The Bioarchaeology of Social Control

societies to help maintain a “natural” social order. However, as societies become
more stratified, with increased inequality, formal social control is required to
ensure the harmony continues (Ross 1901:96). The problem with social control is
 ...

The Bioarchaeology of Social Control

Author: Ryan P. Harrod

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 3319595164

Page: 172

View: 162

Taking a bioarchaeological approach, this book examines the Ancestral Pueblo culture living in the Four Corners region of the United States during the late Pueblo I through the end of the Pueblo III period (AD 850-1300). During this time, a vast system of pueblo villages spread throughout the region creating what has been called the Chaco Phenomenon, named after the large great houses in Chaco Canyon that are thought to have been centers of control. Through a bioarchaeological analysis of the human skeletal remains, this volume provides evidence that key individuals within the hierarchical social structure used a variety of methods of social control, including structural violence, to maintain their power over the interconnected communities.

The Routledge Handbook of the Bioarchaeology of Human Conflict

In her contribution, Tung specifically addresses the social norms governing the
treatment of women through traumatic ... with evidence of healing, but became
more deadly, as they did for men, in the period that saw the demise of state
control.

The Routledge Handbook of the Bioarchaeology of Human Conflict

Author: Christopher Knüsel

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134677979

Page: 706

View: 752

If human burials were our only window onto the past, what story would they tell? Skeletal injuries constitute the most direct and unambiguous evidence for violence in the past. Whereas weapons or defenses may simply be statements of prestige or status and written sources are characteristically biased and incomplete, human remains offer clear and unequivocal evidence of physical aggression reaching as far back as we have burials to examine. Warfare is often described as ‘senseless’ and as having no place in society. Consequently, its place in social relations and societal change remains obscure. The studies in The Routledge Handbook of the Bioarchaeology of Human Conflict present an overview of the nature and development of human conflict from prehistory to recent times as evidenced by the remains of past people themselves in order to explore the social contexts in which such injuries were inflicted. A broadly chronological approach is taken from prehistory through to recent conflicts, however this book is not simply a catalogue of injuries illustrating weapon development or a narrative detailing ‘progress’ in warfare but rather provides a framework in which to explore both continuity and change based on a range of important themes which hold continuing relevance throughout human development.

Animas La Plata Project Bioarchaeology

Antemortem rib fractures tend to be associated with trauma complexes and lead
to serious medical problems . At least some of the perimortem trauma indicated in
the 5LP245 PHR assemblage was likely related to gaining social control over ...

Animas La Plata Project  Bioarchaeology

Author: Elizabeth M. Perry

Publisher: Swca Incorporated

ISBN:

Page: 463

View: 473

Volume XV of the Animas-La Plata series (SWCA Anthropological Research Paper No. 10) contains thirteen chapters and multiple appendixes by a multitude of authors. The introductory chapter presents the broad archaeological context of the ALP project, explains some of the terminology used in writing about the ALP skeletal remains, and briefly characterizes the nature of the assemblage with respect to basic demographics such as the age and sex distribution of the human remains recovered from the different ALP sites. The NAGPRA process through the several stages of this long-term project is described, as is its influence on data collection. The remainder of the volume presents the results of bioarchaeological data collection and analysis conducted by different analysts who address mortuary practice, paleodemography, skeletal and dental morphology, health indicators in adults and children, biological variation, and ethnicity of the basin's Pueblo I residents. The final two chapters document the methods employed in the processed human remains (PHR) analysis from Sacred Ridge, and present the results of a first analysis of these data.

Man Corn

Social Control and Social Pathology SHANE A. BAKER ( 1990 ) suggested that
Anasazi cannibalism might have been used as ... for the evolution of perimortem
body processing , something we have not yet recognized in the
bioarchaeological ...

Man Corn

Author: Christy G. Turner

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page: 547

View: 420

Using detailed osteological analyses and other lines of evidence, this study of prehistoric violence, homicide, and cannibalism explodes the myth that the Anasazi and other Southwest Indians were simple, peaceful farmers.

Purposeful Pain

The Bioarchaeology of Intentional Suffering Susan Guise Sheridan, Lesley A.
Gregoricka ... Individuals who attempted escape were acting against the system
of social and physical control under which they had been imprisoned. When
caught ...

