The First Afghan War 1839 42

This book goes on to trace the retribution attack on Kabul the following year, which destroyed the symbolic Mogul Bazaar before rapidly withdrawing and leaving Afghanistan in peace for nearly a generation.

The First Afghan War 1839   42

Author: Richard Macrory

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1472813995

Page: 96

View: 541

In 1839 forces of the British East India Company crossed the Indus to invade Afghanistan on the pretext of reinstating a former king Shah Soojah to his rightful throne. The reality was that this was another step in Britain's Great Game – Afghanistan would create a buffer to any potential Russian expansion towards India. This history traces the initial, campaign which would see the British easily occupy Kabul and the rebellion that two years later would see the British army humbled. Forced to negotiate a surrender the British fled Kabul en masse in the harsh Afghan winter. Decimated by Afghan guerilla attacks and by the harsh cold and a lack of food and supplies just one European – Dr Brydon would make it to the safety of Jalalabad five days later. This book goes on to trace the retribution attack on Kabul the following year, which destroyed the symbolic Mogul Bazaar before rapidly withdrawing and leaving Afghanistan in peace for nearly a generation.

Britain in Afghanistan

This is the story of how that led to just one British soldier-the sole survivor of a slaughtered British army and its followers-staggering into Allahabad-just three years after the folly began.

Britain in Afghanistan

Author: Archibald Forbes

Publisher:

ISBN: 9781846773044

Page: 164

View: 816

From invasion to destruction-a British military disaster. Following over a century of the gradual assumption of sovereignty of the Indian Sub-Continent, the British Empire, in the form of the Honourable East India Company, supported by troops of the new Queen Victoria's army, found itself inevitably at the natural boundaries that surround Afghanistan. There it set in motion a series of disastrous events-the first of which was to march into the country at all. After an initially successful campaign and the placement of a ruler more acceptable to the British-if totally unacceptable to the Afghans-on the throne, there came the far more formidable-and ultimately hopeless-task of controlling an almost unconquerable and inhospitable land and people. This is the story of how that led to just one British soldier-the sole survivor of a slaughtered British army and its followers-staggering into Allahabad-just three years after the folly began. This was the first time Britain fought to control Afghanistan. It would by no means be the last!

The Afghan Wars

This work is perfect for students of British and Middle Eastern military history. ARCHIBALD FORBES (1838-1900) was a British war correspondent born in Morayshire, Scotland.

The Afghan Wars

Author: Archibald Forbes

Publisher: Cosimo, Inc.

ISBN: 1616405201

Page: 354

View: 509

The Afghan Wars, written by Archibald Forbes in 1892, is a British account of two Anglo-Afghan wars, fought between British India and Afghanistan; the first war took place from 1839-1842, and and the second from 1878-1880. Though history dictates the conclusion of both British invasions (in which neither side really wins the wars and the Britons retreat twice, but still accomplish their objectives), Forbes' account is saturated with details of the occupations and soldiers' experiences, while still conveying the overall experience and outcome of each war. It also includes illustrations of important figures and war plans which complement Forbes' descriptions. This work is perfect for students of British and Middle Eastern military history. ARCHIBALD FORBES (1838-1900) was a British war correspondent born in Morayshire, Scotland. He attended the University of Aberdeen before entering the Royal Dragoons as a private. He was injured and released from his regiment; he was working as a journalist in London when the Franco-Prussian War began in 1870 and he was drafted to the front lines as a correspondent. He became a representative for the Daily News which publicized his work in intelligence transmission. After the war, he traveled to Spain, India, Serbia, Cyprus, and South Africa, working for the Daily News and reporting on various wars and campaigns. Forbes also authored several books, including an autobiography, about his experiences.

The Afghan Wars 1839 42 and 1878 80

Archibald Forbes. The First Afghan War --- THE AFGHAN WARS PART I THE
FIRST AFGHAN WAR.

The Afghan Wars  1839 42 and 1878 80

Author: Archibald Forbes

Publisher: London : Seeley

ISBN:

Page: 337

View: 382

This is a pre-1923 historical reproduction that was curated for quality. Quality assurance was conducted on each of these books in an attempt to remove books with imperfections introduced by the digitization process. Though we have made best efforts - the books may have occasional errors that do not impede the reading experience. We believe this work is culturally important and have elected to bring the book back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide.

