Gender and the Great War

Gender and the Great War provides a global, thematic approach to a century of scholarship on the war, masculinity and femininity, and it constitutes the most up-to-date survey of the topic by well-known scholars in the field.

Gender and the Great War

Author: Susan R. Grayzel

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0190271078

Page: 286

View: 272

Gender and citizenship / Kimberly Jensen -- Gender and resistance / Erika Kuhlman -- Gender and work / Deborah Thom -- Gender and race / Richard S. Fogarty -- Gender and sexuality / Ana Carden-Coyne and Laura Doan -- Gender and age / Tammy M. Proctor -- Gender and occupation / Jovana Kneevic -- Gender and everyday life / Karen Hunt -- Gender and warfare / Susan R. Grayzel -- Gender and violence / Michelle Moyd -- Gender and mourning / Joy Damousi -- Gender and memory / Karen Petrone -- The scholarship of the First World War / Susan R. Grayzel and Tammy M. Proctor

Women in the Great War

In this fascinating history, husband and wife coauthors Stephen and Tanya Wynn chronicle the effects of the Great War on the lives of women, and how those experiences shaped the women’s suffrage movement.

Women in the Great War

Author: Stephen Wynn

Publisher: Grub Street Publishers

ISBN: 1473865417

Page: 152

View: 838

A “superlative social history” of British women’s efforts in WWI and how they led to the women’s suffrage movement—includes photos (Books Monthly). In this fascinating history, husband and wife coauthors Stephen and Tanya Wynn chronicle the effects of the Great War on the lives of women, and how those experiences shaped the women’s suffrage movement. Before the war, women were employed as domestic servants, clerical workers, shop assistants, teachers, or barmaids. But after the outbreak of World War I, women began working in munitions factories, as nurses in military hospitals, bus drivers, mechanics, and taxi drivers. They began filling jobs and social roles that had previously been reserved only for men. When the war finally came to a close, there was no going back for these determined women. Many were experiencing financial freedom for the first time and were reluctant to give up their independence. At the same time, tens of thousands of women were widowed with young children and already navigating new lives as heads of household. Chronicling the collective and individual stories of British women during the war, Women in the GreatWar demonstrates the profound and lasting impact the female war effort had on women’s social history.

Women Men and the Great War

Gathers the war stories of more than twenty authors, including Kay Boyle, Mulk Raj Anand, and Joseph Conrad

Women  Men and the Great War

Author: Trudi Tate

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 9780719045981

Page: 298

View: 184

Gathers the war stories of more than twenty authors, including Kay Boyle, Mulk Raj Anand, and Joseph Conrad

Irish Women and the Great War

This is the first book-length study of the impact of the Great War on women's everyday lives in Ireland, focussing on the years of the war and its immediate aftermath.

Irish Women and the Great War

Author: Fionnuala Walsh

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1108871674

Page:

View: 918

This is the first book-length study of the impact of the Great War on women's everyday lives in Ireland, focussing on the years of the war and its immediate aftermath. Fionnuala Walsh demonstrates how Irish women threw themselves into the war effort, mobilising in various different forms, such as nursing wounded soldiers, preparing hospital supplies and parcels of comforts, undertaking auxiliary military roles in port areas or behind the lines, and producing weapons of war. However, the war's impact was also felt beyond direct mobilisation, affecting women's household management, family relations, standard of living, and work conditions and opportunities. Drawing on extensive research in archives in Ireland and Britain, Walsh brings women's wartime experience out of the historical shadow and examines welfare and domestic life, bereavement, social morality, employment, war service, politicisation, and demobilisation to challenge ideas of emancipation and reflect upon the significant impact of the Great War on Irish society.

The Great War and Women s Consciousness

Tylee (U. of Malaga) shows that there does exist an imaginative memory of The Great War that is distinctively women's.

The Great War and Women s Consciousness

Author: Claire M. Tylee

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page: 293

View: 738

Tylee (U. of Malaga) shows that there does exist an imaginative memory of The Great War that is distinctively women's. She deals with journalism and women war-correspondents, with propaganda and the construction of consciousness, with censorship, pacifism, women's autobiographies and fictionalized w

Women s Writing on the First World War

Letters, diary entries, reportage, and essays, as well as polemical texts in favour of, or in opposition to, the hostilities, offer an interestingcounterpoint to the novels and short stories through which women sought to encompass the ...

