The Medieval Imagination

T. Clanchy, Times Literary Supplement The collection begins with an essay on 'the marvelous.

The Medieval Imagination

Author: Jacques Le Goff

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226470856

Page: 293

View: 433

To write this history of the imagination, Le Goff has recreated the mental structures of medieval men and women by analyzing the images of man as microcosm and the Church as mystical body; the symbols of power such as flags and oriflammes; and the contradictory world of dreams, marvels, devils, and wild forests. "Le Goff is one of the most distinguished of the French medieval historians of his generation . . . he has exercised immense influence."—Maurice Keen, New York Review of Books "The whole book turns on a fascinating blend of the brutally materialistic and the generously imaginative."—Tom Shippey, London Review of Books "The richness, imaginativeness and sheer learning of Le Goff's work . . . demand to be experienced."—M. T. Clanchy, Times Literary Supplement

The Medieval Imagination

Celebrating the life and works of Yolande de Pontfarcy Sexton, this volume builds on her work to show how, in European medieval narratives, archetypes and beliefs can impart a deeper vibrancy to human experience, reconfiguring the everyday ...

The Medieval Imagination

Author: Phyllis Gaffney

Publisher: Four Courts PressLtd

ISBN: 9781846823282

Page: 214

View: 852

Celebrating the life and works of Yolande de Pontfarcy Sexton, this volume builds on her work to show how, in European medieval narratives, archetypes and beliefs can impart a deeper vibrancy to human experience, reconfiguring the everyday into something rich and strange. A newly edited text ("Lay of the sparrowhawk") and eleven essays all focus on marvels of many kinds, ranging across imaginative literature and including even more imaginative forays into travel writing, ethnography, and historiography, from the insular and continental Middle Ages.

Incest and the Medieval Imagination

"This interdisciplinary study is the first broad survey of medieval incest stories in Latin and the vernaculars (mainly French, English and German).

Incest and the Medieval Imagination

Author: Elizabeth Archibald

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0198112092

Page: 295

View: 325

"This interdisciplinary study is the first broad survey of medieval incest stories in Latin and the vernaculars (mainly French, English and German). It situates the incest theme in both literary and cultural contexts, and offers many thought-provoking comparisons and contrasts to our own society in terms of gender relations, the power of patriarchy, the role of religious institutions in regulating morality, and the relationship between life and literature."--BOOK JACKET.

Landscape in Middle English Romance

These popular texts also reveal widespread concern regarding the damaging effects of human actions and climate change.

Landscape in Middle English Romance

Author: Andrew M. Richmond

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108831499

Page: 290

View: 899

Our current ecological crises compel us not only to understand how contemporary media shapes our conceptions of human relationships with the environment, but also to examine the historical genealogies of such perspectives. Written during the onset of the Little Ice Age in Britain, Middle English romances provide a fascinating window into the worldviews of popular vernacular literature (and its audiences) at the close of the Middle Ages. Andrew M. Richmond shows how literary conventions of romances shaped and were in turn influenced by contemporary perspectives on the natural world. These popular texts also reveal widespread concern regarding the damaging effects of human actions and climate change. The natural world was a constant presence in the writing, thoughts, and lives of the audiences and authors of medieval English romance - and these close readings reveal that our environmental concerns go back further in our history and culture than we think.

Passion Relics and the Medieval Imagination

Passion Relics and the Medieval Imagination

Author: Cynthia Hahn

Publisher: University of California Press

ISBN: 0520305264

Page: 176

View: 680

Although objects associated with the Passion and suffering of Christ are among the most important and sacred relics venerated by the Catholic Church, this is the first study that considers how they were presented to the faithful. Cynthia Hahn adopts an accessible, informative, and holistic approach to the important history of Passion relics—first the True Cross, and then the collective group of Passion relics—examining their display in reliquaries, their presentation in church environments, their purposeful collection as centerpieces in royal and imperial collections, and finally their veneration in pictorial form as Arma Christi. Tracing the ways that Passion relics appear and disappear in response to Christian devotion and to historical phenomena, ranging from pilgrimage and the Crusades to the promotion of imperial power, this groundbreaking investigation presents a compelling picture of a very important aspect of late medieval and early modern devotion.

Medieval Imagination

aristocracy in the medieval sense , and the bourgeoisie does not seek to emulate
it . Love today , besides having ... Imagination is a fundamental feature of the
conception of art prevalent from the twelfth to the fifteenth century . It is
particularly ...