The Anglo Afghan Wars 1839 1919

This book reveals the history of these three Anglo-Afghan wars, the imperial power struggles that led to conflict and the torturous experiences of the men on the ground.

The Anglo Afghan Wars 1839   1919

Author: Gregory Fremont-Barnes

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1472810082

Page: 96

View: 534

During the 19th century Britain entered into three brutal wars with Afghanistan, each one saw the British trying and failing to gain control of a warlike and impenetrable territory. The first two wars (1839–42 and 1878–81) were wars of the Great Game; the British Empire's attempts to combat growing Russian influence near India's borders. The third, fought in 1919, was an Afghan-declared holy war against British India – in which over 100,000 Afghans answered the call, and raised a force that would prove too great for the British Imperial army. Each of the three wars were plagued by military disasters, lengthy sieges and costly engagements for the British, and history has proved the Afghans a formidable foe and their country unconquerable. This book reveals the history of these three Anglo-Afghan wars, the imperial power struggles that led to conflict and the torturous experiences of the men on the ground. The book concludes with a brief overview of the background to today's conflict in Afghanistan, and sketches the historical parallels.

Return of a King

Informed by the author’s decades-long firsthand knowledge of Afghanistan, and superbly shaped by his hallmark gifts as a narrative historian and his singular eye for the evocation of place and culture, The Return of a King is both the ...

Return of a King

Author: William Dalrymple

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0307958299

Page: 560

View: 565

From William Dalrymple—award-winning historian, journalist and travel writer—a masterly retelling of what was perhaps the West’s greatest imperial disaster in the East, and an important parable of neocolonial ambition, folly and hubris that has striking relevance to our own time. With access to newly discovered primary sources from archives in Afghanistan, Pakistan, Russia and India—including a series of previously untranslated Afghan epic poems and biographies—the author gives us the most immediate and comprehensive account yet of the spectacular first battle for Afghanistan: the British invasion of the remote kingdom in 1839. Led by lancers in scarlet cloaks and plumed helmets, and facing little resistance, nearly 20,000 British and East India Company troops poured through the mountain passes from India into Afghanistan in order to reestablish Shah Shuja ul-Mulk on the throne, and as their puppet. But after little more than two years, the Afghans rose in answer to the call for jihad and the country exploded into rebellion. This First Anglo-Afghan War ended with an entire army of what was then the most powerful military nation in the world ambushed and destroyed in snowbound mountain passes by simply equipped Afghan tribesmen. Only one British man made it through. But Dalrymple takes us beyond the bare outline of this infamous battle, and with penetrating, balanced insight illuminates the uncanny similarities between the West’s first disastrous entanglement with Afghanistan and the situation today. He delineates the straightforward facts: Shah Shuja and President Hamid Karzai share the same tribal heritage; the Shah’s principal opponents were the Ghilzai tribe, who today make up the bulk of the Taliban’s foot soldiers; the same cities garrisoned by the British are today garrisoned by foreign troops, attacked from the same rings of hills and high passes from which the British faced attack. Dalryrmple also makes clear the byzantine complexity of Afghanistan’s age-old tribal rivalries, the stranglehold they have on the politics of the nation and the ways in which they ensnared both the British in the nineteenth century and NATO forces in the twenty-first. Informed by the author’s decades-long firsthand knowledge of Afghanistan, and superbly shaped by his hallmark gifts as a narrative historian and his singular eye for the evocation of place and culture, The Return of a King is both the definitive analysis of the First Anglo-Afghan War and a work of stunning topicality.

Animal Labor and Colonial Warfare

The army began to learn about the logistical difficulties posed by the
northwestern part of British India during the First Afghan War (183942). Its
invasion of Afghanistan in 1839 brought into focus a number of transport
problems that would ...