Women s Writing on the First World War

Author: Honorary Senior Lecturer in Comparative Literature Agnes Cardinal

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780198122807

Page: 374

View: 533

The First World War inspired a huge outpouring of writing, including many classic accounts of the horrors of the trenches, written by men. What has been less visible until now is the Wars impact upon women writers, whose experience was often very different from that of their male counterparts.This anthology brings together women's writing from across the world, covering every genre of writing about the War from the period 1914 to 1930. Letters, diary entries, reportage, and essays, as well as polemical texts in favour of, or in opposition to, the hostilities, offer an interestingcounterpoint to the novels and short stories through which women sought to encompass the extremes of wartime life as they saw it. This anthology demonstrates how the Great War acted as a catalyst for women writers, enabling them to find a public voice and to assert their own attitude to social andmoral issues.

Irish Servicewomen in the Great War

The story of these Irish servicewomen in the Great War winds up within the interwar period that followed. Had often dangerous war experiences affected these women's postwar life-changing decisions and aspirations?

Irish Servicewomen in the Great War

Author: Barbara Walsh

Publisher:

ISBN: 9781526767943

Page: 232

View: 184

When the call went out in 1917 for volunteers willing to serve both at home and on the Western Front in a newly founded Women's Army Auxiliary Corps, young women from every province of Ireland responded just as eagerly as those from homes in Scotland, England and Wales.Drawn from every class, creed, family background and ability, the girls who came forward to join the WAAC from Ireland had often suffered equal heartbreak over the loss of husbands, brothers and friends killed or wounded in France. Yet, their willingness to help bring about an end to the slaughter was a narrative that became ignored in popularised versions of that politically volatile era and it is hoped that this study will now go some way to restore a rightful recognition of their army service days within the historiography of twentieth-century Irishwomen.Their work as office workers, cooks and caterers, motor transport drivers, cryptanalysis and hi-tech telecommunication personnel are examined. Close investigation is made of the Irishwomen seconded to the Royal Engineers from branches of the General Post Office in Ireland and elsewhere. Attached to Signal units, they became key players in ensuring the Western Front's crucial, high-security army Lines of Communication remained viable.The story of these Irish servicewomen in the Great War winds up within the interwar period that followed. Had often dangerous war experiences affected these women's postwar life-changing decisions and aspirations? Compare/contrast experiences in the postwar era are cited. There were new careers, migration, home and family life. How many had foreseen that twenty years hence, Irish women 'veterans' of the Great War would once more rally at a time of fresh crisis?

Women and the Great War

Women and the Great War focuses on women's experiences during the period of violent conflict - the Great War.

Women and the Great War

Author: Bruce Scates

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521469180

Page: 172

View: 285

Women and the Great War focuses on women's experiences during the period of violent conflict - the Great War. It examines the role of women as peace activists as well as their role in the military and support services. Source materials, including historical documents, photographs and cartoons, together with student activities, are used to focus the reader on the way violent conflict altered women's traditional roles.

The Virago Book of Women and the Great War

Joyce Marlow presents a fascinating and varied collection of women's writing on the Great War drawn from diaries, newspapers, letters and memoirs from across Europe and the States.

The Virago Book of Women and the Great War

Author:

Publisher: Virago

ISBN: 9781860495595

Page: 432

View: 162

Joyce Marlow presents a fascinating and varied collection of women's writing on the Great War drawn from diaries, newspapers, letters and memoirs from across Europe and the States. Starting with material from 1914, she outlines the pre-war campaigns for suffrage and then the demand from women eager to be counted amongst those in action. Contemporary accounts and reports describe their experience on the field and reactions to women in completely new areas, such as surgery as well as on the home front. The words of women in the UK, America, France and Germany display a side to the war rarely seen. Familiar voices such as those of Vera Brittain, Millicent Fawcett, May Sinclair, Alexandra Kollontai, the Pankhurst family and Beatrice Webb, as well as the unknown, make this anthology a truly indispensable guide to the female experience of a war after which women's lives would never be the same.

Women s Fiction and the Great War

The Great War stimulated a sudden growth in the novel industry. Well known writers such as Mrs Humphry Ward and Edith Wharton found themselves jostled by authors like Ruby M. Ayres, Kate Finzi, and Olive Dent.

Women s Fiction and the Great War

Author: Suzanne Raitt

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0198182783

Page: 293

View: 447

The essays in this volume on women's writing of the First World War are written from an explicitly theoretical and academic feminist perspective. The contributors - including a number of leading female academics - challenge current thinking about women's responses to the First World War and explore the differences between women writers of the period, thus questioning the very categorization of `women's writing'. The Great War stimulated a sudden growth in the novel industry. Well known writers such as Mrs Humphrey Ward and Edith Wharton found themselves jostled by authors like Ruby M. Ayres, Kate Finzi, and Olive Dent. The trauma of the war continued to reverberate through much of the fiction published in the years that followed its inglorious end. This volume considers some of the best known, and some of the least known, women writers on whose work the war left its shadow. The writing of some of the most famous 'modernist' women writers - including Virginia Woolf, Katherine Mansfield, and H. D. - is reassessed as war literature, and the work of long-neglected authors such as Vernon Lee, Frances Bellerby, and Mary Butts is given serious attention for the first time.