Medieval Imagination

Author: Douglas Kelly

Publisher: Univ of Wisconsin Press

ISBN: 9780299076108

Page: 330

View: 451

Medieval Imagination examines the poetry of courtly love with unprecedented thoroughness. Douglas Kelly offers detailed analyses of numerous works within a historical, conceptual, and artistic framework to establish the underlying concept of Imagination in courtly poetry. He capitalizes the term to underscore its medieval sense: the poet's invention of significant images to represent a certain conception of truth. Imagination, thus, in its metaphorical sense of providing an idea with a suitable representation in an image, permitted an allegory of love in romance and dream vision from the twelfth century on. The techniques employed in Imagination--allegory, personification, metonymy, synecdoche--are analyzed in detail as amplification. In addition to his complete coverage of the better-known poets like Guillaume de Lorris, Machaut, and Froissart, Kelly examines the work of such rarely treated writers as René d'Anjou and Oton de Grandson, as well as the Echecs amoureux and related medieval Latin writings. The concluding chapters including Charles d'Orléans, Chartier, and Christine de Pisan. The later chapters are a rare boon to French scholars in providing a survey of Middle French courtly literature, a little-explored area of scholarship. Kelly's documentation is a fresh and useful contribution to the interpretation of this too-often neglected period.The flower of medieval French culture, the poetry of courtly love, is examined with an unprecedented thoroughness in this work. Douglas Kelly offers detailed analyses of numerous works within a historical, conceptual, and artistic framework.

The Barbarian North in Medieval Imagination

Edited by George Ferzoco, University of Bristol Carolyn Muessig, University of
Bristol 1 Gender and Holiness Men, Women and Saints in Late Medieval Europe
Edited by Samantha J. E. Riches and Sarah Salih 2 The Invention of Saintliness ...

The Barbarian North in Medieval Imagination

Author: Robert Rix

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317589696

Page: 214

View: 358

This book examines the sustained interest in legends of the pagan and peripheral North, tracing and analyzing the use of an ‘out-of-Scandinavia’ legend (Scandinavia as an ancestral homeland) in a wide range of medieval texts from all over Europe, with a focus on the Anglo-Saxon tradition. The pagan North was an imaginative region, which attracted a number of conflicting interpretations. To Christian Europe, the pagan North was an abject Other, but it also symbolized a place from which ancestral strength and energy derived. Rix maps how these discourses informed ‘national’ legends of ancestral origins, showing how an ‘out-of-Scandinavia’ legend can be found in works by several familiar writers including Jordanes, Bede, ‘Fredegar’, Paul the Deacon, Freculph, and Æthelweard. The book investigates how legends of northern warriors were first created in classical texts and since re-calibrated to fit different medieval understandings of identity and ethnicity. Among other things, the ‘out-of-Scandinavia’ tale was exploited to promote a legacy of ‘barbarian’ vigor that could withstand the negative cultural effects of Roman civilization. This volume employs a variety of perspectives cutting across the disciplines of poetry, history, rhetoric, linguistics, and archaeology. After years of intense critical interest in medieval attitudes towards the classical world, Africa, and the East, this first book-length study of ‘the North’ will inspire new debates and repositionings in medieval studies.

The Medieval World

This groundbreaking collection brings the Middle Ages to life and conveys the distinctiveness of this diverse, constantly changing period.

The Medieval World

Author: Peter Linehan

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 9780415302340

Page: 745

View: 510

This groundbreaking collection brings the Middle Ages to life and conveys the distinctiveness of this diverse, constantly changing period. Thirty-eight scholars bring together one medieval world from many disparate worlds, from Connacht to Constantinople and from Tynemouth to Timbuktu. This extraordinary set of reconstructions presents the reader with a vivid re-drawing of the medieval past, offering fresh appraisals of the evidence and modern historical writing. Chapters are thematically linked in four sections: identities beliefs, social values and symbolic order power and power-structures elites, organizations and groups. Packed full of original scholarship, The Medieval World is essential reading for anyone studying medieval history.

Saracens

Saracens explores the social and ideological uses of contempt, explaining how the denigration of the other can be used to defend one's own intellectual construction of the world.

