The Chreia and Ancient Rhetoric

This volume features thirty-six translated texts illustrating the use of the chreia, or anecdote, in Greco-Roman classrooms to teach reading, writing, and composition.

The Chreia and Ancient Rhetoric

Author: Ronald F. Hock

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004126565

Page: 411

View: 284

This volume features thirty-six translated texts illustrating the use of the chreia, or anecdote, in Greco-Roman classrooms to teach reading, writing, and composition. This ancient literary form preserves the wit and wisdom of famous philosophers, orators, kings, and poets. Paperback edition is available from the Society of Biblical Literature (www.sbl-site.org).

The Chreia and Ancient Rhetoric

This book provides the first translations in English and a preliminary analysis of the commentaries on the chreia chapter in Aphthonius’s standard Progymnasmata, a classroom guide on composition.

The Chreia and Ancient Rhetoric

Author: Ronald F. Hock

Publisher: SBL Press

ISBN: 9781589836440

Page: 345

View: 410

This book provides the first translations in English and a preliminary analysis of the commentaries on the chreia chapter in Aphthonius’s standard Progymnasmata, a classroom guide on composition. The chreia, or anecdote, was a popular form that preserved the wisdom of philosophers, kings, generals, and sophists. Aphthonius used the chreia to provide instructions on how to construct an argument and to confirm the validity of the chreia by means of an eight-paragraph essay. His treatment of this classroom exercise, however, was so brief that commentators needed to clarify, explain, and supplement what he had written as well as to situate the chreia as preparation for the study of rhetoric—the kinds of public speeches and the parts of a speech. By means of these Byzantine commentaries, we can thus see more clearly how this important form and its confirmation were taught in classrooms for over a thousand years.

The Chreia and Ancient Rhetoric

This book provides the first translations in English and a preliminary analysis of the commentaries on the chreia chapter in Aphthonius’s standard Progymnasmata, a classroom guide on composition.

The Chreia and Ancient Rhetoric

Author: Ronald F. Hock

Publisher: Society of Biblical Lit

ISBN: 1589836456

Page: 345

View: 693

This book provides the first translations in English and a preliminary analysis of the commentaries on the chreia chapter in Aphthonius’s standard Progymnasmata, a classroom guide on composition. The chreia, or anecdote, was a popular form that preserved the wisdom of philosophers, kings, generals, and sophists. Aphthonius used the chreia to provide instructions on how to construct an argument and to confirm the validity of the chreia by means of an eight-paragraph essay. His treatment of this classroom exercise, however, was so brief that commentators needed to clarify, explain, and supplement what he had written as well as to situate the chreia as preparation for the study of rhetoric—the kinds of public speeches and the parts of a speech. By means of these Byzantine commentaries, we can thus see more clearly how this important form and its confirmation were taught in classrooms for over a thousand years.

Ancient Rhetoric and the Synoptic Problem

In the end, this work illustrates that hypotheses of Markan priority, like the Farrer Hypothesis and Two-Document Hypothesis, are more rhetorically plausible than hypotheses of Matthean priority.

Ancient Rhetoric and the Synoptic Problem

Author: Alex Damm

Publisher: Peeters Pub & Booksellers

ISBN: 9789042926998

Page: 396

View: 242

Only recently have studies of the synoptic problem begun to ground their assessments of literary dependence in ancient literary conventions. In an effort to appreciate more fully the evangelists' modus operandi, this study examines their appeal to Greco-Roman rhetoric, the "science of speaking well". Focusing on a rhetorical form called the chreia, the book examines rhetorical techniques and reasons for chreia adaptation, particularly reasons why authors changed this form, both in theory and in the practice of the Hellenistic authors Plutarch and Josephus. With these reasons in mind, the study assesses literary dependence among the synoptic gospels, examining in detail a Triple Tradition and Double Tradition _chreia_. In the end, this work illustrates that hypotheses of Markan priority, like the Farrer Hypothesis and Two-Document Hypothesis, are more rhetorically plausible than hypotheses of Matthean priority. While Matthew and Luke's adaptations of Mark tend to reflect the rhetorical reasoning that we should expect, Mark's reasoning is often problematic, for Mark repeatedly works against the fundamental rhetorical principles of clarity and propriety.