Animal Labor and Colonial Warfare

Author: James L. Hevia

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022656228X

Page: 344

View: 487

Until well into the twentieth century, pack animals were the primary mode of transport for supplying armies in the field. The British Indian Army was no exception. In the late nineteenth century, for example, it forcibly pressed into service thousands of camels of the Indus River basin to move supplies into and out of contested areas—a system that wreaked havoc on the delicately balanced multispecies environment of humans, animals, plants, and microbes living in this region of Northwest India. In Animal Labor and Colonial Warfare, James Hevia examines the use of camels, mules, and donkeys in colonial campaigns of conquest and pacification, starting with the Second Afghan War—during which an astonishing 50,000 to 60,000 camels perished—and ending in the early twentieth century. Hevia explains how during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries a new set of human-animal relations were created as European powers and the United States expanded their colonial possessions and attempted to put both local economies and ecologies in the service of resource extraction. The results were devastating to animals and human communities alike, disrupting centuries-old ecological and economic relationships. And those effects were lasting: Hevia shows how a number of the key issues faced by the postcolonial nation-state of Pakistan—such as shortages of clean water for agriculture, humans, and animals, and limited resources for dealing with infectious diseases—can be directly traced to decisions made in the colonial past. An innovative study of an underexplored historical moment, Animal Labor and Colonial Warfare opens up the animal studies to non-Western contexts and provides an empirically rich contribution to the emerging field of multispecies historical ecology.

Parameters

Though Flashman himself is fictional , his activities are set in the context of actual
wars and campaigns in which fictional and historical characters are realistically
mingled . His earliest exposure to fire occurs in the First Afghan War ( 1839-42 ) ...

Parameters

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page:

View: 488

The Athenaeum

Mr. death of Shere Ali , and the recognition of Forbes has accepted the version
given by Yakoub Khan occupies but a few pages The Afghan Wars , 183942
and 1878–80 . Major Broadfoot , which General Salo - Hiil of Mr. Forbes's history :
By ...

The Athenaeum

Author: James Silk Buckingham

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page:

View: 647

The Athenaeum

Mr. death of Shere Ali , and the recognition of The Afghan Wars , 1839-42 and
1878–80 . Major Broadfoot , which General Sale - Hiin of Mr. Forbes's history :
Forbes has accepted the version given by Yakoub Khan occupies but a few
pages By ...

The Athenaeum

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page:

View: 501

The First Afghan War and Its Causes

... journal I find the following entry , under date January 31 , 1839 :" We called on
Mr . Masson . He gave us a very ... The Afghans , of whom Mr . Masson speaks
highly , laughed at this soi - disant envoy , and discredited him in toto . Had
Burnes had ... 1 The British envoy ' s accounts of the siege 42 THE FIRST
AFGHAN WAR .

The First Afghan War and Its Causes

Author: Sir Henry Marion Durand

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page: 445

View: 800

The Bengal Horse Artillery 1800 1861

7 The First Afghan War , 1839-42 ( 1 ) Twelve years of peace ended in 1837
when the Governor General , Lord Auckland , embarked on the ' fatal experiment
of dethroning Dost Mohammed , the Amir of Afghanistan , and putting in his place
 ...

The Bengal Horse Artillery  1800 1861

Author: Basil Perronet Hughes

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page: 184

View: 986

Victoria s Wars

March 1839 Chinese commissioner confiscates 20 , 000 chests of British - owned
opium in the southern port of Canton . Start of the First Opium War ( 1839 - 42 ) .
10 March 1839 Invasion of Afghanistan by Lieutenant - General Sir John Keane ...

Victoria s Wars

Author: Saul David

Publisher: Viking Adult

ISBN:

Page: 503

View: 999

During the period known as the 'Dual Monarchy', from Queen Victoria's accession in 1837 to the death of her husband Albert in 1861, the British Empire almost quintupled in size. Its cities, canals, railways and telegraphs were changing the face of continents. It was well on the way to becoming the greatest empire the world had ever seen.This is the story of that extraordinary quarter century of imperial conquest and the people who made it happen: the politicians, colonial administrators, businessmen, generals and ordinary soldiers.In a fast-moving narrative that ranges from the ministries and royal residences of London to the harsh terrain of India, Russia and the Far East, Saul David shows how Britain ruthlessly exploited her position as the world's only superpower to expand her empire. Yet little of this territorial acquisition was planned or sanctioned by the home government. Instead it was largely the work of the men on the ground, and to those at home it really did seem that the empire was acquired in a 'fit of absence of mind'.Using a wealth of archival material, Saul David creates a vivid portrait of life on the violent fringes of empire, and of the seemingly endless, brutal and often unnecessary wars that were fought in the name of trade, civilization and the balance of power.

Choice

95 Published in Great Britain as Signal Catastrophe , the book is an account of
the First Afghan War ( 1839 - 42 ) in which the British vainly attempted to
establish a puppet king on the Afghan throne in order to protect India from what
was ...

Choice

Author: Richard K. Gardner

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page:

View: 668