Saracens

Author: John V. Tolan

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231506465

Page: 400

View: 496

In the first century of Islam, most of the former Christian Roman Empire, from Syria to Spain, was brought under Muslim control in a conquest of unprecedented proportions. Confronted by the world of Islam, countless medieval Christians experienced a profound ambivalence, awed by its opulence, they were also troubled by its rival claims to the spiritual inheritance of Abraham and Jesus and humiliated by its social subjugation of non-Muslim minorities. Some converted. Others took up arms. Still others, the subjects of John Tolan's study of anti-Muslim polemics in medieval Europe, undertook to attack Islam and its most vivid avatar, the saracen, with words. In an effort to make sense of God's apparent abandonment of Christendom in favor of a dynamic and expanding Muslim civilization, European writers distorted the teachings of Islam and caricatured its believers in a variety of ways. What ideological purposes did these portrayals serve? And how, in turn, did Muslims view Christianity? Feelings of rivalry, contempt, and superiority existed on both sides, tinged or tempered at times with feelings of doubt, inferiority, curiosity, or admiration. Tolan shows how Christian responses to Islam changed from the seventh to thirteenth centuries, through fast-charging crusades and spirit-crushing defeats, crystallizing into polemical images later drawn upon by Western authors in the fourteenth to twentieth centuries. Saracens explores the social and ideological uses of contempt, explaining how the denigration of the other can be used to defend one's own intellectual construction of the world.

The Apocalyptic Imagination in Medieval Literature

During the Middle Ages, the Apocalypse, or Book of Revelation, was believed to contain both the grand design of sacred history and the disguised history of the Present and future.

The Apocalyptic Imagination in Medieval Literature

Author: Richard Kenneth Emmerson

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page: 244

View: 464

During the Middle Ages, the Apocalypse, or Book of Revelation, was believed to contain both the grand design of sacred history and the disguised history of the Present and future. In The Apocalyptic Imagination in Medieval Literature, Richard K. Emmerson and Ronald B. Herzman explore die pervasiveness of apocalypticism in medieval literature through close readings of a group of major texts not generally considered from an apocalyptic perspective. Emmerson and Herzman present a new reading of Bonaventure's Major Life of Francis of Assisi, a key document in the Franciscan tradition. In their examination of the Romance of the Rose, they argue that allegorical romance takes a surprising turn toward contemporary social criticism, a criticism informed by a sophisticated and subtle use of the apocalyptic tradition. The authors also contend that while the apocalyptic language of the Divine Comedy is more obvious, its significance has not been systematically studied, and that The Canterbury Tales, all but ignored from an apocalyptic perspective, are infused with significant apocalyptic dimensions. The Apocalyptic Imagination in Medieval Literature offers a broad and comparative focus, and it should be of value not simply to students of medieval literature but to the broader audience of those interested in medieval intellectual history, art history, and religious history as well.

Medieval Blood

Publisher Description

Medieval Blood

Author: Bettina Bildhauer

Publisher:

ISBN: 9780708321973

Page: 245

View: 532

An important chapter in the history of the human body, this study investigates the significance of medieval writers' view of the body as merely a container of blood. Written from an interdisciplinary perspective, the discussion includes why the blood of Christ and the saints were venerated, how knights' blood was spilled to establish their superior valor, and how the discipline of medicine understood health and personality to be based on blood. Also discussed is the role of medieval law in regulating bloodshed and the mixing of blood, while also upholding the social links between families based on blood.

Anglo Saxon Culture and the Modern Imagination

The Anglo-Saxon world continues to be a source of fascination in modern culture. Its manifestations in a variety of media are here examined.

Anglo Saxon Culture and the Modern Imagination

Author: David Clark

Publisher: Boydell & Brewer

ISBN: 1843842513

Page: 283

View: 392

The Anglo-Saxon world continues to be a source of fascination in modern culture. Its manifestations in a variety of media are here examined.

Building the Medieval World

Building the Medieval World—the fourth in the popular series The Medieval
Imagination, which draws upon the collections of illuminated manuscripts at the J.
Paul Getty Museum and the British Library—turns its attention not only to such
iconic ...