Ekphrasis Imagination and Persuasion in Ancient Rhetorical Theory and Practice

The rhetorical skills they taught were the badge of the adult educated male.12
While some exercises, like the chreia (a discussion of a saying attributed to some
famous figure such as Diogenes the Cynic) might include grammatical exercises
 ...

Ekphrasis  Imagination and Persuasion in Ancient Rhetorical Theory and Practice

Author: Ruth Webb

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317145364

Page: 252

View: 222

This is a study of ekphrasis, the art of making listeners and readers 'see' in their imagination through words alone, as taught in ancient rhetorical schools and as used by Greek writers of the Imperial period (2nd-6th centuries CE). The author places the practice of ekphrasis within its cultural context, emphasizing the importance of the visual imagination in ancient responses to rhetoric, poetry and historiography. By linking the theoretical writings on ekphrasis with ancient theories of imagination, emotion and language, she brings out the persuasive and emotive function of vivid language in the literature of the period. This study also addresses the contrast between the ancient and the modern definitions of the term ekphrasis, underlining the different concepts of language, literature and reader response that distinguish the ancient from the modern approach. In order to explain the ancient understanding of ekphrasis and its place within the larger system of rhetorical training, the study includes a full analysis of the ancient technical sources (rhetorical handbooks, commentaries) which aims to make these accessible to non-specialists. The concluding chapter moves away from rhetorical theory to consider the problems and challenges involved in 'turning listeners into spectators' with a particular focus on the role of ekphrasis within ancient fiction. Attention is also paid to texts that lie at the intersection of the modern and ancient definitions of ekphrasis, such as Philostratos' Imagines and the many ekphraseis of buildings and monuments to be found in Late Antique literature.

Rhetoric Ethic and Moral Persuasion in Biblical Discourse

The saying is a verbal chreia, and like many other chreiai the meaning is not
immediately evident. ... Chreia 44 in Ronald F. Hock and Edward N. O'Neil, eds.,
The Chreia in Ancient Rhetoric:1, The Progymnasmata (Atlanta: Scholars Press,
 ...

Rhetoric  Ethic  and Moral Persuasion in Biblical Discourse

Author: Thomas H. Olbricht

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 9780567028112

Page: 401

View: 588

A collection of essays from the Heidelberg conference on rhetoric and the New Testament.

Progymnasmata

This volume provides an English translation of four Greek treatises written during the time of the Roman empire and attributed to Theon, Hermogenes, Aphthonius, and Nicolaus. Several of these works are translated here for the first time.

Progymnasmata

Author: George Alexander Kennedy

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004127234

Page: 231

View: 486

This volume provides an English translation of four Greek treatises written during the time of the Roman empire and attributed to Theon, Hermogenes, Aphthonius, and Nicolaus. Several of these works are translated here for the first time. Paperback edition available from the Society of Biblical Literature (www.sbl-site.org).

Jesus Rhetoric and Law

This book uses Greco-Roman theories and practice of gnomic speech to elaborate a rhetorical-critical model of the interaction of memory, performance and composition in the public discourse of Jesus and of both his oral and gospel-writing ...

Jesus  Rhetoric and Law

Author: Ian H. Henderson

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004103771

Page: 437

View: 230

This book uses Greco-Roman theories and practice of gnomic speech to elaborate a rhetorical-critical model of the interaction of memory, performance and composition in the public discourse of Jesus and of both his oral and gospel-writing interpreters.

Stories with Intent

In ancient rhetoric one of the steps in elaborating a chreia (a witty or wise saying
from a famous person) was analogy (ek tou paraboles [sic]). See The Chreia and
Ancient Rhetoric: Classroom Exercises (trans. and ed. Ronald F. Hock and ...