Evidence History and the Great War

The essays in this volume incorporate a European perspective, engage with the historiography of the war, and consider how the primary textural, oral and pictorial evidence has been used - or abused.

Evidence  History  and the Great War

Author: Gail Braybon

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 9781571818010

Page: 248

View: 817

In the English-speaking world the Great War maintains a tenacious grip on the public imagination, and also continues to draw historians to an event which has been interpreted variously as a symbol of modernity, the midwife to the twentieth century and an agent of social change. Although much 'common knowledge' about the war and its aftermath has included myth, simplification and generalisation, this has often been accepted uncritically by popular and academic writers alike. While Britain may have suffered a surfeit of war books, many telling much the same story, there is far less written about the impact of the Great War in other combatant nations. Its history was long suppressed in both fascist Italy and the communist Soviet Union: only recently have historians of Russia begun to examine a conflict which killed, maimed and displaced so many millions. Even in France and Germany the experience of 1914-18 has often been overshadowed by the Second World War. The war's social history is now ripe for reassessment and revision. The essays in this volume incorporate a European perspective, engage with the historiography of the war, and consider how the primary textural, oral and pictorial evidence has been used - or abused. Subjects include the politics of shellshock, the impact of war on women, the plight of refugees, food distribution in Berlin and portrait photography, all of which illuminate key debates in war history.

Cutting a New Pattern Uniformed Women in the Great War

The book's purpose is to bring this question to the fore and show why it matters. Of the many ways the Great War divided the past from the future, few were more significant than the reordered place of women in society.

Cutting a New Pattern  Uniformed Women in the Great War

Author: Barton C. Hacker

Publisher: Smithsonian Institution Scholarly Press

ISBN: 9781944466350

Page: 412

View: 699

"The Smithsonian Institution's commemoration of the First World War Centenary will include a book provisionally entitled "Cutting a New Pattern: Uniformed Women in the Great War." Twenty international historians and museum curators discuss the significance of large numbers of women wearing uniforms during the Great War. This ground-breaking project moves women's uniforms to center stage and expands traditional historical techniques with material culture studies. Scholars in recent decades have begun to pay a great deal of attention to the mobilization of women in the Great War, but why so many women, civilian and military alike, wore uniforms is a question that has scarcely been asked, much less answered. The book's purpose is to bring this question to the fore and show why it matters. Of the many ways the Great War divided the past from the future, few were more significant than the reordered place of women in society. Although women's new status clearly had prewar roots, it just as clearly derived from their wartime participation in uniform. Not only did tens of thousands of women for the first time become members of the uniformed forces, many tens of thousands more wore uniforms as members of an enormous variety of paramilitary or quasi-military services, civilian relief and welfare organizations, and as workers. Uniformed female workers and volunteers for wartime service in such large numbers were unprecedented. Why did so many women wear uniforms and what did it mean? Uniforms had multiple meanings both for the organizations that demanded them and the women who eagerly donned them. Among the most important was that the uniform-whether that of the armed forces, of paramilitary organizations, or of civilian agencies-served to visibly display women's service and thus to make a forceful symbolic claim to full citizenship"--

Most Dangerous Women

Describes the activities of women's peace groups during World War I and depicts the efforts of women to encourage a negotiated end to the conflict

Most Dangerous Women

Author: Anne Wiltsher

Publisher: London ; Boston : Pandora Press

ISBN:

Page: 263

View: 950

Describes the activities of women's peace groups during World War I and depicts the efforts of women to encourage a negotiated end to the conflict

French Women and the First World War

In tracing stories about war heroines, but also about villainesses like Mata Hari, this study shows what these stories reveal about French understanding of the First World War, and their hopes and fears for the future.

French Women and the First World War

Author: Margaret H. Darrow

Publisher: Berg Pub Limited

ISBN:

Page: 341

View: 293

In tracing stories about war heroines, but also about villainesses like Mata Hari, this study shows what these stories reveal about French understanding of the First World War, and their hopes and fears for the future.

French Women and the First World War

This book explores stories that were never told and why they were not.

