie Cosell: One of the main software guys behind the original ARPANET IMPs and a master debugger Douglas Crockford: JSON founder, JavaScript architect at Yahoo! L. Peter Deutsch: Author of Ghostscript, implementer of Smalltalk-80 at Xerox PARC and Lisp 1.5 on PDP-1 Brendan Eich: Inventor of JavaScript, CTO of the Mozilla Corporation Brad Fitzpatrick: Writer of LiveJournal, OpenID, memcached, and Perlbal Dan Ingalls: Smalltalk implementor and designer Simon Peyton Jones: Coinventor of Haskell and lead designer of Glasgow Haskell Compiler Donald Knuth: Author of The Art of Computer Programming and creator of TeX Peter Norvig: Director of Research at Google and author of the standard text on AI Guy Steele: Coinventor of Scheme and part of the Common Lisp Gang of Five, currently working on Fortress Ken Thompson: Inventor of UNIX Jamie Zawinski: Author of XEmacs and early Netscape/Mozilla hacker