Purposeful Pain

Author: Susan Guise Sheridan

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN: 3030321819

Page: 271

View: 389

Pain is an evolutionary and adaptive mechanism to prevent harm to an individual. Beyond this, how it is defined, expressed, and borne is dictated culturally. Thus, the study of pain requires a holistic approach crossing cultures, disciplines, and time. This volume explores how and why pain-inducing behaviors are selected, including their potential to demonstrate individuality, navigate social hierarchies, and express commitment to an ideal. It also explores how power dynamics affect individual choice, at times requiring self-induced suffering. Taking bioanthropological and bioarchaeological approaches, this volume focuses on those who purposefully seek pain to show that, while often viewed as “exotic,” the pervasiveness of pain-inducing practices is more normative than expected. Theory and practice are employed to re-conceptualize pain as a strategic path towards achieving broader individual and societal goals. Past and present motivations for self-inflicted pain, its socio-political repercussions, and the physical manifestations of repetitive or long-term pain inducing behaviors are examined. Chapters span geographic and temporal boundaries and a wide variety of activities to illustrate how purposeful pain is used by individuals for personal expression and manipulated by political powers to maintain the status quo. This volume reveals how bioarchaeology illuminates paleopathology, how social theory enhances bioarchaeology, and how ethnography benefits from a longer temporal perspective.

Social Bioarchaeology

Archaeologists and bioarchaeologists did not seek educational training within
increasingly prevalent African American ... academic productions as mechanisms
for social control and reproduction of “white privilege” within academic settings ...

Social Bioarchaeology

Author: Sabrina C. Agarwal

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781444390520

Page: 496

View: 130

Illustrates new methodological directions in analyzing human social and biological variation Offers a wide array of research on past populations around the globe Explains the central features of bioarchaeological research by key researchers and established experts around the world

The Bioarchaeology of Socio Sexual Lives

American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 126(4), 377–390. ...
Bioarchaeological inferences from a Neolithic ossuary from Alepotrypa Cave,
Diros, Greece. International ... The origins of human sexual culture: Sex, gender
and social control.

The Bioarchaeology of Socio Sexual Lives

Author: Pamela L. Geller

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 3319409956

Page: 232

View: 736

This volume uses bioarchaeological remains to examine the complexities and diversity of past socio-sexual lives. This book does not begin with the presumption that certain aspects of sex, gender, and sexuality are universal and longstanding. Rather, the case studies within—extend from Neolithic Europe to pre-Columbian Mesoamerica to the nineteenth-century United States—highlight the importance of culturally and historically contextualizing socio-sexual beliefs and practices. The Bioarchaeology of Socio-Sexual Lives highlights a major shortcoming in many scholarly and popular presentations of past socio-sexual lives. They reveal little about the ancient or historic group under study and much about Western society’s modern state of heteronormative affairs. To interrogate commonsensical thinking about socio-sexual identities and interactions, this volume draws from critical feminist and queer studies. Reciprocally, bioarchaeological studies extend social theorizing about sex, gender, and sexuality that emphasizes the modern, conceptual, and discursive. Ultimately, The Bioarchaeology of Socio-Sexual Lives invites readers to think more deeply about humanity’s diversity, the naturalization of culture, and the past’s presentation in mass-media communications.

Bioarchaeology of Climate Change and Violence

Social. Control. and. Violence. in. the. US. Southwest. 4.1 The Role of Climate
Change in the US Southwest The US Southwest (primarily Utah, Colorado,
Arizona, and New Mexico) is arguably a region defined by marginality for human
 ...

Bioarchaeology of Climate Change and Violence

Author: Ryan P. Harrod

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 1461492394

Page: 75

View: 447

The goal of this monograph is to emphasize with empirical data the complexity of the relationship between climate change and violence. Bioarchaeology is the integration of human skeletal remains from ancient societies with the cultural and environmental context. Information on mortality, disease, diet and other factors provide important data to examine long chronologies of human existence, particularly during periods of droughts and life-threatening climate changes. Case studies are used to reconstruct the responses and short and long-term adaptations made by groups before, during and after dramatic changes in weather and climate. Interpersonal and group violence is also analyzed. The authors find that while in some cases there is an increase in trauma and violence, in other cases there is not. Human groups are capable of avoiding violent altercations and increasing broad networks of cooperation that help to mitigate the effects of climate change. A case study from the U.S. Southwest is provided that shows the variable and surprising ways that ancient farmers in the past dealt with long term droughts.

The Archaeology of Slavery

Bioarchaeological research on the effects of systems of social control can
offerinsight into the lived experiences and biological well-being of enslaved and
captive individuals. The value of the four case studies presented in this chapter is
that ...

The Archaeology of Slavery

Author: Lydia Wilson Marshall

Publisher: SIU Press

ISBN: 080933397X

Page: 414

View: 794

The Archaeology of Slavery grapples with both the benefits and complications of a comparative approach to the archaeology of slavery. Contributors from different archaeological subfields, including American, African, prehistoric, and historical, consider how to define slavery, identify it in the archaeological record, and study slavery as a diachronic process that covers enslavement to emancipation and beyond. Themes include how to define slavery, how to identify slavery archaeologically, enslavement and emancipation, and the politics and ethics of slavery-related research.