French Women and the First World War

Author: Margaret H. Darrow

Publisher: Berg Publishers

ISBN: 9781859733660

Page: 341

View: 176

Despite acts of female heroism, popular memory, as well as official memorialization in monuments and historic sites, has ignored French women's role in the First World War. This book explores stories that were never told and why they were not. These include the experiences of French women in the war, the stories they themselves told about these experiences and how French society interpreted them.The author examines the ways French women served their country - from charity work, nursing and munitions manufacture to volunteering for military service and espionage. In tracing stories about war heroines, but also about villainesses like Mata Hari, this fascinating study shows what these stories reveal about French understanding of the war, their hopes and fears for the future. While the masculine war story was unitary and unchanging, the feminine story was multiple and shifting. Initially praised for their voluntary mobilization, women's claims of patriotism were undercut by criticisms as the war bogged down in the trenches. Were nurses giving solace or seeking romance? Were munitions workers patriots or profiteers? The prosecutions of Mata Hari for espionage and Hélène Brion for subversion show how attitudes to women's claim of patriotism changed. French women's relationship to the war called into question ideas about gender, definitions of citizenship and national identity.This book is the first study of women at war to treat both their experiences and its representations, which shaped nationalism, war and gender for the rest of the twentieth century. It makes an important contribution to the burgeoning history of collective memory and of the First World War.

The Honourable Women of the Great War

Consists of biographical dictionary followed by two lists : those receiving Royal Red Cross decorations for nursing services; others, principally workers in hospitals and institutions.

The Honourable Women of the Great War

Author: P. Campion

Publisher:

ISBN: 9781847346797

Page: 376

View: 258

Consists of biographical dictionary followed by two lists : those receiving Royal Red Cross decorations for nursing services; others, principally workers in hospitals and institutions.

Female Intelligence

Informative and innovative, this book focuses on the cultural images, realities, challenges, and contradictions for women in intelligence service in Britain during World War I.

Female Intelligence

Author: Tammy M. Proctor

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 0814766943

Page: 205

View: 139

"Sol Dollinger's remembrance of UAW's early days are juicy and provocative. His recall of those goofy internecine political battles within the union is tragic-comic. Yet they, united, even though hollering at each other, made GM, Ford, et al,recognize the union. The sequence involving Genora Johnson Dollinger, the heroine of the 1937 sit-down strike, is deeply moving and inspiring." --Studs Terkel "Should be read by every labor person who takes the principles of trade union history seriously. . . . Brings the history of the UAW up for a new survey of the events to include the men and women who would otherwise be unsung heroes or written out of history totally." --David Yettaw President, UAW Buick Local 599, 1987-1996 This story of the birth and infancy of the United Auto Workers, told by two participants, shows how the gains workers made were not easy or inevitable-not automatic-but required strategic and tactical sophistication as well as concerted action. Sol Dollinger recounts how workers, especially activists on the political left, created an auto union and struggled with one another over what shape the union should take. In an oral history conducted by Susan Rosenthal, Genora Johnson Dollinger tells the gripping tale of her role in various struggles, both political and personal.

Women and the Great War

Drawing on both wartime discourse about women and the voices of individual women living at the Italian Front, Allison Belzer analyzes how women participated in the Great War and how it affected them.

Women and the Great War

Author: Allison Scardino Belzer

Publisher: Italian and Italian American S

ISBN:

Page: 271

View: 473

Drawing on both wartime discourse about women and the voices of individual women living at the Italian Front, Allison Belzer analyzes how women participated in the Great War and how it affected them. The Great War transformed women into purveyors and recipients of a new feminine ideal that emphasized their status as national citizens. Although Italian women did not gain the vote, they did encounter a less empowering form of female citizenship just after the war ended with Mussolini’s Fascism. Because of the Great War, many women seized the opportunity to participate in a society that continued to recognize them as guardians of the nation.

A Woman s Experiences in the Great War

And he adds in the best English manner, "It could never be permitted!" Outside,
the day dies down. The sound of cannon has entirely ceased. One can hear
nothing now, nothing at all, but the loud and shrill cries of the newsboys and
women ...

A Woman s Experiences in the Great War

Author: Louise Mack

Publisher: Good Press

ISBN:

Page: 892

View: 999

"A Woman's Experiences in the Great War" by Louise Mack. Published by Good Press. Good Press publishes a wide range of titles that encompasses every genre. From well-known classics & literary fiction and non-fiction to forgotten−or yet undiscovered gems−of world literature, we issue the books that need to be read. Each Good Press edition has been meticulously edited and formatted to boost readability for all e-readers and devices. Our goal is to produce eBooks that are user-friendly and accessible to everyone in a high-quality digital format.