Stories with Intent

Author: Klyne Snodgrass

Publisher: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing

ISBN: 0802842410

Page: 846

View: 805

Stories with Intent offers pastors and students an accessible and comprehensive guide to Jesus' parables. Klyne Snodgrass explores in vivid detail the context in which these stories were told, the purpose they had in Jesus' message, and the ways they have been interpreted by the church and modern scholarship. While holding a consciously evangelical approach, Snodgrass deals throughout with a broad spectrum of opinions and interpretations. He begins by surveying the primary issues in parables interpretation. Offering both a new, more functional classification system for Jesus' parables and guidelines for interpreting them, he provides an overview of other parables -- often neglected in the discussion -- from the Old Testament, Jewish writings, and the Greco-Roman world. The remaining chapters group the longer and more important parables of Jesus thematically and give a comprehensive treatment of each, including background and significance for today.

Untutored Lines

... to the paradigms of prose composition and leave aside the more elementary,
syntactical manipulations of chreia, also traditionally called 'progymnasmata'.
See Ronald F. Hock and Edward N. O'Neil, eds, The Chreia in Ancient Rhetoric,
vol.

Untutored Lines

Author: William P Weaver

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 0748649204

Page: 232

View: 204

Provides a new understanding of the epyllion as a genre exploiting the subversive potential of various educational thresholds, such as the transition from grammar to rhetoric.

Patterns of Persuasion in the Gospels

A very constructive conversation developed, Robbins representing the work of
the SBL Seminar on pronouncement stories, and Mack the work of the Claremont
project on the chreia in ancient rhetoric. We exchanged papers and ideas
through ...

Patterns of Persuasion in the Gospels

Author: Burton L. Mack

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN: 1606082205

Page: 240

View: 962

Libanius s Progymnasmata

The examples here have previously been translated by Hock and O'Neil, Chreia
and ancient rhetoric, 140–97. Anecdote 1: Alexander, upon being asked by
someone where he kept his treasures, pointed to his friends.1 brief Praise (1)
That ...

Libanius s Progymnasmata

Author: Libanius

Publisher: Society of Biblical Lit

ISBN: 1589833600

Page: 572

View: 744

This volume presents the original text and the first English translation of the largest surviving ancient collection of preliminary exercises used to teach young men how to compose their own prose, a crucial step toward public speaking and a career worthy of the educated elite. Graded in difficulty, the exercises range from simple fables and narratives to discussions of wise sayings, speeches of praise and blame, impersonations of figures from myth, descriptions of statues and paintings, and essays on general propositions (e.g., should one marry?). It provides a unique glimpse into the schoolrooms of the ancient Mediterranean from the Hellenistic period to the Byzantine Empire, vividly illustrating how ancient educators used myth, history, and popular ethics to shape their students characters as they sharpened their ability to think, write, and speak.

Paul s Definitions of the Gospel in Romans 1

Chapter 3 The Ancient Rhetorical Theorists on Brevity 3.1 Introduction I
demonstrated in the previous chapter that ancient thinkers regard brevity as a
distinctive feature of definition . In order to achieve the goal of instilling their
definitions with a ...

Paul s Definitions of the Gospel in Romans 1

Author: Robert Matthew Calhoun

Publisher: Mohr Siebeck

ISBN: 9783161509490

Page: 270

View: 398

Revision of the author's thesis (doctoral)--University of Chicago.

Introduction to the Synoptic Gospels

Ronald F. Hock and Edward N. O'Neil, The Chreia in Ancient Rhetoric, Volume I:
The Progymnasmata (Atlanta: Scholars, 1986). 49.For a helpful summary of the
discussion, see Betz, Sermon 98 introduction to the synoptic gospels Sayings ...