Choice

Social. &. Behavioral. Sciences. insightful. ethnography. of. four. Maya. townships
. in. the. Guatemalan. highlands begins with the ... even opposites such as social
control versus personal freedom , biological life or death , and to display conceal
, attract / repulse , familiarize / alienate . ... The papers serve to exemplify the
compelling skeletal biological questions addressed in bioarchaeology in Greece
 ...

Choice

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

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View: 523

Guide

... Head ) Organizational theory , work and occupations , criminology , deviance
and social control , research methods ... of Queensland , St Lucia 2001 ; Assoc
Prof ) Forensics , Bioarchaeology , ancient DNA , Paleomicrobiology ; Middle
East ...

Guide

Author: American Anthropological Association

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page:

View: 614

The Materiality of Death

Chapter 2 More than Metaphor : Approaching the Human Cadaver in
Archaeology Liv Nilsson Stutz ABSTRACT ... In this transition , the unity of the
mindful body and the embodied mind breaks down , and cultural and social
control over the ...

The Materiality of Death

Author: European Association of Archaeologists. Meeting

Publisher: British Archaeological Reports Limited

ISBN:

Page: 160

View: 437

16 papers presented from an EAA session held at Krakow in 2006, exploring various aspects of the archaeology of death. Contents: Chapter 1. The Materiality of Death: Bodies, Burials, Beliefs (Fredrik Fahlander & Terje Oestigaard); Chapter 2. More than Metaphor: Approaching the Human Cadaver in Archaeology (Liv Nilsson Stutz); Chapter 3. A Piece of the Mesolithic. Horizontal Stratigraphy and Bodily Manipulations at Skateholm (Fredrik Fahlander); Chapter 4. Excavating the KingsAe Bones: The Materiality of Death in Practice and Ethics Today 9Anders Kaliff & Terje Oestigaard); Chapter 5. From Corpse to Ancestor: The Role of Tombside Dining in the Transformation of the Body in Ancient Rome (Regina Gee); Chapter 6. Cremations, Conjecture and Contextual Taphonomies: Material Strategies during the 4th to 2nd Millennia BC in Scotland (Paul R J Duffy and Gavin MacGregor); Chapter 7. Ritual and Remembrance at Archaic Crustumerium. The Transformations of Past and Modern Materialities in the Cemetery of Cisterna Grande (Rome, Italy) (Ulla Rajala); Chapter 8. Reuse in Finnish Cremation Cemeteries under Level Ground - Examples of Collective Memory (Anna Wickholm); Chapter 9. Life and Death in the Bronze Age of the NW of Iberian Peninsula (Ana M. S. Bettencourt); Chapter 10. Norwegian Face-Urns: Local Context and Interregional Contacts (Malin Aasbe); Chapter 11. The Use of Ochre in Stone Age Burials of the East Baltic (Ilga Zagorska); Chapter 12. oDeath Mythso: Performing of Rituals and Variation in Corpse Treatment during the Migration Period in Norway (Siv Kristoffersen and Terje Oestigaard); Chapter 13. Reproduction and Relocation of Death in Iron Age Scandinavia (Terje Gansum); Chapter 14. A Road for the VikingAes Soul (Ake Johansson); Chapter 15. A Road to the Other Side (Camilla Gr); Chapter 16. Stones and Bones: The Myth of Ymer and Mortuary Practises with an Example from the Migration Period in Uppland, Central Sweden (Christina Lindgren).

The Archaeological Journal

... is re - iterate the divide between an ecological approach to early prehistory and
a socially controlled later prehistory . ... If we are going to tackle these big
questions in archaeology , as we must , then I do feel that more attention needs to
be ...

The Archaeological Journal

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page:

View: 951

Arkansas Archeological Survey Research Series

Burnett's bioarcheological analysis gives a clear indication that the individuals
interred at Hardman were engaged in one ... a certain degree of social control
and management and have resulted in archeological evidence of long distance
trade ...

Arkansas Archeological Survey Research Series

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page:

View: 739

Annual Review of Anthropology

Similar issues were raised for African archaeology ( Andah 1995 ) . The ability to
define another people has been a major means and measure of social control ,
with or without archaeology . It is against such disempowerment that diasporan ...

Annual Review of Anthropology

Author: William H. Durham

Publisher:

ISBN: 9780824319304

Page: 550

View: 429