Building the Medieval World

Author: Christine Sciacca

Publisher: Getty Publications

ISBN: 1606060066

Page: 96

View: 246

Introduction : architecture in medieval life -- Mirror of the medieval world -- The castle -- Church spaces -- Medieval cities, towns, and countryside -- Documenting historical buildings -- Medieval construction methods -- Focus : architecture inside and out -- Architecture in stories and symbols -- Architecture in scripture -- Architecture in medieval literature -- Saints and their architectural symbols -- The Virgin Mary and the church -- Focus : architecture takes center stage -- Architecture beyond buildings -- Architecture in the margins -- Triumphal arches and niches of honor -- Framing charts and texts -- Structuring compositions -- Focus : architecture abstracted

Theology and the Scientific Imagination from the Middle Ages to the Seventeenth Century

"(This work) promises to raise the level and transform the nature of discourse on the relations of Christianity and science . . . (Funkenstein) leaps fearlessly from one philosophical mountaintop to another, comparing and contrasting ...

Theology and the Scientific Imagination from the Middle Ages to the Seventeenth Century

Author: Amos Funkenstein

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9780691024257

Page: 421

View: 330

"(This work) promises to raise the level and transform the nature of discourse on the relations of Christianity and science . . . (Funkenstein) leaps fearlessly from one philosophical mountaintop to another, comparing and contrasting doctrines in an amazing display of intellectual dexterity. The result is a bold study of ideas . . . bristling with insight and perceptive reinterpretation of familiar episodes in the history of natural philosophy".--David C. Lindberg, "Journal of the History of Medicine". *Lightning Print On Demand Title

The Middle Ages in Popular Imagination

And why is this important? In this book, the first evidence-based exploration of the wider public's understanding of the Middle Ages, Paul B. Sturtevant adapts sociological methods to answer these important questions.

The Middle Ages in Popular Imagination

Author: Paul B. Sturtevant

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1786733579

Page: 320

View: 515

It is often assumed that those outside of academia know very little about the Middle Ages. But the truth is not so simple. Non-specialists in fact learn a great deal from the myriad medievalisms - post-medieval imaginings of the medieval world - that pervade our everyday culture. These, like Lord of the Rings or Game of Thrones, offer compelling, if not necessarily accurate, visions of the medieval world. And more, they have an impact on the popular imagination, particularly since there are new medievalisms constantly being developed, synthesised and remade. But what does the public really know? How do the conflicting medievalisms they consume contribute to their knowledge? And why is this important? In this book, the first evidence-based exploration of the wider public's understanding of the Middle Ages, Paul B. Sturtevant adapts sociological methods to answer these important questions. Based on extensive focus groups, the book details the ways - both formal and informal - that people learn about the medieval past and the many other ways that this informs, and even distorts, our present. In the process, Sturtevant also sheds light, in more general terms, onto the ways non-specialists learn about the past, and why understanding this is so important. The Middle Ages in Popular Imagination will be of interest to anyone working on medieval studies, medievalism, memory studies, medieval film studies, informal learning or public history.

The Medieval French Pastourelle Tradition

Les Inventions ovidiennes de Froissart : Réflexions intertextuelles comme
imagination . ” Littérature 41 ( 1981 ) : 82 – 92 . - . The Medieval Imagination :
Rhetoric and the Poetry of Courtly Love . Madison : Kelly , F . Douglas . “
Reflections on ...

The Medieval French Pastourelle Tradition

Author: Geri L. Smith

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page: 321

View: 290

One of the most popular genres created and performed by Medieval troubadours and trouveres was the pastourelle. In this work Geri Smith examines the genre in the hands of three Medieval masters: Adam de la Halle, Jen Froissart, and Christine de Pizan.

Monsters in the Italian Literary Imagination

CHAPTER “ A la tetta de la madre s ' apprende ” : The Monstrous Nurse in Dante '
s Grammar of Selfhood GARY P . CestaRO I would like to situate my reading of
Lady Grammar in Dante and medieval culture within recent definitions of sexual ...

Monsters in the Italian Literary Imagination

Author: Keala Jane Jewell

Publisher: Wayne State University Press

ISBN: 9780814328385

Page: 325

View: 604

A culture defines monsters against what is essentially thought of as human. Creatures such as the harpy, the siren, the witch, and the half-human all threaten to destroy our sense of power and intelligence and usurp our human consciousness. In this way, monster myths actually work to define a culture's definition of what is human. In Monsters in the Italian Literary Imagination, a broad range of scholars examine the monster in Italian culture and its evolution from the medieval period to the twentieth century. Editor Keala Jewell explores how Italian culture juxtaposes the powers of the monster against the human. The essays in this volume engage a wide variety of philological, feminist, and psychoanalytical approaches and examine monstrous figures from the medieval to postmodern periods. They each share a critical interest in how monsters reflect a culture's dominant ideologies.