Introduction to the Synoptic Gospels

Author: Pheme Perkins

Publisher: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing

ISBN: 0802865534

Page: 336

View: 288

In this book respected New Testament scholar Pheme Perkins delivers a clear, fresh, informed introduction to the earliest written accounts of Jesus — Matthew, Mark, and Luke — situating those canonical Gospels within the wider world of oral storytelling and literary production of the first and second centuries. Cutting through the media confusion over new Gospel finds, Perkins s Introduction to the Synoptic Gospels presents a balanced, responsible look at how the Gospels of Matthew, Mark, and Luke came to be and what they mean.

The Composition of the Sayings Source

BIBLIOGRAPHY Ancient Sources Ahiqar . In OTP ( 1985 ) , 2 . 494 - 507 .
Translated by J . M . Lindenberger . Amenemhat . In William Kelley Simpson , ed .
The Literature of Ancient Egypt . An Anthology of ... The Chreia in Ancient
Rhetoric .

The Composition of the Sayings Source

Author: Alan K. Kirk

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004110854

Page: 443

View: 808

this book analyzes Q in the light of compostitional conventions of ancient wisdom genres. Genre-critical models are employed to subject the Q materials to comprehensive analysis, criticallly assess redaction-histories, and show that Q conforms to conventions of ancient paraenesis.

The Apocalypse of Peter

R . F . Hock and E . N . O ' Neil , The Chreia in Ancient Rhetoric 1 ( Atlanta , 1986
) 313 . 4 According to J . Neils , ' Others Within the Other : An Intimate Look at
Hetairai and Maenads ' , in B . Cohen ( ed ) , Not the Classical Ideal . Athens and
 ...

The Apocalypse of Peter

Author: Jan N. Bremmer

Publisher: Peeters Publishers

ISBN: 9789042913752

Page: 213

View: 202

The Apocalypse of Peter is the first modern collection of studies on this intriguing Early Christian book, that has mainly survived in Ethiopic. The volume starts with a short survey of the Forschungsgeschichte and a discussion of the old question regarding its eventual inspiration: Greek or Jewish. It is followed by a new look at the circumstances of its finding, the composition of the codex and its character, and also by a new edition of the Bodleian and Rainer fragments. The major part of the book studies various aspects and passages of the Apocalypse: the nature of the Ethiopic pseudo-Clementine work that contained the Apocalypse, false prophets, the Bar Kokhba hypothesis, Paradise, the post-mortem 'baptism' of sinners, the grotesque body, the pattern of justice underlying our work, the Old Testament quotations and the reception of the Apocalypse in ancient Christianity. The book concludes with a study of the Gnostic Apocalypse of Peter. As has become customary, the volume is rounded off by a bibliography and a detailed index.

The Gnostic Bible

1 In ancient Mesopotamia, wisdom is also praised, often as a gift of the gods. In
one text an unnamed sage praises ... On sayings of the Cynic philosophers, see
Hock and O'Neil,The Chreia in Ancient Rhetoric. O people, to you I call out and ...

The Gnostic Bible

Author: Willis Barnstone

Publisher: Shambhala Publications

ISBN: 9780834824140

Page: 896

View: 704

Gnosticism was a wide-ranging religious movement of the first millennium CE—with earlier antecedents and later flourishings—whose adherents sought salvation through knowledge and personal religious experience. Gnostic writings offer striking perspectives on both early Christian and non-Christian thought. For example, some gnostic texts suggest that god should be celebrated as both mother and father, and that self-knowledge is the supreme path to the divine. Only in the past fifty years has it become clear how far the gnostic influence spread in ancient and medieval religions—and what a marvelous body of scriptures it produced. The selections gathered here, in poetic, readable translation, represent Jewish, Christian, Hermetic, Mandaean, Manichaean, Islamic, and Cathar expressions of gnostic spirituality. Their regions of origin include Egypt, the Greco-Roman world, the Middle East, Syria, Iraq, China, and France. Also included are introductions, notes, an extensive glossary, and a wealth of suggestions for further reading.